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Google Plus (Picasa) supports unlimited photos under 2048x2048. This is much better than printing (4x6) in terms of quality as well.

The question is what will happen to Picasa? Will it be free in 5, 10, 50 years? Will it be free?

https://support.google.com/picasa/answer/6558?hl=en

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Making profit does support creative artists as some of that money goes to them. As a business they want to maximize profits. Why shouldn't they go after sites that cause them to lose profit?

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Why shouldn't they go after sites that cause them to lose profit?

You'll need to provide evidence that downloading actually leads to lower profits before anyone can tackle that question.

The hypothesis that "People who download content buy less because they're getting TV shows for free. If they couldn't download they'd buy instead." might sound fine, there are some problems with it.

* People might be spending 100% of their entertainment budget on TV shows already, so they couldn't buy any more if they stopped downloading. Stopping those downloads would lead to zero additional profit.

* People might be downloading everything regardless of what it is, including a hell of a lot of things they'd never buy (hoarding mentality). Stopping those downloads would lead to zero additional profit.

* People who download might be fanatical about the TV show, downloading shows to watch as early as possible. Stopping those downloads would lead have a negative impact on profit because those are the people who do the grass-roots evangelism that drives hype.

* People download because they believe the content has zero value. Without downloads they'd just watch something else. Stopping those downloads would lead to zero additional profit.

The question of whether downloading actually harms industry or not had not been answered.

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> The question of whether downloading actually harms industry or not had not been answered.

This is kind of ridiculous. I think we all know that it hurts the industry. Only in your third scenario does downloading actually help the content producers. And you're leaving off two groups that hurt your case:

* people who would watch the show on TV but instead download

* people who would buy DVDs but instead download

Based on people I know who torrent, the second group is actually fairly large.

Your argument is like "people who go into a store and steal a DVD shouldn't get in trouble because they probably wouldn't have bought that DVD anyway." Which is clearly a ridiculous argument.

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The "copyright infringement is theft" argument has been thoroughly debunked. It's not even remotely similar. Theft is depriving someone of property. No one is deprived of anything when you copy something, and downloads aren't property.

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It's absolutely similar. It's getting something without paying for it. The "deprived of property" thing is kind of a red herring anyway, since the cost to make an additional DVD is close to nothing, and stores routinely dispose of unsold merchandise, often ordering more than they think they'll sell so there's no risk of selling out.

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> Your argument is like "people who go into a store and steal a DVD shouldn't get in trouble because they probably wouldn't have bought that DVD anyway."

It's not quite the same as saying that. It's more like, "people who go into a store and steal a DVD shouldn't get in trouble because they probably wouldn't have bought that DVD anyway and the way they're stealing it means the store has exactly the same number of DVDs as it did before the theft."

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The cost of producing the DVD is close to nothing. It's not like stealing a physically hard-to-produce object. You're paying for the IP.

DVDs don't operate in a scarcity model. Stealing a DVD really is almost equivalent to pirating a movie. The fact that the store is deprived of a physical item is pretty much irrelevant to the argument; they probably would have disposed of many unsold copies of the DVD anyway.

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Let's say it doesn't have any affect on their profits... hell, lets say piracy makes everyone MORE money. Does it matter? Shouldn't content creators still have a right to say who gets their content for free?

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Shouldn't content creators still have a right to say who gets their content for free?

Of course. But if they want to have that say then they should do whatever they can to protect their work. If they fail to protect their content and let someone upload it then that's their fault. It's not my place as a consumer to help them to protect their work by not downloading it. Morally speaking I have no duty to help the content creator.

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* People are willing to pay for content, but there's no easy/practical way for them to do so. Without downloads, they just wouldn't watch the thing at all.

I suspect this is the most frequent camp, and it's the one I'm in. If you want to take my money, downloads are irrelevant, just allow Netflix to have better stuff.

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Avatar was the most profitable movie in history, as well as the most pirated one.

Profits seem to be much more strongly connected with quality/popularity rather than the rate of piracy.

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They ask for piracy with they way they treat their paying customers. If I buy an audiobook I don't want to have to register a device to play it on. I don't want to have to look up account details and go online to register a new device before I can copy my stuff across. These industries have tried to cripple the hardware that I purchase so it would refuse to copy one of their disks. I want to be able to make back ups. I want to be able to lend my property. I want to be able to sell my property. In the unlikely event that they manage to get rid of filesharing I can only imagine how hard they'll squeeze us for ever increasing amounts of loot.

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The wonderful thing about being a consumer is that you have the right to purchase or refuse to purchase anything you want. If an audio book disallows you from reselling, don't buy the audio book. I disagree with invasive DRM but in no way does it justify piracy.

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Preventing you from selling your property in this way is illegal in the eu I believe. Does the risk of piracy justify drm if it infringes on my rights?

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Because the people you are clamping down on are also your customers!

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I don't see that comment as saying they shouldn't go after these sites. I see it as saying that going after them is essentially futile as long as they ignore the demand that these sites satisfy. It's not shocking that an illegal service is the cheapest option, but it's absurd that it's the most convenient option in many cases.

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Tell that to the Beatles.

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Can you clarify the key differences? What happens if you hook up a monitor, just DOS command line or does it have a desktop UI? Can you remote desktop?

That's seriously underwhelming...

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This is not the desktop version of Windows 10 but "Windows 10 IoT". It has no GUI whatsoever. People are planning to buy this, thinking they will be able to run some sort of desktop Windows. They're in for a huge disappointed.

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How? It benefits me as a consumer, I'm excited to put Windows 10 on a Pi. It benefits the RPi foundation (assuming their sales go up).

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And there's nothing wrong with that. Kids will be more productive on Windows and more likely be able to take those skills with them. How many kids need to know linux in the future? Here's what the Linux trend looks like: http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=linux

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'linux' is a single keyword, while GNU/Linux OS might show up as a wide set of different keywords, like ubuntu, debian, mint, arch, centos, rhel, fedora, gentoo, opensuse. Note that this is not the case with Windows, iOS, OSX. So, it would be interesting to see the combined interest of all those added to that of 'linux' for a more correct perspective - not considering Android of course, since it's not a GNU/Linux system.

BTW it seems interest in Windows is also halving every ~10 years (though not as fast as 'linux'):

http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=windows

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Edit: I was partly wrong; the matter is much more complex than that: interest in iOS and OSX might show up as interest in iPhone/iPad, and Mac/Mac OS; interest in Windows, besides any interest in 'surface', might also show up as a generic interest in 'PC' or similar terms: you can make such assumption, since anyway those interested in 'linux' or 'OSX' would probably avoid using terms generally associated with Windows.

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>Kids will be more productive on Windows

Citation needed.

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Didn't we just establish that it's the system that kids already know more about?

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Not kids. Teachers.

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Sorry, and it pains me to say it as I'm the patriarch of an OS X family, but: Kids. Their first exposure to computers will be at home. And it'll therefore likely be Windows. My kids don't know Windows, they know OS X and iOS. Sometimes, after they've visited friends, they comment that they played on a computer that "looked weird", but they've never had a problem adapting.

It's that last bit that seems to suggest a "who cares what the OS is, kids don't care" idea. In my view, though, it really doesn't. Kids aren't known to have a higher order of executive function. They'll generally just use whatever the trusted adults in their lives use.

Those trusted adults should be exposing kids to all the options, so that the kids are better prepared to make decisions when their executive function skills catch up.

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Was this weird computer they used a Windows machine or was it an old OSX version? :-)

Only kidding. I went to PC World the other day and attempted to use one of the Windows PCs and quickly became angry with Windows 8.1. Seems I have been using Macs for too long (and I used to use Windows daily, now I do but in a VM and it pains me).

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Is it not more productive for teachers to teach something they know? If a kid has a question about Linux and the teacher doesn't know Linux, they won't be able to answer the question. Likewise if a kid has a question about Windows and the teacher doesn't know Windows, they can't answer it.

It doesn't matter what system it is, teachers are best at teaching what they already know.

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If a teacher only knows DOS, he/she should teach DOS? ;)

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I didn't say "should only teach". If your (obvious facetious, I know that) argument actually followed mine, it would say "A teacher only knows DOS, they would be most effective at teaching DOS". Which is true.

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The point, though, of the parent commenter was that just because a teacher can teach something "effectively" doesn't mean that something should be taught in the first place.

There are plenty of teachers throughout the United States who are effective at teaching creationism to their students. I think we can all agree that doing so is not healthy for those students.

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OK, but doesn't it follow that the kids would be more productive if the teachers know the OS and are able to help out?

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> How many kids need to know linux in the future?

All of them, if they want any hope of having a programming or system administration job (i.e. the non-executive IT jobs that pay pretty darn well) in the foreseeable future. Linux is what powers the vast majority of web servers nowadays, regardless of whether they're being run by plucky startups or long-tenured industry incumbents. Windows in the server world has effectively been relegated to legacy systems and a smattering of government websites (some of which in and of themselves also count as "legacy systems"), and that market is continuously shrinking as businesses modernize in methodology and technology.

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I completely disagree. I used Ubuntu for a year and I spent more time fixing things or trying to do things in the OS than I have in all other operating systems combined. My nephew tried to install Ubuntu on his new build and hit brick wall after brick wall trying to install the OS and Minecraft. It simply hasn't gotten easy enough and I'm afraid it's too late now.

I don't see a comeback for linux. http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=linux

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Well, using your logic, Linux has already surpassed OS X:

http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=linux%2C OS X&cmpt=q&tz=

Anyway, Ubuntu works fine on most laptops. We can safely say it works across more hardware than OS X. We can also buy an Ubuntu certified laptop/desktop and have excellent support.

I wish Windows fan boys would stop pretending as if they never run into issues using Windows. I have to fix my dads computer once a week with windows. Windows 8.1 refused to wake from sleep on a brand new laptop that it came installed on and the wifi kept cutting in and out.

I find my self having a more pleasant experience more and more on Linux and less and less on Windows.

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Oh god. I run 8.1 at home, and it randomly fails to "sleep" -- about half the time (or more), it will boot from scratch the next time I turn it on. I don't know if it's a problem with my hardware, or drivers, or what. Worst of all, the only sleep/hibernate related things I'vebeen able to find on the Windows help pages seem to be for people where it either always fails, or where they don't know how to turn it on. :-(

The most frustrating thing is the mystery about what causes it, since I haven't been able to find errors that explain it in the system logs.

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It's unfortunate that you apparently had bad experiences with Ubuntu, but this thread is about development tools, not installing third party games from external sources. Yes, if you want to game, windows seems like a more convenient choice, nobody disputes that.

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>Yes, if you want to game, windows seems like a more convenient choice, nobody disputes that.

Gaben is closing that gap for us.

Also, Minecraft runs fine on Linux. If GP poster had trouble, it's probably down to a video driver issue (which aren't unique to Linux, but are arguably more painful), or a new-environment-learning-curve thing.

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I don't think Valve will doing for longer time if the studios don't care.

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I think that Valve has bet the farm on Linux. Gaben seems to think that Microsoft might build their own game marketplace and use it to push Valve out.

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Sure they will. You wouldn't believe how many new games Steam is trying to throw at me on Linux.

The big studios might not care too much (though even this isn't really universal, since there are plenty of big studios that do target Linux/SteamOS), but there's a lot of activity from indie developers, many of whom are targeting SteamOS before they even target OS X (though there still aren't any SteamOS exclusives that I know of).

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This isn't just related to 3. party games.

I've seen and helped people that hit these brick walls everywhere, whether it's installing the OS itself, a compiler, accessing a thumb drive, or whatever other task they want to accomplish.

These are things that may be incredibly trivial for us that's comfortable in this environment, but a brick wall for others.

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Linux OS installation used to be objectively difficult even for a reasonable computer user. That hasn't been true for more than a decade. IMO, the relative difficulty of getting the Windows vs Linux installed and nominally working inverted some years ago. Take a group of college freshmen who've never even seen Linux before and have them install both OS. Measure which of those tasks is completed first/correctly, and which takes more supervision.

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Well I have a B+ and installed Raspbian for a little home energy project that reads from my smart meter over serial and pushes the data to the cloud. The programming was easy, I spent 5x as much time trying to get things installed. Finally got Cloud9 working, never was able to get InfluxDB installed, kind of got OrientDB installed (it crashes).

I consider myself a technical person and while I think it's fun to use Linux, it's certainly not productive.

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> I consider myself a technical person and while I think it's fun to use Linux, it's certainly not productive.

Should read: "...I'm certainly not productive."

Just because you struggled with the Linux paradigm, it doesn't mean that it's an unproductive platform.

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My 79 year old mom uses Ubuntu and she loves it because it never breaks. I moved her to Linux because I was tired of fixing her Windows install (on the same machine).

You and your nephew must be doing something very wrong.

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I've moved my immediate family over to Suse and Ubuntu, but I've had about half of all my conversions "in the field" backfire - something little breaks, and then the echochamber of Windows mindshare around them make them demand I put them back on Windows because they "can't get this different thing".

Then I get a dozen calls in the next six months about how completely broken something in 7 or 8 is, but they never consider switching back.

I don't know how to fix that. They get it in their heads that Windows is right and everything else is wrong and the first sign of contention drives them to panic right back to the MS camp, where every day is contention with the viruses and spyware.

Just an example, I had setup a small store with Ubuntu terminals. Six months later they wanted me to switch it all to Windows 8. For those six months the only service calls I got were software updates and general inqueries like "how do I download X?" or "how do I get flash?". Linking a one click Ubuntu install for Flash is insanely easy.

But now its been over six months again since the Windows 8 switch back, and I'm in about once a month to remove systemic viruses and spyware from all the computers because they all get horribly infected and I make them change their passwords every time. They even had the store owners credit card info stolen once, but they would never fathom using anything else again.

And they switched back because Office 2013 in Wine (because they could not stand LibreOffice) didn't interopt between each part properly - IE, trying to open an Access database as a form fill in Word never worked, and they didn't want me to just give them network disabled XP VMs to run Office in using all their old license keys because when they tried that the employees kept trying to use IE6 in the VM and complained it had no Internet connectivity.

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I sincerely hope you, at least, are paid by the hour and by incident.

It's depressing to read stories like these. I to do not know how to neutralize the peer pressure that seems to make people want to be constantly abused by their malware-infested Windows machines just because their friends are...

One thing may help: interesting metaphors.

When my mom once asked about viruses, I made her picture her computer as an SR-71 cruising at Mach 3.6, high above anti-aircraft fire directed towards Windows machines. Sticky images like this may help, but they may need occasional reinforcement.

Every once and then she also forwards me a chain letter warning about the dangers of such-and-such e-mail scam that tricks people into download malware. I tell her to relax because the malware most likely will not be able run on her computer, much less compromise it.

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I'm not sure that Google Trends is a valid metric for this conclusion. It shows both Windows and MacOS X have declining trends as well. Apparently iOS is doing gangbusters in Cambodia and Android is all the rage in Indonesia.

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I would say that spending that time fixing things and trying to do things in the OS really helps you to learn about how some of the parts of the OS actually work. If the point is to learn things, then maybe it's better if everything doesn't "just work".

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Meh. Seems okay to me. I'm not convinced the chart really tells us anything at all. http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=linux%2C Microsoft

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I do:

http://www.google.com/trends/explore#q=android

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Completely agree on backwards compatibility but AtScript isn't required for Angular 2.0.

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hundreds? I'd be surprised if we hadn't reached a thousand.

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The demo video below specifically shows translucent as well as opaque. Watch when the woman is interacting with the rela motorcycle, she extends the height:

http://www.microsoft.com/microsoft-hololens/en-us

I'm skeptical we'll have anything this remotely usable or practical in our hands in the next 2 years.

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To get fully immersed in another world. For example, playing games or watching a movie. I go to an IMAX theatre because it engulfs my senses, audio all around me, most of my field of view watching the screen. If the screen were translucent it simply wouldn't be the same.

This will no doubt have some incredible applications, most of which augment reality. Not quite the same goal as Occulus.

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but couldn't Microsoft just release (or ship this product with) a sort of blinder to put around these glasses to make the dedicated sight come from the glasses themselves while darkening everything else?

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Certainly possible. It'll be interesting to see how feasible it is for these goggles to render entire 3d worlds in this scenario, since normally they'd be rendering a small fraction of the space you're in.

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If the speculation about creating opaque holograms is correct, you can just use a virtual blinder as well - a black hologram that obscures or creates a virtual stage.

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That is an awesome hack that basically allows really low cost immediate context switching.

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Or just turn out the lights.

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Exactly. MSFT and Oculus are not at all targeting the same thing. The comparison is natural, but ill-fitting.

I bought an oculus and am excited by VR because teleportation IS FREAKING AWESOME. AR is cool, but a far cry from the sense of presence that we talk all day about in VR land.

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I don't think Oculus wants to the the IMAX of virtual experiences.

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