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Exactly. I'm trying to use other browsers too and stuff like these, like the way how ctrl+tab works, or, especially!!!, tabs thumbnails (seriously, this is the best thing ever) are keeping me coming back to Opera

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Use Ghostery (http://www.ghostery.com/) or Do Not Track (http://www.abine.com/dntdetail.php), or various others addons like these, and you will have the problem partially solved.

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Americans don't walk around being sad, unless something bad happens to be sad about. In fact, sad Russians look stupid wearing sad-face all the time.

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Yeah, I don't think Americans look stupid. I was just explaining the cultural difference.

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What company/companies are threating their workers better and how do you know that? I seriously want to know, not just asking to undermine your point.

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Me too, I am considering to leave the macbooks (sadly) to support my principles but it is not an easy task to find a company that threat their workers better.

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Because this thread is becoming heated, I am going to bow out. But before I do, I looked into how companies reacted after the 2009 Foxconn stories and based my decision on who reacted, what they admitted, and incidents associated with them since then. Remember, not all Foxconn employees are forced to work with the same chemicals or conditions. Also, Toshiba doesn't use them at all. (I went with another brand, but am walking away because the Apple fanboys are in a mood today...)

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According to this text: http://prawo.vagla.pl/node/9637 (in Polish, from a lawyer who is against ACTA), there was no real attack on any of the mentioned sites, it was just that there was so much interest in the case that some sites went down due to naturally increased traffic. Case in point: his own website went down, even though he is against ACTA.

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Well, so let's be more specific about the alleged attack.

1) At least one target was attacked quite literally. The website of the Polish Parliament was defaced and subsequently taken down by its admins.

[This is the supposed deface image: http://bit.ly/wkygL4. The caption reads "Nothing is impossible! Cheers, gentlemen!"]

2) ACTA is a very new thing to the wider public (even the "trendy" internet public). First, on Jan 20 it made the front page of the biggest newspaper of record, Gazeta Wyborcza. And today ACTA was mentioned in the main TV news program (Wiadomosci on TVP1). The latter almost certainly triggered a wave of searches and attempts to access various sites. In result many website failures (the lawyer's, the Panoptykon Foundation, perhaps even Ministry of Culture) can be attributed to a sudden spike in interest.

[The lawyer mentioned in previous post has stated specifically that he has investigated the nature of the traffic and it doesn't look like a DDoS. Which is kind of credible, since each machine participating in a DoS sends gazillions of requests from the same IP, so it's distinctive from a visitor sending like 5 requests in total.]

3) That said, it's not an outlandish assumption that someone also had their way with the biggest sites of the Polish Government. A DDoS could have contributed to the whole mess.

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how can you tell requests to a site with the intention to DoS it and the regular ones if they were promoting in-browser tools for regular people?

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The simplest way is to use netstat and check amount of connections from each host. If you see plenty hosts with many connections established, that's DDoS. If there is plenty hosts, but each one has few connections, thats DoS (aka slash dot effect), mentioned by Tomek_.

PS: DDoS - distributed denial-of-service attack. Deliberate attack which involves dedicated software; DoS - denial-of-service. Server can't handle all requests, because suddenly there is more of them (because of link on frontpage etc)

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They fought hard with the police and caused some real damage to some of the government buildings, but there was no kidnapping, or terror. Poland is not some wild, crazy country. Also, most of the society was against the protests and was literally pissed off on miners and on government (for the fact that they indeed agreed to most of the requests of the miners).

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That's exactly what I meant by terrorized. The miners did occupy Government building and they did destroy some of them and yes they did terrorize some of the high level Government officials by locking them up in their own offices and not allowing to get out.

Yes, Poland IS a wild country. That is its biggest strength. Poor Americans just have to deal with whatever laws thrown at them by their Government. Here, in Poland - not really.

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I think we just see the government (any) as an enemy and I agree it's pretty healthy. History teached us to do so but somehow still works.

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So we have Gnome3, Gnome2, KDE, Xfce, LXDE, Unity, this + gazillions more I don't even remember about.

Anyone still believes Linux has any chance on a desktop market?

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Gnome2 is dead.

Sure, it's still installed all over the place (just like Windows 98 and XP might be), but it is by all means a dead project.

Unity (and this fork, as I understand it) are based on Gnome (3!) and just replace the shell. So your list becomes

- Gnome (Gnome-Shell, Unity, this fork)

- KDE

- (list of minorities)

For me - while being a Gnome guy and preferring the gnome-shell option from that list - the choice doesn't really matter. It's as moot as arguments during the times of Windows XP were, about whether you should enable the classic mode or use the Luna theme.

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1) think the differences between those shells are much bigger than between Luna and classic in XP

2) that it's a different shell, not a fully different desktop environment isn't really that important, for a normal user it will already cause confusion (maybe even more as it requires additional explanation what's the difference between the two).

Don't get me wrong: the thing that you have a choice is one of the virtues of Linux, but at the same time what it causes is that:

a) Linux is doomed to fail on a mainstream desktop market

b) none of the available choices is and probably will never be as polished as commercial competitors (and fragmentation is one of the reasons of that)

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1) ~Maybe~. In absolutes, I agree. I don't think it matters much though.

2) Sticking with Windows comparisons: Moving from 98 to XP was different in quite some ways, to Vista and beyond was another change in lots of things.

We agree that choice is good. We disagree about whether there's too much choice right now. I see only two technical choices, KDE or Gnome, with the Gnome-Shell/Unity variants for the latter. No idea if this fork will prevail and be part of the list in the future.

The average user, the "grandma" that often comes up during these discussions, doesn't care. My gut feeling says that she'll end up with Ubuntu or Kubuntu installed (Maybe Mint. Maybe Fedora) and use what is available.

And quite frankly, what _is_ available is ready for every casual/average home user, in my opinion.

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Agreed. If "grandma" were to choose Ubuntu, she would have a good quality 140 page manual ready to download and dip into. See the Ubuntu-Manual project on launchpad for the Unity version (currently at alpha).

https://lists.launchpad.net/ubuntu-manual/msg02859.html

Is there a comparable tome ready for Gnome Shell based workflows? I'd really like to find one.

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http://library.gnome.org/, also included in GNOME 3.

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Looks good, somewhere between

https://help.ubuntu.com/11.10/ubuntu-help/index.html

and the paper manual. I especially like the keyboard hints embedded as they go along.

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Users don't read manuals. If you expect the user to read the manual to use your product, you have failed.

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Most office workers spend very little time interacting with the desktop. They'll have some office suite open, or they'll have their niche piece of software, or they'll be using some manufacturing / accounts (I'm trying to describe things like Sage Line 50, Line 100, etc) open.

The barrier to Linux on the desktop in that situation is not the desktop being used, but the main bit of software being used.

Provide Line 100 in Linux, or EMIS (Egton Medical Information Systems or similar) on Linux with some decent support system and you'd get a lot of uptake.

Remember that small offices (under 20 people) often have no IT department, they have the guy who knows about computers and a support contract. Other people won't know how to CC or BCC, or how to sort a column of numbers in a spreadsheet. See also Google showing that the vast majority of people were using the + operator incorrectly.

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In what context did people Google find that people were using + incorrectly? That would make sense in the search bar, because they changed it recently.

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Mentioned here (http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3239452)

But specifically in this sub-thread:

(http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=3239844)

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Thanks.

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Linux is a kernel. Your question could be rephrased as "We have Gnome 2, 3, KDE, XFCE, LXDE, Unity, Cinnamon, Android, WebOS, ChromeOS. Has any of these any chance on the desktop market?" and become meaningful.

Right now, I don't even think PCs as we know them - where we manage locally stored data and applications rather than the curated experiences popularized by Apple - will be a meaningful chunk of the market.

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Windows 7 has: Emerge, KDE4Win, Directory Opus, BumpTop, SharpEnviro, and Cairo. And it's doing OK.

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No, it's not faster now and it's no longer really used probably (don't know if smartphones, tablets, various consoles, etc. offer access to any equivalent of rsqrtps), but it was brilliant at its time (well, still is, it's just not very useful).

Remember, Quake was released in 1996, SSE came out in 1999.

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Anyone actually managed to find a link to pre-order?

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Have done in the uk http://tinypic.com/r/1zeflw3/5 There is a second page, but when ordered by price it's not available and I'm in a rush right now unfortunately.

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Exactly! For those who doesn't yet know, Richard Turley, creative director of Businessweek has a tumblr page where he puts magazine's covers from time to time. Worth to follow. Url: http://richardturley.tumblr.com/

Some of my favourites:

Khadafi: http://richardturley.tumblr.com/post/9373871854/now-about-th...

Bezos: http://richardturley.tumblr.com/post/10807034868/amazon-the-...

9/11: http://richardturley.tumblr.com/post/8470431158/been-a-bit-q...

Moynihan: http://richardturley.tumblr.com/post/9957165968/can-moynihan...

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