Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | login

Would you have a look at this?

http://www.paulgraham.com/avg.html

reply


It seems it is the same idea behind Polymer's core-ajax, what do you think?

https://www.polymer-project.org/0.5/docs/elements/core-ajax....

reply


And not to México either... :(

reply


Mu.

reply


This would be great material for a GitBook: https://www.gitbook.com/

reply


Why? What about the iteractive shaders?

reply


That could be used in-browser as it is right now.

But going to a publishing platform could also earn his efforts some money for a work well done. Open a channel to receive donations (or sells). Supporting the book through economic means might motivate the author enough to see through its completion.

reply


I think it doesn't really hurt, on the contrary, because of the name it might attract the _techie people_ and become the de facto publishing platform for all sorts of technical books.

reply


I'm interested. That book would help me with my unix foundations. Go ahead Zed!

-----


Immune to what? Should keep the original title.

-----


If you look at the light-grey note at the bottom of the article, you will find this:

A version of this article appears in print on September 6, 2014, on page A10 of the New York edition with the headline: Many in West Africa Are Thought to Be Immune, but Finding Them Will Not Be Easy.

So that was the original (printed) title.

-----


You know what I meant, right? And the article mentioned as the source is not linkable.

-----


On another related note, when titles are edited by HN staff they shouldn't be in Title Case. That's deceptive.

-----


Here you can read about this principle:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance

The take away part in the article is this: "... so there is no way to produce collisions."

-----


It depends on who are you explaining it to.

If you are explaining it to a seasoned C++-only programmer it makes sense to explain lambdas in terms of other C++ features. Even more if lambdas are based internally on said features.

-----


I'd disagree there. If you explain it only in terms of what is already there, then the question "So why bother?" comes up.

If I were to explain classes as "Suppose you have a struct, and a set of functions that were required to have that struct as their first argument", then classes wouldn't seem to have a point.

If I were to explain polymorphism as "Suppose you have a table of function pointers in each struct, and whenever you want to call a function, you first look it up", then virtual function pointers wouldn't seem to have a purpose.

-----


OTOH if you only explain why you add this feature and not how it is done, then 1) the 'magic' sense of the feature may bother developers who likes to know how things work 2) you don't understand the limitations of the feature linked to the implementation. So both how and why are needed, me I prefer an explanation of 'how works X' before 'why use X', a short 'why' followed by 'how it is implemented' and a more detailed 'why' is best but YMMV..

-----


I agree that users of a programming language should understand the implementations and costs of its abstractions. That said, I think lambda is an important enough abstraction that it should just work as the math says, without arbitrary limitations. Anything less than that is a point against the language. This paragraph from "History of T" [1] is interesting:

> Good Scheme compilers use a range of implementations for the lambdas in the program, depending upon what they can determine about the lambdas at compile time -- how they're used, to where they are passed, the relationship between the uses and the definition points, etc. Some lambdas just evaporate into nothing. Some lambdas turn into control-flow join points with associated register/variable bindings. Some lambdas turn into stack frames. But some lambdas cause heap allocation to produce general closures.

[1] http://www.paulgraham.com/thist.html

-----

More

Applications are open for YC Summer 2015

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Y Combinator | Apply | Contact

Search: