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This document reads like an enumerated list of why the web is better than apps for most things. Unfortunately, apps will likely prevail until OS producers work directly to empower the mobile web.



I don't think that Apple's walled garden approach to iOS apps applies to other OSes. Android has multiple alternative app stores and allows direct installation of app files without rooting.

And, frankly, I would hope that in general that apps win. Not the kinds of apps that are just a wrapper for a website necessarily, but for a great many things I'd prefer an app running on my hardware in a way that I can control with things like a firewall to some sort of cloud solution that I'm accessing through a browser.


> I don't think that Apple's walled garden approach to iOS apps applies to other OSes.

Windows Phone 8.1 & Windows RT 8.1?


I've never used a Windows phone, I just assumed that they didn't have one because I never heard any complaining. Still, the android family of OSes is the major competition, and they are very decidedly not using a walled garden.


http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windowsphone/develop...

They do have similar, perhaps not quite as bad guidelines. However most don't complain because iOS is way more popular as a target.


This list of rules seems like a case of ban everything with selective enforcement. Then if Apple ends up wanting to remove an app, the app has surely broken at least one rule.


Indeed.

It also contains a severe condescending tone how 'big daddy' is doing all this for our own well being. And of course, think of all the children!


It's a blaming tone. "And we think that you will also know it when you cross it." is a statement that will assuredly not be true for everyone whom they believe 'crossed a line'.



Since it's probably past the point of being editable, I just want to put the standard "conflict of interest"/"shameless plug" disclaimer on this parent comment, since it was posted by one of my colleagues at famo.us. We'll make sure to better disclose these things next time.

That being said, the approaches we're exploring with famo.us (a retain-mode scene graph) is absolutely essential for allowing web apps to compete with native apps. This approach is often overlooked by web developers who grew up on the web and are not familiar with how native windowing and retain-mode UI systems function.


>apps will likely prevail until OS producers work directly to empower the mobile web

So you want web apps that are not web apps (with special hooks to the hardware and native features etc).

Having your cake and eating it too in other words.


> So you want web apps that are not web apps (with special hooks to the hardware and native features etc).

Is that an unreasonable thing to expect? HTML touch events are provided by a special hook to the hardware and/or OS. The same applies to audio/video elements, WebGL, geolocation, websockets, and any number of other APIs. That's just how the web platform has been developing, and there's no reason to think it will stop.


With each day I get stronge feeling that "the web" has some identity crisis. It's like a sumo wrestler who suddenly decided he should be a gymnast. I am already missing the web tech for the web not some ass-backwards usage of it to make apps.


Maybe we need to reinvent the app layer. Half the reason web apps are such a good choice (currently) is because of strong sandboxing that allows dynamic code to run locally and consistent display standards.

If someone could replicate those on an app layer that wasn't the DOM and javascript, so you could simply link to a URL and download and run an app with high performance I reckon we could stop abusing the web.

Still a pretty tall order though.


There's no point having cake if you can't eat it.


Yes but you cant both have it and have eaten it at the same time.




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