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“Reclaim Windows 10” Powershell Script (github.com)
319 points by maxt 111 days ago | hide | past | web | 261 comments | favorite



I had been a long time Windows user, at home (W10) and work(7/Server/Datacenter). Windows had been getting just more and more intrusive like a malware since the last couple years. I hope they do something to stop that. I have recently moved to Fedora and it is just awesome. Pretty much everything works like amazing. Its not a complete replacement if you are gaming, nvidia drivers are a bit painful to install but everything else just works. Its been stable even after an update to Fedora 24->25. I am so amazed at how far linux has come. I am so satisfied with it that i am not moving back to Windows for home usage.

I hope Microsoft stops with auto-update, otherwise the alternatives are also catching up fast if you are not a gamer.


"Everything just works" so long as your expectations around "everything" are essentially set by a desktop computer experience designed in 2005.

Linux on desktops is fine (except from a physical security standpoint), but primitive in terms of UX. And it's still dependent on Mozilla or Google for its browsing experience.

And if you want a portable computer (which by the way are demonstrably more secure in the face of physical tampering) you basically relegate yourself to terrible battery life, poor display support, dicey sleep support, and the fixes for these often compromise performance.

I really wish Linux users would stop softballing their desktop vendors and kernel maintainers so much. It's just not competitive!


It's not primitive in terms of UX. You just need to spend more time configuring it. Some will argue that that means it's primitive, but I don't think so.

The point about portable computers is also false. You just need to pick a machine with hardware manufactured by friendly vendors who help write drivers. Why would you want to support anyone else?

Battery life? My x230 with tpm installed gets 6 hours of battery life on the stock battery.

Display support? I'm using a 2560x1440 monitor with the mini displayport on my x230 right now and have had no issues with it whatsoever. Plays Quake 3 great too, no tearing. Debian Jessie.

Sleep support?

/etc/systemd/logind.conf

HandleLidSwitch=suspend

Performance issues? My system idles at 200mb. Good luck getting macOS or Windows to do that. And to preempt the bias card, I use a Mac for work and love it to death. I think most of your points were applicable in 2005. The terrain has changed and the mainstream Linux distributions are now very stable and usable daily driver systems.

Linux is more than competitive, it's just not targeted at inexperienced users. Which is fine. Not everyone has the need or want to configure their computer to suit them. Some people just need a computer that works. That's why macOS and Windows exist.


>It's not primitive in terms of UX. You just need to spend more time configuring it.

Aaaaand this is why I opted away from Linux and back into the Windows world after university. I'm trying to get shit done, I want to install and go and almost never have to touch anything but my code and solving my problems - NOT solving the problems with the tools that I'm ostensibly supposed to be using to solve my problems.

For all the flak it gets, since 7, Windows Just Works for me.


I just had to change the same setting on windows, changing a line in a text file is much simpler than the maze of configuration dialogs I had to go through on windows. The linux way is easier, but the windows one is more discoverable, it would be nice to have an inbetween.


> It's not primitive in terms of UX. You just need to spend more time configuring it. Some will argue that that means it's primitive, but I don't think so.

Okay, so... let's just think about what you said for a second. Windows 10 and Mac OS X deliver extremely high end configuration with a lot of extensibility in their Window managers via first and third parties without extensive modifications. I have some unique XMonad configurations too! But if I have to be a direct contributor to my experience, I remove a lot of the credit from the people who shipped the software, because they basically sent me an SDK for making a good UI environment.

> The point about portable computers is also false. You just need to pick a machine with hardware manufactured by friendly vendors who help write drivers. Why would you want to support anyone else?

Yeah. "Lenovo is friendly" is not a very compelling argument. Their support and sales are miserable. Their machines are unimpressive. Their supported versions of Linux are years out of date.

> Battery life? My x230 with tpm installed gets 6 hours of battery life on the stock battery.

My surface book gets 6 hours of battery life even if I'm compiling android binaries regularly. Without changing anything.

> HandleLidSwitch=suspend

Are you actually going to pretend that sleep support isn't a major issue for many portable hardware setups? Or is this restricted to "only specific token gesture devices from specific vendors?"

> Performance issues? My system idles at 200mb. Good luck getting macOS or Windows to do that.

What does this have to do with performance?

> The terrain has changed and the mainstream Linux distributions are now very stable and usable daily driver systems.

So.. tell me... does Canonical's kernel update purge old kernel images yet, or are regular users still SOL after about 8 months of use unless they invoke a shell script they barely understand provided by stack overflow? Asking for a friend who I had to do this form.

> Linux is more than competitive,

If Linux is only for experienced users but both OSX and Windows can deliver to the full spectrum, then that's a superset, doge.

This kind of double standard is why linux ends up getting overhyped.


A Linux system with Gnome comes with good defaults, too. The difference is that with Linux you can use XMonad if you so wish, but don't pretend that that is what a new user faces.

> Yeah. "Lenovo is friendly" is not a very compelling argument. Their support and sales are miserable. Their machines are unimpressive. Their supported versions of Linux are years out of date.

I don't care about sales, and they publish excellent hardware maintenance manuals which means that I don't need to rely on their support. You say that their machines are unimpressive, but I don't share that sentiment. They're not flashy, sure. But they're rock-solid and take a lot of abuse. You can drop them or spill liquids on the keyboard, and your system will be fine. Just wait a minute for your drink to come back out at the bottom. And despite that, they're still pretty light. I think they're quite impressive.

>> Battery life? My x230 with tpm installed gets 6 hours of battery life on the stock battery.

> My surface book gets 6 hours of battery life even if I'm compiling android binaries regularly. Without changing anything.

You're comparing a 5-year old computer to a brand new one. Apples and oranges.

> > HandleLidSwitch=suspend

> Are you actually going to pretend that sleep support isn't a major issue for many portable hardware setups? Or is this restricted to "only specific token gesture devices from specific vendors?"

Never had a sleep issue with my ThinkPad, ever. There is no vendor support for Linux.

> So.. tell me... does Canonical's kernel update purge old kernel images yet, or are regular users still SOL after about 8 months of use unless they invoke a shell script they barely understand provided by stack overflow? Asking for a friend who I had to do this form.

That's a Ubuntu issue, not a general one, and they should really offer an option to do this automatically. There's no excuse not to. But that's hardly a big issue, is it?

But tell me, does Windows auto-remove the remains of failed updates automatically now? Because during the Christmas holidays, I used the disk cleanup tool to remove several Gigabytes of them from a family member's Windows 10 computer.


at least I don't have to run 300 lines of powershell to remove telemetry and candy crush soda saga from my brand new computer

checkmate


I don't either, and I never did. My brand new computer shipped without spamware, because I chose a reputable vendor like Microsoft and not famously abusive vendors like, say, Lenovo.

I'm not terribly concerned about app or browser telemetry. If you're using Chrome, you're spitting back a ton. Firefox? Still sending some! Your mobile device? Spitting back a ton. Everyone other machine? Also doing so. Canonical? Also doing some, although to their credit it's less.

You have basically equated all telemetry with intrusive spyware, when in fact it's usually banal data designed to make it easy to identify problems after a bad software push. While maybe we could have a discusion about where to draw the line of "too much" for Windows 10, you've set such a profound double standard you won't even allow a dialogue about it.


OP's comment around Candy Crush has nothing to do with Lenovo and everything to do with Microsoft. It happens - by default - on clean installs of Windows 10.


6 hours battery life is bare minimum these days. I wouldn't brag about it the way you are.

2560x1400 external monitor? Doesn't sound like a HiDPI display unless it's only 15". This is another bare minimum thing I wouldn't brag about.

"good sleep support" has very little to do with activating sleep by shutting the lid. Grandposter is referring to Linux's terrible reputation for successfully going to sleep and waking up without crashing. You fail to convince again.

Quake 3 is an 18 year old game. How is it's performance in 2017 anything to write home about?

RAM is plentiful, the fact your idle system fits in 200mb is thus unimpressive too.

You, sir, yourself, sound like you have 2005 standard. (Or perhaps 1999 standards? That's when Quake 3 came out.)


>6 hours battery life is bare minimum these days.

sad to think that 'MacBook Pro' is the bare minimum now.[0]

>RAM is plentiful, the fact your idle system fits in 200mb is thus unimpressive too.

not true. It is impressive that a modern machine can be ran and coordinated on such a small footprint.

Ram isn't eaten up with a zero cost. In other words : memory usage indicates more than just what's available, it's a performance metric.

[0]: http://www.theverge.com/2016/11/14/13616404/apple-macbook-pr...


> sad to think that 'MacBook Pro' is the bare minimum now.[0]

Yes! Actually! Older Macbooks have better battery life! Apple's quest for form factor has actually led them to cut into battery life for their top models. This is why people jokingly tell me to "upgrade to a 2014 mac."

> not true. It is impressive that a modern machine can be ran and coordinated on such a small footprint.

It's also impressive that Red Fraggle can balance two pickles on her nose. It's not really relevant to the claim of "performance" though. It's equally irrelevant to security. Unless you define performance as "fitting into a minimal RAM footprint." Something many memory allocators elect not to do because of the compaction cost hurting running time performance.


Yup, bleeding-edge laptop support is still a toss-up, but it's getting better, IMHO!

I think that's where this sentiment often comes from: people who cut their teeth on XF86Config tweaking and compiling NVidia kernel modules from source and shopping for just the right PCMCIA wireless adapter are now amazed when a fresh Ubuntu install has working 3D-accelerated graphics, 802.11n (with GUI for configuration), Bluetooth, etc. (And yes, we have Freedesktop.org/systemd/NetworkManager and friends to thank for a lot of this.)

Maybe the bar was just really low, and you've got a strong argument if you say it shouldn't be anymore, but we are making progress...


> Maybe the bar was just really low, and you've got a strong argument if you say it shouldn't be anymore, but we are making progress...

I was one of those people for longer than I can remember. Last year I decided that it was time for me to make this argument. I don't regret the time I spent learning, tinkering, and sometimes wrestling Linux into working. However, while Linux has made a ton of progress, the gap between what "just works" and what users expect has only grown. My time and needs are just too valuable to me now to be messing around with Linux.


You and others make a good point about getting going faster on windows, but one thing that a lot of people don't factor in is the amount of time fiddling with windows as well. Getting it working or fixing problems and other configuration probs. And not all hardware works well under windows or the latest version of windows. There is some real time spent trying to configure windows as well.

The main problem that the article presents is that windows acts like malware which brings a new element to your desktop. I remember getting a popup notification from facebook, this after I thought I turned off all of that stuff. You don't face that in linux. You did with some earlier versions of Ubuntu, but not anymore.

No doubt, windows brings computing to people who aren't technical and makes it easy, but anything beyond the most simple configuration will take a lot of time as well.


I have a Windows PC and an Ubuntu system running on the same NUC hardware, as well as a higher end desktop that I use. I have to twiddle with the Ubuntu system pretty much once every 3-4 months after an update breaks something. The Windows 10 box keeps running... My big desktop has upgraded from 7->8->8.1->10, and is still running, though I'm considering a clean install, as some of the cruft from experimenting with the WSL and Docker for Windows Containers has left things a little funky.

In the end, I find I have to spend far more time tinkering with my HTPC box running Ubuntu, then I ever really had to with windows. I know there are other distros, but Ubuntu is pretty much king of desktop linux here. I have considered switching to Debian proper, or an Ubuntu derivative, but haven't done so.

Oh, and don't get my started on the pain of getting an MCE remote working halfway properly under Kodi... that was a real painful experience. I'm just glad that suspend/resume has hdmi audio after now, where it lost it before some recent changes (daily intel driver ppa).


Apple has really pushed the bar up in terms of what users expect from their computers out of the box, and that has affected Windows as well, so in some sense Linux has been swimming upstream? treading water?

In the mid-90s I remember endlessly fiddling with CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT to squeeze out that extra 30kb of conventional memory to run some game. Buying peripherals was such a crap shoot that 'Plug and Play' was something that needed to be advertised, and much of the time you were still stuck manually juggling IRQs, moving cards to different slots, etc.

Nowadays, one can buy any Windows or Mac computer/peripheral and generally expect it to work, with some bare minimum of reading reviews.

So while Linux has made tremendous strides in terms of driver support (you mean my wifi actually works now?), things are still very far from zero conf that users have become accustomed to.

Time is valuable, and 2-10 hours spent experimenting with various driver packages, editing text config files, recompiling the kernel, etc. is literally money out of the user's pocket, not to mention the learning curve if you don't already know how to do all these things. That doesn't include the time for extra research to see what hardware is well supported.

Here's an example of install instructions on a pretty well-supported laptop that does Linux [1]. I'd guesstimate an hour of time if you've already done this before, and anything up to 10 hours if you run into unexpected difficulties or are totally new to this.

[1] http://chaos-reins.com/2016-11-14-arch-yoga-910/


I like how you picked Arch, which is notorious as one of the few distros without an installer program, and the most difficult to install. I also highly doubt that recompiling kernels are the norm, though I may just be going off of a decade or so of experience...


I've been running Linux for about 4 years now (Ubuntu -> Mint -> Fedora -> Arch over the first year or so, been on Arch ever since), and I've never had to recompile my kernel (I did choose to do it once, but this was because I was interested in trying it out rather than something not working right; I'm a bit masochistic that way).


This.

I'm a big fan of Arch myself, but if you look at the distro's philosophy, manually installing it is actually the point. There are enough other distros if you want to avoid that.


I mentioned Arch because its repos/kernel seem the most up to date and hence most likely to support newish hardware. Plus their docs for getting to run on new laptops seems pretty comprehensive [1].

Looking for directions for that laptop on Ubuntu returns a bunch of frustrated users and rather conflicting testimony:

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&e...

Disclaimer: not an Arch user myself

[1] https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Category:Laptops


> And if you want a portable computer (which by the way are demonstrably more secure in the face of physical tampering) you basically relegate yourself to terrible battery life, poor display support, dicey sleep support, and the fixes for these often compromise performance.

This depends a lot on how well supported your hardware is. I run Linux Mint (MATE) on a Thinkpad T430 and have had 0 issues with displays, sleep, battery life, you name it.


Running Linux Mint MATE 17.3 on my ThinkPad T530 for a couple years now with no problems. I even game on it with Steam (XCOM runs OK on the integrated Intel graphics). Been very happy with it.


I have a T520 and last year I tried to run Ubuntu, but my battery life was around 20% worse than under Windows 10 (and the Windows 10 battery life wasn't great either). You say you haven't had any batter life issues. Does that mean it isn't worse than Windows?


Have you plugged in an external monitor and not had an issue? I think that's not the norm even for that setup.


What do you mean by issue? After a couple of xrandr invocations to configure them, which could be automated by some GUI app if I were so inclined, I've never seen external monitors have issues on either of my Linux laptops.


Requiring an xrandr invocation equals to having issues. Perhaps it's a small problem, perhaps it's a very easy problem, but it definitely is a problem.

Not having issues means that you arrive at the hardware (which you may have never seen, e.g. at a customer's site), plug the wires, and it works immediately.

More importantly, not having issues means that you can rely on being able to just plug the wires and have it work, and that you don't have a risk of being unable to make it work immediately even if you forget the right invocations and are offline and can't look them up.


> plug the wires, and it works immediately

How does it work immediately? How does it know of I want to clone or extend the display? If I extend, do I want the same resolution on both screens, or different? You'll have to set that somehow, and whether it's a GUI or a CLI tool doesn't matter.

Forgetting the invocations aren't really an issue anymore either, my shell (zsh) has autocompletion of xrandr outputs, modes and resolutions.


With OSX/Windows, it tends to mirror by default and/or present a window asking you what you want to do.

Requiring a CLI to connect a monitor/projector is a UX fail.


There are plenty of tools to automate that. arandr is a very simple and powerful tool to arrange monitors with a GUI. Gnome has its own, much simpler, monitor configuration dialog. My system defaults to extending to the right, by the way, because that's generally what I want when connecting a projector.

None of this is new, and the whole point of this discussion is that Linux desktops are much better than they were ten years ago. It is that old state that many folks have in mind when criticising Linux distros' usability. It's just not a very interesting discussion to have.


And the thing I think you're hearing is that "progress" should not equate to "good enough." Doing a sensible and even helpful thing by default is part of user friendliness.


On my Thinkpad's X200 (VGA) and X220 (VGA, DisplayPort), plugging in external monitors has always Just Worked. I've been running Xubuntu on them for about 5 years.

It even worked on the first try from the X220's DisplayPort through a DP-to-HDMI-cable onto a TV.

-----

I've never had to use xrandr or any command line tool to select displays – on Xubuntu, there's this little graphical dialogue: http://netupd8.com/w8img2/xfce-mini-displays.png that pops up (or you can force it to show by hitting that key on the Thinkpad keyboard with the picture of an external display).

OTOH, I did just a month ago for the first time actually use xrandr, but this time it was because I wanted to write a script that set my windows and monitors up "just right" for how I like it when I'm at the office. I love how easy Linux makes it to do that stuff when I find I do want something automated.


"And it's still dependent on Mozilla or Google for its browsing experience."

Is that your way of saying that you cannot run proprietary stuff like IE or Safari and that .. is a bad thing? I don't know a single person using Edge/IE anywhere around me, so I have trouble parsing and understanding this statement.


Even compiling a chromium shell includes some telemetry! Every browser collects some telemetry and websites do more.

There is no networked computing experience that does not allow vendors to extract metadata.


That's a nice set of rose-coloured glasses you have there. Hey, here's something I can do on my linux desktop that I can't do on my win10 desktop: change the way it looks! Yeah, I know, primitive UX, right!?

And you're right, linux does sometimes require fiddling during installation to install drivers to make hardware work... because as we all know, windows requires no drivers at installation time! All hardware 'just works' without drivers on windows, right? And you never have to be on your toes lest your driver installer sideload some shovelware you didn't want - what a 'modern' UX experience! Yes, please, my mouse driver needs to have it's own service visible in the dock that also phones home separate to all the other items I install. How very modern!

Every desktop env has something that sucks about it, and windows has plenty (remember the clusterfuck that was 'removing the Start button'?). Similarly, if you don't like traditional desktops then there's plenty of alternatives in ^nix-land, like tiling window managers.


I agree with you, that the experience a lot of times not as efficient and that its not for laptops. I had some weird problems on 2015 Macbook pro (max config.) where the linux is not able to shutdown the system, and the whole experience requires a lot of experimenting.

Apart from the above points that you mentioned its definitely not getting you the out-fo-box working functionality that windows gives. But i think i am willing to suffer that much to have a system with more control and an OS which doesn't installs random apps without my permission like Windows 10 does[1].

[1] http://winaero.com/blog/fix-windows-10-installs-apps-like-ca...


Here's an interesting twist on the "out of the box experience": It doesn't just come down to drivers and configs. Yes, Windows might be better situated in that regard (although it also has its problems, try installing it on a PCI SSD the setup doesn't have a driver for...).

But: The time I use up in Linux to configure various things like that I easily waste on Windows while downloading/installing all the tools/graphics drivers I need by hand. The fact here is that Windows' tooling - if not entirely absent - is horrible. And although there are always alternatives that are easy to come by (sysinternals tools, 3rd party tools like Voidtools' Everything, Putty, DisplayFusion, Notepad++, a decent browser, etc.), the fact that their functionality is still not integrated (or there is at least a simple way to bulk-install them) still boggles my mind.

So, railing on about "out of the box" performance from a windows perspective seems a bit off to me. Windows as a blank slate is horrible.


>definitely not getting you the out-fo-box working functionality that windows gives

Oh come on, windows distro doesn't even have coreutils in it.


Although I agree that the "out of the box" experience is still not great on linux, I would ague that it's much more competitive. Most things do work out of the box. And at the end of the day, I have full control of my machine, and the software is being pushed by a group of people who don't see me as "the product". I can't say that about Windows or Mac.


I'd say the out of the box experience of a full install of Ubuntu vs. Windows for a given set of hardware is definitely better. With windows, you often have to seek out the correct graphics driver, and sometimes network driver (though that's about it for the most part).

That said, keeping said system running, when an update causes a regression for your system seems to happen to me far more on my Ubuntu system than my windows or osx ones.


"Everything just works" should be interpreted as an asynchronous piece of code, because there are no guarantees that everything will work "today".


Desktop Linux is eventually consistent?


Depends on your drivers, I mean, the last wart I had to struggle with was some flickering with Electron apps, but reverting to an older model of hardware acceleration did the trick:

http://askubuntu.com/questions/752743/ubuntu-16-04-skylake-6...


i get 10 hours of battery life on my xps, and i get 8 on my libreboot x200.

Battery on linux if perfectly fine.


"But even updates work!"

Same people who love tiling window managers... you're the 1%!


Primitive in terms of UX where?


If you do any creative work, Linux is pretty much a desert. Adobe software doesn't run on Linux, capture one doesn't either, so as a photographer I have no choice but windows (cheap hardware and malware os) or OS X (hyper expensive old generation hardware with passable os).

Davinci resolve seems to have a Linux version but not enough for someone who does more than video.


Not necessarily. I've read from several who have successfully replaced Photoshop with The GIMP. (I've done this, though I still do photo work in LR). Inkscape has come a long way, and there are multiple, competing (and very competent) Lightroom replacements for digital darkroom work.

I don't know how fleshed out the DTP side of things are but as a amateur photographer and graphic designer I've been able to get away without having Adobe anything (except Lightroom) installed for the past few years at home and at work.

You will have to learn a new UI though, but I find this is easier to do than it sounds because most of the open-source software doesn't try so hard to map things to their equivalent real world process. (I found that the hardest thing about Photoshop was its terminology and workflow, which was built to be familiar to film photographers and print media people)


My workflow is heavy on both Lightroom and Photoshop. Both are industry-standard tools and I have invested thousands of hours between them. I don't really see myself migrating toward a tool like GIMP, hoping that after investing many hours I'll discover a feature set will match my needs.

Linkscape is good, but I don't use Illustrator that much. For DTP, Photoshop + InDesign are hard to beat and again, an industry standard.

Maybe I'll run Windows in a VM but I don't really see myself going without these tools which I rely on daily.


> and there are multiple, competing (and very competent) Lightroom replacements for digital darkroom work

The problem I have with most of the replacements is that none of them seem to put much/any effort into cataloguing and taxonomy. There's plenty of open source alternatives for the RAW exposure component of Lightroom but I don't think that's the reason people stick with it. Organising photos is hard and Lightroom is fantastic at it.


Interesting. To me, those features are the ones I struggle most with in Lightroom. The workflow per se works great, but that a tool would dictate to me how I organize my pictures (as in: on the file system) is a big nogo. I use LR in a VM (since it doesn't run on Linux) and in such an environment, there's always a shortage of disk space. LR gives me exactly 0 possibilities to work around that - the only option is to create a new DB for each project, which negates all upsides to the system.


> The workflow per se works great, but that a tool would dictate to me how I organize my pictures (as in: on the file system) is a big nogo.

You mean in a file system at all or you mean that it wants things stored in a particular folder structure? If the latter, Lightroom doesn't enforce any particular structure. If the former, I'm not aware of another solution that works with images that aren't on disk. Darktable, RawTherapee, Capture One Pro etc. all work with stuff on a filesystem.


I don't really care about the folder structure, I'd just like to be able to move parts of my library around without losing all the work I've done.

Darktable for example saves its settings in a file alongside the RAW image. Done. I can move those around without being afraid of anything. LR however enforces Adobe's own, opaque solution that I'm not aware of any possibilities to efficiently manage without going through LR itself.

Don't get me wrong, tagging etc. is nice. I'd just rather do it on my own in a system that I can manage myself (e.g. BeFS if need be).


Anyone whose workflow is InDesign-heavy or Illustrator-heavy is shit out of luck, though; there is no reasonable replacement for either, and especially not for InDesign.


this is so true. If you are photographer then you are ok onn linux.

If you want to make books profesionaly there is no replacement for indesign. Scribus doesnt have multiline paragraph composing. So technicaly if you want to set something to the block, you will get always better result in indesign. 3D and photography are interesting to programmers but books... they make them with TeX. But with tex its hard to do columns and more complicated composition. One way could be scribus latex render windows but its somehow shitty.

Its too niche thing i guess.

Same goes for After Effects - node based composing is fine on linux but layer based for animation (motion graphics). AE only thing on the planet.

Its getting frustrating especialy with recent decline of mac os and mac hw. Again - hackintosh to the rescue but try to find hackintosh laptop.


I did a hackintosh on an older thinkpad, but the experience was less than great, and had to use a usb wireless, as I didn't want to replace the wifi at the time. I went to linux shortly after, and that experience was slightly better, until an intel graphics regression made the system unusable, then back to windows.


There is also Blender for video editing/model rending plus a whole bunch of other stuff.


> If you do any creative work, Linux is pretty much a desert. Adobe software doesn't run on Linux, capture one doesn't either, so as a photographer I have no choice but windows (cheap hardware and malware os) or OS X (hyper expensive old generation hardware with passable os).

Huh? Linux is still one of top platforms for any kind of highend professional video work. Software like Lightworks, CG renderers and designers, etc. Is that not "creative" work?


3D and composing is fine on linux. Some of the highhigh end soft is even linux only (renderfarms are linux).

Its mostly Adobe with their monopoly. The thing is.. i suspect they could target linux atleast experimentaly - since its already multiplatform and on unix. They dont seem to be using much of the OS parts.


Photoshop works really well via Wine, according their testing information. (Which may or may not reflect your experience) https://appdb.winehq.org/objectManager.php?sClass=applicatio...

Capture One may or may not work with Wine; all the tests in the database are old.

Just out of curiosity, though, as a photographer, what does Linux do better than macOS? Apart from the hardware (and my 2012 MBP works great for development and raw processing), I can't see what is compelling about Linux. I ran Linux on my Thinkpad T42 for years (Debian, Gentoo, Ubuntu), and macOS is so much nicer.


Lightroom 5.2 also works really well through Wine (my gf has been using LR via Wine along with GIMP for her photography business for the last 4 years or so).


s/any creative work/digital design/

Photoshop is the industry standard, yes, but 'creative work' extends beyond digital design.


I agree. I implicitly meant "my creative work" which includes photography and digital design.

Having worked with and at digital agencies, adobe is the industry standard. I am open to learning about an agency which does not use Adobe, Sketch etc.


If you can get ahold of the Windows 10 LTSB (Long-term servicing branch) distribution, it's actually really nice. Windows without the store, the cruft, the forced updates, and the telemetry. Unfortunately I believe you need MSDN or an enterprise volume licensing deal to have access to it.


It's just so embarrassing to RDP to a windows server and see ads, news, and a store in the start menu.

Why the hell anyone would want that on a server is beyond me.


The Store is not included in Server SKUs. (except Essentials)


If you prefer the Windows 7 start menu, consider Classic Shell [1].

[1] http://classicshell.net/


Isn't W10 Enterprise available to individuals as a monthly subscription?


I think its a victim of one of those fractal product bifurcations. I think enterprise is available in at least three different editions, depending on update cadence.


https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/itpro/windows/deploy/win...

> Devices currently running Windows 10 Pro, version 1607 can get Windows 10 Enterprise Current Branch (CB) or Current Branch for Business (CBB). This benefit does not include Long Term Service Branch (LTSB)


Telemetry existed before. Was named CEIP but is the same thing.


But you could deactivate the "customer experience improvement program" in Win7, you can't in Win10.


Long time windows user: you can disable windows update in the services menu. Open run --> services.msc


Thanks man.

I know about this already, but the point is that end user experience for me had been getting worse than Windows7 for example (not talking about the UX here). The fact that i have to use powershell or service control center to control the stuff is just not nice. I think an end-user should not be forced to go to regedit to stop Microsoft to install crapware like candy-crush etc.


Being heavily involved in setting up standard developer workstations, I consider this to be the only practical approach. It's way beyond any specific config item (including telemetry). This is a sure way to get to a stable and consistent configuration.

A few comments:

- It is better to split such a mega-script into a set of named scripts, so admins can mix-and-match their own configuration set. - The configuration set scripts should be re-entrant, that is, one can run it few times in a row, achieving the same stable result. This is an important principle because those scripts evolve over time until they are are stable, so the re-entrancy enabled the re-configuration game.

- Some configuration items are system-based while other are user-account-based. This means that the latter should be invoked automatically once a new user account is created.

- VM is your friend. Wash, rinse, repeat.

- It is not always wise to replace automation (PowerShell) invocations with direct registry modifications. Tradeoffs should be obvious.

- MDT setups should avoid direct system configuration wherever possible, and rely on configuration scripts instead.

- One of the features still not possible to script is setting the policy startup/shutdown/login/logout scripts. One can provide this manually in a base workstation image.

- Esp. on Windows systems prior to Windows 10: make sure PowerShell is stable - version and module-wise.


I believe the word you're looking for in your very first list item is "idempotent", not "re-entrant".


Right. One should ensure that simply re-invoking the script will not break anything by itself. The end result between invocations may be different if scripts are modified between invocations, as getting configuration right is a tricky business.


This script is a good start.

I would also change the default policy in Windows Firewall to drop all outgoing traffic, and then enable access on application basis, and for basic things such as DNS and DHCP.

Windows 10 will still spam the DNS server for telemetry hostnames, and there seems to be nothing that you can do about that.

And really, if you can, you should switch to a better OS that doesnt require you to work against it.


I seem to remember a tool that would allow you to do this but made it easy to enable specific application access. Does anyone remember this tool?



I seriously doubt that Windows 10 is doing anything so grave as to require you to run some arbitrary PowerShell script you found on the Internet with elevated privileges. If you do not understand every single command in this thing, you should avoid it, and if you understand every single command in this, you don't need it.


Just to give the other point here. I do understand every line of it and agreed with most of it. I had previously hunt down a lot of those switches manually, now I have a custom fork of this script disabling the stuff that bothers me and keeping those I like. Also, its very presumptuous of you to assume no one need this. If windows welcomed choices like this before it would be a better development environment.


There's another category. Those of us who manually did this already, are annoyed we didn't write down all the steps, but are glad to find this posted here.


There's another category. Those of us who were so aggravated by it we ended up starting an entire open source project and now have 12k users.

https://www.reddit.com/r/TronScript


As I rely on some deeper Windows features (like Storage Spaces), I'd be very wary of running a giant script instead of targeting features I dislike (such as OneDrive sync). Last I saw it breaks features like the Windows Store app.


The whole thing is open source (MIT license) and based largely on community contributions. It did break the Windows Store originally, but that was fixed a long time ago.

If you have any issues with it let me know - we work on it pretty much constantly.


> Last I saw it breaks features like the Windows Store app.

That is a feature, not a bug. I wish I could find something that would break windows trusted installer from using 25% of my CPU all the time on win 7.


There is nothing inherently bad about having a store app. And it's the only way to install some programs. How is its removal a feature?


The windows app store is an infested malware cesspool:

http://www.howtogeek.com/194993/the-windows-store-is-a-cessp...

http://www.itproportal.com/2015/02/23/windows-store-infested...

http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-was-this-windows-store-app-...

They have gotten better (these links are in chronological order), but best practices for individual users and administrators is to disable the windows app store.


> you understand every single command in this, you don't need it.

Just because I understand/know how to verify them doesn't mean I can write them down myself in the same time, so no, I don't "need" it, but it is useful to have and to compare to what I'm usually doing.


Pff don't be paranoid. If there is something malicious in this script then, a) it will be fairly obvious; all this does is modify registry values, and b) someone else will probably post about it - it would be pretty big news!

Besides you clearly need to read it anyway - it does stuff that not everyone will want, like disabling the lock screen.

Edit: In fact I'd be curious if there has ever been an actual instance of `curl ... | sudo sh` being malicious. I mean it's an obvious attack vector but it's also obvious. I've never heard of anyone actually using it.


Do you understand every single line of code in Windows 10? No. Then you can't make the claim it's not doing anything grave. I'm not saying it is. I'm just saying your argument is illogical and inconsistent.


But that's my point. I don't understand every single line of code in Windows. When I run Windows, I'm deciding to trust it. If you've stopped deciding to trust it, then adding more untrusted code (code that relies heavily on undocumented registry flags and the behavior of Windows itself) is like trying to put out a fire with lighter fluid. And this script doesn't have to be malicious to be bad.


Some people run experiments on black-box operating systems, using VMs where changes can be tested and rolled back. There is a long tradition of users reverse engineering Windows behavior. No need to blindly accept anything.


> When I run Windows, I'm deciding to trust it.

I run Windows because I have to for work. I don't trust it.


Some of us don't want any telemetry, or any crap. An idle OS should be idle...


Then get Debian or Fedora. I'm serious, if the OS is doing things so bad you're willing to execute untrusted code with elevated privileges to modify the OS, you've already lost.


> willing to execute untrusted code with elevated privileges to modify the OS

Everything in that script is straightforward and if not easily googled to determine what its doing. It's not black magic.


Its just FUD


This machine is dual boots Win 7 and Linux Mint. Work is an older MBP and another LM desktop. There's one laptop with Win10 that's kept around mainly to keep up with the tech and it would be really nice to turn off all that extra MS bullshit.

But I have to question your attitude, especially here on a forum called "Hacker News"; why do you advocate against exercising ownership over one's rightful property? Microsoft already got their money and they should leave users the hell alone. There is a proud history of hacking one's PC and poking big brother in the eye, don't forget that!

I walked up to my laptop and in the upper-left corner of the screen Cortana wants me to try ordering Star Wars tickets. Fuck you Cortana, don't tell me what to do!!!!


It's called Hacker News, not Script Kiddie News, and the difference between understanding what you're doing (or at least, doing something with the intent of learning something from it) and running someone else's code without understanding what it does is pretty much the demarcation point between being a hacker and being a script kiddie.


As it has always been and always will be. Some will blindly run it, some will review it before running it, some download just to rip out the bits and pieces they like. Some just want to understand the OS...


It is never black and white. Moving to Linux would only be feasible when the vast software library is available on Linux, including, but not limited to, productivity, games, media playback, drivers (hardware support). In the mean time, scripts like these fill holes that should not be there in Windows.

I do agree that people executing this script should not only rely on "it's open source, so smart people will look at it and find issues", but actually research and fully understand what is going on.


Very few Linux users understand what all those daemons are doing on their system. I certainly don't, and - albeit a long long time ago (kernel 2.4) - I even wrote Linux kernel code (networking: firewall and NAT).


"untrusted" by who? You?

I have a bit of a pet peeve about the word "untrusted", because it leaves open who is doing the trusting.


I tend to agree. Things like this will most likely break in the future.

They will be undone, they can cause deeper issues in the OS, and they can in some cases cause vulnerabilities.

I see this a lot with chrome. People will load it up with extensions, then blame the browser when something doesn't work.

I'm not saying don't ever use it, but remember this if you start having weird issues, or one day the changes are undone.

It doesn't mean MS is out to get you, they just don't support those who are changing undocumented internals and don't need to announce hen they change some undocumented internal registry entry.


I understand pretty much everything in here (and have manually disabled most of the things this disables in the past), but the script serves as a useful checklist and shortcut. That's it's value.


Up voted for this:

"If you do not understand every single command in this thing, you should avoid it, and if you understand every single command in this, you don't need it."

It's so universally applicable!


" if you understand every single command in this, you don't need it." - Oh, I don't need it, but it's kind of convenient to have a reference of them, all in one repo.

Tool users, remember?


If I don't understand every single line of code and algorithm in any piece of OSS I use, do you feel as though I don't need it? Not starting a flamewar with this question, I'm genuinely curious


Not true - automation is great! I understand the script and would use it.


Agree -- people are missing the point that this stuff would easily take over an hour to do manually in the GUI.


> If you do not understand every single command in this thing, you should avoid it, and if you understand every single command in this, you don't need it.

So... you're saying that if you do know all this stuff, then you should manually type it all in a shell window (or hunt down in a gui) on every win10 box you want to administer?


So people shouldn't use any software they didn't write on their own?


There's a difference between running a signed executable from a source you trust versus running something you don't trust. There's a difference between running code with ordinary privileges and running code with elevated privileges. The best-case scenario is signed code from a trusted source with ordinary privileges.


A good general one to rip out the bloatware is:

  Get-AppxPackage ** | Remove-AppxPackage
Safe but sometimes you have to execute it restart and execute it again for seemingly no reason but it works and won't damage anything. Run powershell as admin.

EDIT: A cursory glance of the script doesn't show anything dangerous. It may do thinks you don't want though but PowerShell's pretty decent to understand what's going on even if you don't know the commands specifically.


It doesn't have to be malicious to be dangerous, it can just be wrong. Nobody's running a test suite on these things whenever a Windows update comes down, nobody's testing them on a wide array of Windows configurations, and from the ones I've seen before, they can cause problems with your PC.


There are other applications which do something similar to the one linked here. Destroy Windows 10 Spying, to name an example. This is a GUI app. Does the same apply? Are the default options not sane? Did you read and understand every line of all software you run?


Be careful, this breaks things. I ran this when I first switched to Windows 10, and I found that it killed search in the start menu, certain control panel applets that relied on the metro framework, and somehow, VSS.


It rips out all the metro apps. It does nothing to cortana so that's confusing. VSS?


You can check the source code of the script.

You can not check the source code of windows.

Who of those could have something to hide?


I don't consider win10 telemetry that bad. You can dial it down a lot until it's just sending crash data when thing go bad. Pretty much all OSes have this.

What I really don't like however is Microsoft pushing garbage like candy crush to my machine without my consent.


What's the problem with telemetry in general? For almost all of the important products I use I like to send usage info -- my expectation is that they're more likely to improve features that I use as a result.

And if you use a web app, e.g., Google Apps, they get all this data plus more (and completely not anonymized).


The biggest part of the problem is not being able to turn it off. I don't think most people would be bothered by the basic telemetry if this was an option for non-enterprise / education users.

That and not being able to see what it's sending out. I recently took a close look at the Privacy control panel on my iPhone. Not only does it give the option of turning off telemetry and ad data, but it also shows you exactly what is being sent back to the mothership.

This is what Windows 10 needs.


That's fine and I have no problem with telemetry being enabled by default. But there are lots of reasons users might want to shut it off.

A big one is that some people are on metered connections and that telemetry can cost money.


Don't want any extra network usage when i'm connected to my cell phone hotspot and using up my monthly data cap.


windows has a 'metered' mode for network connections. I don't know if this will stop said usage, but you could check


That's not true. Install and run wireshark then dial all you want, there will always be traffic every other minute or so to one of Redmond's servers from just idling.


I did just that, cannot reproduce.

Did you actually try this or is this based on one of those articles about the open beta of Windows 10 that had a lot more telemetry you couldn't disable?


I'll be the devil's advocate this time.

As you can see in gpedit, Cortana and Web Search is disabled. Why does explorer.exe need to access akamai or search.msn?

http://imgur.com/a/yiIxn


Some of those GPO policies no longer work, they're legacy.

Instead: Click Search, Hamburger Menu, Settings, Uncheck "Search Online and Include Web Results."

If you have OneDrive installed Explorer keeps a constant connection to Microsoft's servers to populate your OneDrive folders into the navigation pane.


OneDrive is also disabled, and your claim about GPO policies is blatantly nonsense, since that's what you use for Enterprise deployments.

Also, if you had actually researched before publishing, you'd known that Microsoft removed the disable option from the Hamburger menu during the Anniversary Update.

This is not a conspiracy theory but Microsoft blatantly crossing the line, I personally don't care since I'm not interested in joining the arms race against Telemetry, but not being able to easily disable an annoying persistent connection certainly leaves you a bad taste in your mouth.


> your claim about GPO policies is blatantly nonsense, since that's what you use for Enterprise deployments.

It says right in the GPO policies which operating systems they apply to. For example in your screenshot you set "Do not allow web search" to quote the policy itself that only applies to:

> Microsoft Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003 with Windows Search version 3.01 or later

Doesn't do anything on Windows 10. So it isn't "blatantly nonsense." You are just playing with pro functionality you don't understand.

> Also, if you had actually researched before publishing, you'd known that Microsoft removed the disable option from the Hamburger menu during the Anniversary Update.

Nope. http://i.imgur.com/nzHBVex.png

As you can see I am on 10.0.14393 which is the Anniversary Retail Release and have the option.


Your point about various GPO settings being version specific is absolutely correct.

I will say that I definitely do not want to manage options via clicky-click. Local policy editing (and domain group policies in the enterprise) have been a replicable, scalable way to manage settings in a Windows environment since at least XP/Server 2003 (the earliest Windows client + server environments I've admin'd IIRC).

Configuration outside of LP/GP doesn't scale particularly well beyond personal use, I'd say and as such I get what the other poster was driving at.


The only thing I didn't do is to block MS servers in System32\Drivers\etc\hosts file. This is useless in my opinion, MS can always change them or add new ones.


Didn't they 'hack' it so it ignores MS servers listed in hosts file?


Curious about this too as I heard the same thing.


not hacked, just hardcoded IPs as a fallback path when resolving telemetry domains fails.


Good lord.


That didn't answer my question at all.

You said above:

> That's not true. Install and run wireshark then dial all you want, there will always be traffic every other minute or so to one of Redmond's servers from just idling.

I literally did exactly what you said. Shutdown all third party applications on a Windows 10 Pro machine, loaded Wireshark 2.2.3, filtered out all LAN traffic/broadcast traffic/etc and watched. Didn't see any traffic at all going to Microsoft nor anyone else, it is still running now and not a peep.

Now I have no doubt that if I waited long enough I would, since I have Windows Update enabled, use Microsoft for time synchronisation, and a handful of other things. But it definitely isn't "every other minute." I cannot reproduce that.


This is interesting, because I just did the same thing and there is plenty of garbage flying around to various akamai hosts every 20-60 minutes.

Is your system volume license or retail?


Retail. 10 Pro specifically.


Mine was activated as Win 7 upgrade to 10 during the Insider Program. Tested clean install in VM right now.

Maybe Microsoft tracks this and forces my in theory Retail copy to still act like some sort of guinea pig :/


Fair enough. From what I recall, the traffic was going to telemetry servers not time sync. Next time I play with Windows I'll holdon to the capture logs for proof.

I think the other side effect from all those regedit hacks was issues with Windows updates. In the end, my machine got stuck at installing October patches, rebooting then failing at 99% applying the patch, rebooting again, rolling back the patch, rebooting, trying to install the patch again. The non-stop CPU usage and reboots made me quit Windows for awhile.


What I don't get is, why do they have to store the telemetry data encrypted locally. Why can't I see what my computer is sending off.


Presumably so that other applications can't mine telemetry for nefarious reasons.


You might have stronger thoughts about your choice of OS if you saw what they really knew and stored.


Will you consider it bad if it sends a crash of your executable with all debug info/source code in it to Microsoft? How about it you are developing a competing product to microsoft one?


The low level of telemetry you're talking about is only available in Windows 10 Enterprise (good luck finding it) or Server editions, you need to set a GPO to get it.


My linux install does not have "telemetry" (which is really just a polite word for what people used to call "spyware").


Spyware and telemetry are not the same. Do you really think they are exactly the same?


Unremoveable software that is using my computer in ways I don't want it used? Yeah, I'd call it the same thing.


"Unremoveable" by all definitions but the dictionary one.


Really? So tell me how to remove all of their software, and make sure that it doesn't come back to my system. I'm not even being sarcastic when I say I'd love to see proof that it can be done.


You can't provide that guarantee for any software that can update itself, Ubuntu could turn it back on tomorrow. This link shows you how to remove it now, I'm sure people give up on updating guides like this in the future.

Currently it is possibly and easy to remove telemetry. And it only takes a few clicks to disable auto-update for Windows 10 by setting your wifi to metered, and a Google search to set your ethernet to metered.


Possible and easy?

I have to tweak the registry via shitty scripts like this one. Thats the opposite of how an OS should work


Incorrect. You could also use the default windows administration process of editing the Group Policy locally, or setting it via your domain controller. It only uses the registry here because that's the simplest way to do it with a script on any kind of machine setup.

If you'd rather do it manually, these steps do the same thing: http://i.imgur.com/HnFpmE6.png

Start > [group policy] > [enter] > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > All Settings > Allow Telemetry


Which, AFAIR, is only available on certain versions of Windows?

Additionally, has anyone checked to see if these same keys are changed by using lgpe?


That's why i said "any machine setup". The Home version does not have the Group Policy Editor, because it is not intended for people who should be messing with such things. And for people who have the knowledge, or the drive to mess with such things, keys for both Home and Pro go for ~16€ on amazon.de

> has anyone checked to see if these same keys are changed by using lgpe?

It does not touch the Wow6432Node entry, but given that as far as i know that exists for compatibility for 32 bit programs, i'm not sure it is necessary. Or it might be mirrored in by some kind of maintenance process.


How about "software that is using my computer in ways I don't want it used, inextricable from the software that I require"?


Yes, but the post is about Windows 10, not Linux.


My Ubuntu install has telemetry. It also defaults to sending information to Amazon.


I am pretty sure they removed that default in the new versions of Ubuntu.


We shouldn't have to fight the OS, this is ridiculous.

Before moving definitively to Linux I'm considering installing a proxy on my router, bloc all ports except one and just redirect Firefox and a few apps that need connectivity to this port.

I'm not a network guy though, might be complicated.


>We shouldn't have to fight the OS, this is ridiculous.

I know what you mean, but as a Linux user, I feel like I'm spending a fair amount of time fighting the OS, too..


You'll either fight it because it doesn't manage power property on your new laptop or you'll fight it because it shows bing on your start menu or sends telemetry about what apps you run.

I'm not going to argue which is "worse" but I sure prefer to switch a few reg keys to stay ahead of Microsoft, to scouring forums trying to figure out what well hidden lever I need to pull to just get the hardware working.

You'll be fighting the OS either way - I'm picking this (easy) fight.


Stuff like this is fundamentally unworkable when the people pushing software updates are your adversaries. They already do stuff like ignore DNS settings and firewall rules to send harvested data back to microsoft. They will almost certainly break anything this does in the future too...


Exactly. Windows 10 has a hard coded whitelist of IPs and donain names in the kernel mode part of the OS (it's 64bit, it's signed, you can't modify it) - those IPs and domains will be ignored from your hosts file or firewall rules. Good luck with an hardware firewall attached to your Win10 notebook. ...unrealistic, so it's wise to stay with Win7 (minus some telemetry updates). I hope Android/Fuchsia, and other desktop OS come along until 2020, or MSFT CEO gets fired and they make a 180 degree u-turn.


Rather than continuing to struggle against these features which will continue to be added, why not use an operating system that respects your freedom?


As someone who uses the big three desktops daily, freedom is just one facet. I also want an operating system that respects my time. None of the free operating systems out there do that.

Considering the state of Ubuntu, probably the "easiest" to use desktop out there at the moment, my freedom is second to my ability to get a working desktop.


>I also want an operating system that respects my time.

Reminds me of this video (Free as in free time; the freedom less mentioned by free software evangelists.) by Louis Rossmann: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOjCJXHJhPg


We must be doing very different things. Outside of gaming, everything I do is as fast or faster to get done on Linux.


The problem isn't execution speed, it is the time you have to spend getting thinks to work properly. Linux doesn't necessarily work straight out of the box, and you may have to spend hours getting it to work properly with your hardware setup.


Ubuntu has worked more or less out of the box since its first release.

Windows routinely would take hours to install, -and that would be a "pre-installed" image from the vendor.

Lately things have gotten a lot better but I have never chosen Linux because of freedom but rather always because of simplicity and usability .

Then again, usability is in they eye of the beholder it seems.


I'm not talking about execution speed. Out of the box, it takes me a lot longer to make a Windows system usable than a Linux system.


No to condescend, but that just means that what you do most likely only has to do with programming. If you attempt to branch out into other fields of activities, Linux software is just not capable enough. Try to edit a photo beyond the basic capabilities of Gimp. Try to author a video project. Try to master audio. Try to design and edit documents beyond the most basic capabilities of LibreOffice. Attempt spreadsheet workflows.

It's just not there. But yes, if you want to run Python, GCC or Ruby from the commandline, Linux is very capable of giving you a faster experience.


> No to condescend, but that just means that what you do most likely only has to do with programming.

Well, yeah, but I never claimed that Linux would be suitable for everyone's uses; just mine.

Image editing: I've never needed more than the Gimp. Why would I pay for something like Photoshop, full of features that I'll never use? It'd be like buying a power tool to assemble Ikea furniture.

Video project: I did a little in Windows XP with Windows Movie Maker, pasting together porn videos about 15 years ago, and conversions with stuff like Handbrake since then. I've never been inclined to do anything more advanced. It's not a need that I've had...but I've got Windows available if I did.

Try to master audio: Audacity covered all that I used to do, but honestly, I haven't used it in 5 years or so. Oh, plus some of my own waveform-generating and mixing software (simple stuff like generating audio for video game emulators).

LibreOffice: It, and previously OpenOffice, have covered every single need that I've had in the last 15 years. Granted, my needs have been simple, but I've never claimed differently.

It's as if I claimed that Windows is all I ever needed, and you came in asking how I intended to hack on the Linux kernel from Visual Studio...


I mentioned this is another comment, but it's worth saying again. For video/audio editing Blender can be used. Plus a bunch of other stuff, from their website:

"Blender is the free and open source 3D creation suite. It supports the entirety of the 3D pipeline—modeling, rigging, animation, simulation, rendering, compositing and motion tracking, even video editing and game creation."

Now its not the most intuitive pieces of software and you'll be spending a lot of time on youtube following tutorials, but its freely available and opensource.


Please let me know how editing goes for you on Blender on a semi advanced video project. These types of comments are the worst. It's on the same level as "Yes, GIMP is an alternative to Photoshop because it has brush and layers".


In the early 2000s, I had some awesome times learning Blender, and it's impressive how much farther it's been taken since being open-sourced!


The tiniest of examples: try to enable "advanced" typography features in a document, such as ligatures, small caps, proportional figures, mathematical equations – without having to convert your document into TeX.


> such as ligatures, small caps, proportional figures, mathematical equations

Out of those, I recognize "mathematical equations" as something I've ever tried, regardless of which software I've been using, and LibreOffice Math always fit my needs. The truth is, outside of programming, I don't use enough of the features of office software for it to make a difference which suite I use.

I'm not sure what you're trying to prove. That there are features in some Windows software that aren't in Linux software? Granted, but I don't see how that's relevant to my original comment.


Why "without having to convert your document into TeX"? Is there something wrong with TeX?

Anyway, LibreOffice has been able to do all these things for a long time with Graphite fonts, and, since version 5.3, it can also do them with OpenType fonts.


I'd rather struggle with some Windows warts than reverse engineer my drivers.

I'm not the kind of guy who would found a Free Software Foundation because of some Xerox printer drivers.


> I'd rather struggle with some Windows warts than reverse engineer my drivers.

I'd guess that any *nix user who reverse engineer their own drivers in 2017 does so because they want to and/or have a job that pays them to do so (most likely handsomely).

For the rest of us at least mainstream Linux distros are almost as easy as Windows if not easier in some cases (until you come to MS Office, AutoCAD etc which is a whole different story, mostly unrelated to drivers IMO.)


> For the rest of us at least mainstream Linux distros are almost as easy as Windows if not easier in some cases (until you come to MS Office, AutoCAD etc which is a whole different story, mostly unrelated to drivers IMO.)

I.E. Unless you need to use mainstream business software.


Agree, but even that seems to start thawing up as web based software spreads.

Right now I only miss MS Office and given recent moves from MS it wouldn't surprise if a preview is available within a year.


> have a job that pays them to do so (most likely handsomely).

Nope, that's just fiction, the awesomely rewarded jobs are boring banking systems written in plain old Windows Forms (or WPF/Angular if you're lucky).

Most jobs would send you with HR to have a serious talk if they found out you lost a week reverse engineering a display link docking station because your multi-monitor setup wouldn't run after installing Fedora in your job laptop.

But that's none of my business. Kids are free to believe in Santa.

> For the rest of us at least mainstream Linux distros are almost as easy as Windows if not easier in some cases.

You usually install Linux because you enjoy working with the terminal, not because it's easy to use, but I certainly understand where do you come from. Ubuntu has done an amazing job to lower the barrier to start using Linux.


> Most jobs would send you with HR to have a serious talk if they found out you lost a week reverse engineering a display link docking station because your multi-monitor setup wouldn't run after installing Fedora in your job laptop.

That would be reasonable, if Linux development isn't your job.

And if you do it for the fun of it I say of course you should do it on your own time.

> But that's none of my business. Kids are free to believe in Santa.

Unnecessary attempt at an insult IMO.

>> For the rest of us at least mainstream Linux distros are almost as easy as Windows if not easier in some cases.

> You usually install Linux because you enjoy working with the terminal, not because it's easy to use, but I certainly understand where do you come from. Ubuntu has done an amazing job to lower the barrier to start using Linux.

Plain wrong IMO: I can interact with a terminal all I want without installing Linux just by running putty. In fact I prefer gui for most things except sysadmin stuff.


Just in reply to your first paragraph, there is more than one type of well-paying programming job...


It's no struggle; someone wrote a PowerShell script and posted it to Hacker News!

More serious answer: I do use other OSs. But I keep using Windows because I want access to the fruits of millions of man-hours spent in Redmond and elsewhere developing for the Windows platform. It's a non-trivial body of work.


Tell that to my employer! Sometimes we don't get to choose our OS, but my personal PC is running Ubuntu. This script is a treasure trove of commands that just killed off over a dozen annoying and undesirable Windows behaviours that I haven't had the time to hunt down.


Games and Photoshop


Add Evernote / OneNote for me.


tbh I mainly use windows cus of the great selection of pirate software available for it :p

EDIT: ps. I know Linux has great, more or less equivalent, free or very cheap software available but I'm too lazy to learn that other software.

EDIT2: I think perhaps a lot of windows users might fall into my category.


Money.


I recommend using Spybot Anti-Beacon [1], which is a safe way of disabling (or enabling) Windows 10 features.

[1] https://www.safer-networking.org/spybot-anti-beacon/


Nice haven't tried that. I use Shutup10 https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10


I also use Shutup10, which is essentially the same as the script only with a friendly GUI that lets you choose exactly what you want to do.


Is this open-source?


No that's the only caveat. I much prefer to use scripts, as these programs are a bit of a black box. But at least they're digitally signed and recommended by the wider Windows 'powertoy' community so you're allowed to trust them.


If isn't opensource You can't trust it.


In that case you wouldn't be using Windows at all then, issue resolved.


So clever... but how you know that this software is not some kind of adware... (Super Ugly things, on this kind of tools... )


I can look at my network traffic though. It also tells you exactly what registry keys or HOSTS entries are being added, which you can verify.


Nonsense.

If it is open source, that doesn't make it automatically trustworthy. If it isn't open source, you can trust it as much as you trust the author(s). Open source and trust are separate things.


Windows 10 is not open source.


If telemetry really bothers you, I think you'd be better off with a different OS


Which one? An essentially unsupported Linux distribution? Canonical does telemetry as well. Apple has been doing this for years an yet we still don't sweat wrathful spate of headlines over it.

Oh and by the way, the logfiles from most package servers provide an accurate description of what you're doing with your machine and a weak concept of identity. So you'll need to avoid those.

Browsers keep updating and the vast majority of websites collect telemetry as well. So no more internet.

But yeah, the OS app level telemetry seems like a pretty big deal and we should stress out about it.


Why is Canonical the only option here? There's plenty of other Linux choices that don't use telemetry.

Also, if you use a browser that respects your privacy, and treats you like an adult, then you can turn that telemetry off.


If only they bothered to support modern laptops as well as Ubuntu does.


Bullshit. I've had a better experience with Ubuntu than with Windows 10. And since Ubuntu 16.04 the telementary thing you were talking about is desabled by default. Or you could use other Ubuntu derivate, like Xubuntu.


I think your definition of "good experience" and mine differ substantially then.

Because if getting 1/2 the battery life if I want CUDA support is pretty shit in my opinion.


> Canonical does telemetry as well.

Apart from their short flirt with Amazon (which is now long gone), what else do they do apart from package updates?

There are also major distributions like Fedora and Debian which never did this.

Please stop spreading your FUD.


Oh and by the way, the logfiles from most package servers provide an accurate description of what you're doing with your machine and a weak concept of identity.

Those "package servers" are distributed mirror networks with no central entity being able to read all the logs.


Windows has a standard logging infrastructure across all apps, ETW, which can also be used for telemetry.


Yeah, that's what I don't get about posts like this. You can either be indifferent with (legal) telemetry collection in which case you don't need posts like this or you are not comfortable with the idea in which case you shouldn't be using windows to begin with.

You can go through all the hops, run every script out there and Microsoft can push a new update tomorrow that will put you back on square one. So why even bother when you can't ever be really sure you achieved what you wanted and for how long.


Like what? OSX and Ubuntu have this too.


Ubuntu is not the only Linux distribution. Slackware is great if you want an OS that literally only does what you tell it to. Ditto OpenBSD if you're even more paranoid about telemetry.

Granted, they aren't for beginners, but that's the sliding scale in action.


Which telemetry on macOS is not opt-in?

Looking at this script there are seems like many more vectors on Windows then macOS and Ubuntu.


It can be turned off. Not in Windows, only toned down a bit.


Careful, by default this disables the lock screen.


I've had a number of friends who have had to do reinstalls after running these kinds of scripts. Easy to break lots of subtle things.


Yeah, my first Windows 10 install I did a lot of the things in this script (disable Cortana, Bing search, P2P updates, etc.) and my machine worked fine... for a time. Things slowly started to go REALLY downhill, to the point where I couldn't search the start menu and had to find the .exe for any application I wanted to open, I couldn't view any images with the default image viewer, the file explorer barely worked, and a whole bunch of other weird things.

Eventually I gave up, reformatted the drive it was installed on, and re-installed. Everything's been pretty much fine since then.


It's editable. There's a lot of stuff in there I had to remove. I still want Store functionality because I like the look and feel of the apps on there, especially the Twitter client.


The login screen where you input you password, or the lockscreen where you have to press spacebar to "slide up" the image to get to the login screen? For some reason Windows 10 has both even on desktop.


Disabling the lock screen was about the only thing I wasn't sure about, I'd be pretty happy with the rest. Any idea why you would want the lock screen disabled?


No it doesn't. At least on Anniversary Update but is anyone else running an earlier version of Windows?

The NoLockScreen hack does not work in Anniversary Update. It's even described in the gist and the Anniversary workaround is commented out.


> but is anyone else running an earlier version of Windows?

Anyone who has one of the new netbooks that have 32 GB drives, because it's hard to get 16 GB free to install the update.



If you prefer a Batch script there's also Make Windows 10 Great Again: https://gist.github.com/IntergalacticApps/675339c2b805b4c9c6...


Has a nice list of IP addrs and hostnames... thanks!


I wonder what MS employees think when every week a new tool pops up disabling data mining in their OS.


I'm guessing "lol you think the data mining is actually disabled now, Mr. Smith of St. Louis SSN 291-52-xxxx, who prefers to have taco night on wednesdays, and does most of his online shopping sunday mornings."


Joke's on them.

Microsoft probably just bought that info from my Android location history.


I doubt it affects them that much, as there's always going to be powerusers. They get a lot of their telemetry from unsuspecting users / laymen buying those cheap Windows10 tablets you see everywhere now.


Actually, a good part of the data collection is for having crashdumps to actually fix bugs. Not that many people write feedback.


I'm an enigneer on Windows. We actually use the crash dumps and the more the better so we can prioritize reliability bugs. Usage telemetry helps us prioritize work, like which settings to migrate from Control Panel to Settings first, or to see if design changes actually made things better for people.


How do engineers there feel about the fact that the data is encrypted so users don't even know what MS knows about them, and how those interested in privacy have to resort to something like this?


Unfortunately, the admirable removal of reliability bugs is in the same breath as migrating settings away from Control Panel, when the latter is another one of the things reducing the quality of the Microsoft/Windows experience.


He didn't say "away".


This reminds me of the Tron project

https://reddit.com/r/TronScript


I don't recommend anyone to use all the script. Dial telemetry down to Basic and then disable Cortana.


A vast majority is Registry config values, could have avoided the powershell "version" here.


Warning: i tried turning Cortana off by following some powershell scripts (not this one though). ended up she's still on, but now my search functionality is broken. Nothing I did could fix it. Guess I need to reinstall windows if I ever want to get that back.


I seem to remember a few other apps and scripts that do the same thing, but I also heard that they get out of date pretty quickly. Don't know if this is going to keep up with the updates, but it shows that this is an ongoing problem with Windows10.


the script changes some registry settings - did you check that it really stops snooping if you just set the registry settings and reboot? What if another update just enables the snooping back regardless of the registry setting?


anybody knows why Microsoft joined in with the data gathering? this move might alienate their corporate customers and that's the real cash cow, don't they make enough money out of licensing? They say that Mr. Nadella is such a smart guy, but this really looks like a way to loose existing business.


I have something like this for macOS turning off iCloud and killing .DS_store files, among other annoyances. I wouldn't recommend running this as is (neither does the author) but it's a nice list to pick and choose options from.


Pity he missed the related shell scripts for the Apple and Google operating systems.


Is it possible to disable the screen magnifier? I press it several times a day by accident and it's really tricky to switch off...


- Launch "Ease of Access Center", either from control panel or search in start menu.

- Click Make the computer easier to see.

- Uncheck the option Turn on Magnifier and click on Save


Oh I thought that turned it on (not enabled the shortcut). Will try that. Thanks.


> Restrict Windows Update P2P only to local network

I find this interesting as a security choice rather than completely disabling P2P updates, as I'd guess that a substantial number of users aren't in control of all machines on their network, and if the other computers on the network got their updates from peers outside the network, then you'll still end up getting the updates from those peers. Is completely disabling P2P updates not an option?


It's a real question of how well it detects your /local/ network versus being on that over a third party VPN.

For desktops local network is fine.

For laptops it should be a no-go.


Useless unless it also includes a way to prevent your privacy from being invaded my Google, Amazon, et al. Just more fear mongering from the ye old anti-Microsoft camp, (founded 1995).


Hello, can anybody explain in simple words what this script does? How will it affect the behavior of my windows installation? Should I run it?

Thanks !


It will disable a lot of the Windows 10 telemetry features. Those are the features that send a bunch of data about your usage back to Microsoft. This includes Cortana and the Bing search tool in the normal windows search for example.

If you want to run it you should read through it first, it says above every function what it is going to disable. I would go with a simple rule: If you don't understand it, don't disable it. Otherwise it contains code for enabling all features again in case you start to miss something.

Edit: especially UI part seems to disable a lot of things by default that you might not want to disable!


I'd like PowerShell more if it wasn't MixedCase.


It's not, you can do everything in lowercase. Still sucks.




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