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Github enterprise edition. Not the cloud service.

Depends on how many of your companies shares are held by the current board and management team...

Nothing breaks a company faster than switching out senior leaders every few months.

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If your senior leadership is leaving because of short term volatility in their options, is that really the senior leadership you want in your company?

In addition, senior leadership has significantly less liquidity in their options in a privately held company.

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I think he meant that the shareholders will replace the senior leadership because of short term volatility, unless you only sell a minority to the public.

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Is your message handling a linear deal over the month? They may process 1.5M of those in the last 8 hours of the day, which would be 3750 requests a second instead...

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I'm not sure how you arrived at this 3750 per second number.

Processing 1.5 million messages for ⅓ of the time (1500000 messages / 30d / 8h / 60m / 60s) is an average of 1.7361 messages per second during those 8 hours per day. If the remaining 500k messages were spread evenly over the remaining 16 hours a day for a month, that's an average of 0.963 messages per second ((((500000 / 30 / 8 / 60 / 60 )×2)+1.7361)/3) over the entire month.

Even if you were to process 1.5million messages during the last 8 hours of the month, that is only 52.08 ( 1500000 messages / 8h / 60m / 60s ) messages per second during that 8 hour period.

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I, uh, don't know how I got that either (must have fat fingered in calc). I was talking about all in one 8 hour deal though. Thanks for the clarification.

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You dramatically misunderstand VPC. Everybody on AWS today uses VPC, unless you happened to be grandfathered in to EC2 'classic'. There is NO COST to using VPC (aside from admin over head maybe?). It's a huge security upgrade, as it gives you the ability to isolate things much better.

The specifics of HIPAA/HITECH compliance on AWS are available under their BAA (which is confidential), and do require some things that cost more money. VPC is not one of them.

If you have only a quarter rack of servers and want the minimum s for physical security, yeah, you can probably make that work cheaper than AWS. When you have a whole datacenter worth of gear and now need a more sophisticated security / entry system, etc. the argument becomes much closer.

With that said, you misunderstanding how VPC works and what it is makes me wonder if your pricing is coming out right: it's really complicated to price out a full AWS cost, just as much as to price out your own costs.

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GP is most likely referring to VPCs with dedicated tenancy. Those are not free, and they're pricey [0].

  [0]: http://docs.aws.amazon.com/AmazonVPC/latest/UserGuide/dedicated-instance.html

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GP is refeerring to the dedicated instance requirement of having a BAA with AWS. It costs $2 per hour per region on top of your existing server costs.

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It is $2/hour. So about $1500/mo plus regular AWS charges.

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In my head I meant $2/hour but $2/day came out instead. Thank you for correcting me!

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Sorry. Meant vps.

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The 'calorie count' website score is about the healthiness of the meal, not the quality of meat. McNuggets are the same chicken, just with way more breading, and therefore more fat/salt/etc., so 'less healthy'.

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Sure, but you aren't eating feet and beaks, just breast meat.

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The alternative is what we have in infosec: the folks in charge of 'cyber' in the govt don't have a clue, because they have no background or connections to the 'industry' or technology at all. And it's a total disaster.

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Metadata collection is only bad when it's the Government doing it!

FWIW: I've not received anything but EFF-related spam from EFF to the email address I used to donate to them back in the day.

Not sure about ACLU.

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Governments can use force on those they track. Corporations can't yet (they're working on that).

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At the same time, the government has little reason to hassle people who aren't fringe minorities. Private companies have strong incentives to use data collection against the masses.

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I don't buy either side of that statement. Government does hassle the masses, and I'm not sure what incentives private companies have to use data collection on the masses. My argument for the latter is probably a little weak, but certainly in the former, history is clear.

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> I'm not sure what incentives private companies have to use data collection on the masses.

Have you met FaceBook?

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Which government, and during what time period?

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Of course, collecting metadata -- especially via centralized services like Google Analytics -- means you're creating a very tempting trove of information for both the government and private entities that may make use of it to your users' disadvantage.

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I'd love to hear how folks are actually deploying Golang for web apis - using Gorilla, net/http, etc?

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Like the others, net/http with gorilla packages pulled in as needed. Nginx for static files and a reverse proxy for go. Upstart, and that's about it!

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First one I deployed I used martini but now I'd just use the net/http lib and pull in a few gorilla libs as needed.

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I've created a simple solution for a few projects I'm working on, it's a kind of REST service wrapper.

Basically, I have a "service" package that offers:

* mux routing

* Negroni for middleware (with stats and auth middlewares delivered out of the box)

* a centralised logger

* Rendering of things to JSON

* An idea of controllers (a controller is a web handler for a given route, handling all verbs)

* An idea of handlers on those controllers (per verb... you basically just load in your GET or POST handlers here)

* HEAD and OPTIONS for free (including automatic Allow headers)

* Error handling returns JSON throughout, including 404s, etc

* Basic filling of structs with POST'd/PUT'd JSON

The thing is fairly primitive, and it's Go idiomatic and so doesn't provide a context for the middleware and handlers, but it just allows one to rapidly say "this struct, to this controller, on this route" and the rest is for free.

This is just a starting ground though, a test of an idea. If I can package this better and have it be a little less hacky in nature I'll look to open-sourcing it. Right now it's really just testing the idea of taking all of the cross-cutting concerns and common issues and solving them via this service package I've made, with the goal of just letting us get on with writing the business logic.

I want to expand it... with better description of errors, standard schemas for arrays being returned, auto-documentation of the endpoints (perhaps Swagger, but it seems awfully monolithic in nature), etc.

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Nginx and net/http has worked wonderfully for me. Nothing fancy is necessary.

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Upstart + net/http

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We're using either Gin[0] or pure net/http with Julian Schmidt's HttpRouter[1]. Even Gin lives on top of net/http, and most serious routers/frameworks do.

[0] https://github.com/gin-gonic/gin

[1] https://github.com/julienschmidt/httprouter

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I have multiple Go apps on my Linode server. I use nginx as a reverse proxy. Each Go app listens on a different port.

I use supervisor to start/stop my Go programs. I also use it for log rotate and to autostart my programs on a system reboot.

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The VA system detects how many cars are waiting to ensure that as many as possible make it through in a cycle (up to a limit), not detecting them as they are inbound to keep the light green.

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That's a familiar system, but it requires a car to come to nearly a full stop before the sensor picks it up. This leads often to the lights alternating so out of phase it produces the maximum delay for both streets.

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That also pre-supposes that openstack implementations are interoperable.

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