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I'm pretty disappointed by this title.

I know that it might be said in fun - and is an easy way to get clicks, but it feeds into the narrative of new, shiny tech. As the article points out at the end, there are very real engineering tradeoffs with GraphQL - and the answer isn't as easy as REST is dead, anachronistic technology that no engineer should consider (the XML analogy felt particularly inflammatory).

Kelly and I were chatting about GraphQL, and his post might be a more thoughtful engineering post: http://kellysutton.com/2017/01/02/do-we-need-graphql.html (the title - Do we need GraphQL? - is at least the way I'd expect engineers to approach the problem, where he discusses the tradeoffs)

In my MongoDB series, I point out a past case where Free Code Camp fed the hype, by telling engineers that the reason everyone had to learn the MEAN stack was due to employability in the software industry: https://medium.freecodecamp.org/the-real-reason-to-learn-the...

(you had to dig into the article to realize that their argument was more nuanced, and that they taught SQL first before MongoDB)

A number of "engineering" posts are not written as a thoughtful engineer might, and are in many ways marketing for the products sold (like a training program or code camp).




>A number of "engineering" posts are not written as a thoughtful engineer might, and are in many ways marketing for the products sold (like a training program).

I think this is a great insight that is often overlooked in tech marketing. When any vendor comes up with a product that claims "[industry standard] is dead, use [our product]", there should be alarm bells ringing already.


>When any vendor comes up with a product that claims "[industry standard] is dead, use [our product]", there should be alarm bells ringing already.

Seen this from quite a ways back. When .NET came out, I remember college students in my neighborhood (e.g. when hanging out at some tea shop or restaurant), asking me (they knew me, and that I was in software), in a concerned tone, stuff like:

"We hear that now that .NET has come, Java will be dead. Is that right?"

I used to have to disabuse them of such nonsensical notions. Not that Java will live forever, but obviously a mature and widely adopted technology is not going to die off overnight. Such is the hype, though, for the new and shiny.


The author of this piece is selling a Pluralsight course on building GraphQL applications, so qui bono certainly applies.


Yeah, it's really unfortunate that people feel the need to trash other technologies when promoting something.

I'm a big fan of GraphQL and tried to write up a more low-level comparison here: https://dev-blog.apollodata.com/graphql-vs-rest-5d425123e34b




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