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Unclear. MIT's introductory CS course used to be taught in Scheme, which in many ways was a grand leveler because people who knew how to program imperative languages had to un-learn many things first. It was still considered quite a hard class.

In the new world order, we have 6.00, which is a "learn how to program" class which is not required for computer science majors (and which many non-6 majors take), and 6.01/6.02, which is the introductory sequence that everyone is required to take. The programming segments of these classes are still relatively trivial for someone with a reasonable amount of programming experience. (But I’ll also note the cover a very broad range of topics, and you’re bound to not know some of the other topics, e.g. EE)




The University of Minnesota's introductory computer science course for majors is still a Scheme course based on the SICP book.

http://www.cs.umn.edu/academics/undergraduate/class_desc/csc...


Yeah the MIT approach seems oriented towards fundamentals that will be useful in both EE and Computer Science.

To me, the beginning of 6.01 looks like a thorough review of most of the standard programming concepts using Python. I get the sense of "hey here's this tool, we're going to learn to use it. Try and keep up." Once Python and programming are covered, a whole bunch of programming-related engineering concepts are introduced. 6.02 looks to be primarily about networks and signaling and programming seems to be secondary.




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