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Coursera launches Career Services
17 points by donretag 899 days ago | 5 comments
Career Services: Finding great job opportunities

Coursera has begun Career Services with the goal of helping Coursera students find great jobs! Meeting great companies just got easier. Just go to coursera.org/account/careerservices and fill in your profile to opt-in to the service. After you opt-in, we will share your resume and other information you provide with selected partner companies who will introduce themselves if there’s a match.

We're excited to connect you with great companies and new opportunities! Complete your profile here! coursera.org/account/careerservices

Andrew, Daphne, and the Coursera team




The add more privacy info at https://www.coursera.org/account/placement/faq

Including it here since it is behind the subwall:

---------------------------------- What data will be shared? The data we share may include: * Name * Score and percentile ranking * Percentage of assignments completed * Forum points (a numerical value summarizing forum participation) * Information provided in your Coursera profile and your Career Services settings.

You will always have control over whether or not we continue to share your information with employers and you can use the opt-in field on the Career Services settings page to opt-in or out at any time.

Note: We will not share your age, gender, or email address (unless you separately provide this in your resumé, personal website, etc).

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I wish they would share who they will allow to access their database and what the retention policy is. Will they allow third-party recruiters? Can someone scrape their database?

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Do they even share that information with the students themselves?

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Is this part of Coursera's monetization strategy - i.e. finder's fees for successful placement? I think this form of monetizing would be much less disruptive to the goal of providing quality free education than alternatives (ads, sponsored courses, etc). Anyone have some insight to this?

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That has always been the assumption. When the first few Coursera courses finished, a few top students were offered chances to interview at certain companies.

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It sure feels shady to me. It's a blatant case of "you are the product" if you see where all the players stand.

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