Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | underdown's comments login

I think blaming the 1972 law is misguided. In 2011 the Department of Education made policy changes that limited due process.

Source: http://www.nacua.org/documents/OCRLetterviolence.pdf

-----


It's strange how the federal government, bound by the constitution to due process, can mandate it be removed at universities.

-----


I don't mean to be a peer validating you, but this comment really hit the mark for me.

-----


As a cyclist from Arizona I stopped reading after seeing that. Complete BS. Lying via omission to support your claim is not a great way to inspire trust.

-----


Or perhaps Ireland's spending was artifically high? Your bias for government intervention is showing.

-----


I've been accused of many thing in my time, but never of favouring government intervention...

However you slice it, Ireland was enjoying a quality of life that could not be sustained, paying for it with EU subsidies, which enabled them to charge less tax than running their state really cost, which they used to lure jobs from the UK. Then when the money ran out, those jobs went to Poland or other lower-cost locations, and they went cap in hand begging to England for more money.

-----


> they went cap in hand begging to England for more money.

You have no evidence of this, the link you posted earlier was a bailout of RBS. You'll have to do better than that.

EDIT incidentally, if the jobs were lured from Britain why did they ultimately go to Poland?

-----


I think it's fair to say that in recent times "Ireland was enjoying a quality of life that could not be sustained" but the explanation you offered is incorrect. In reality it was based on a property bubble and cheap investment capital due to artificially low interest rates engineered by the chief eurocrats. Go back a little further and the explanation for increasing employment in the 90s is based on having a young, well educated and underemployed population just as globalization was really kicking off.

Ireland joined the EU in 1973. If "subsidies" and "job luring" are the explanation, I'd have expected to see more progress way back then.

I'm not sure where you're going with your arguments that it was all based on "EU subsidies" and "luring jobs", but since others may read this I wanted to correct the record.

edit: it is true that the UK lent money to the Republic of Ireland in order to bail out UK banks with massive exposure to the property bubble - a bubble created in large part by the reckless practices of those very same banks. That loan has to be paid back by Irish tax payers.

-----


Google also caches itself: http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:T1NRLL-...

-----


It's for good measure, in case it's down.

-----


I'd love to have fiber dropped to my home but this article glosses over the privacy implications of having a government entity have direct access to everything you do online.

-----


RTFA. Direct quote from the linked page:

"There Are Good Reasons Not to Want the Government to be Your ISP

"Just because a local municipality might own the fiber infrastructure does not necessarily mean it is also best-suited to act as an ISP to residents. Residents might rightly wonder what sort of information sharing practices would become policy, particularly information sharing with law enforcement.

"This challenge can be addressed as well. Cities can help resolve privacy concerns by adopting the open access model described above. On this model the local municipality merely leases the fiber and never has to have access to the data on the fiber. Local ISPs that lease the fiber can be held accountable by users that encourage the ISPs to adopt privacy-protecting policies and terms of service."

-----


Indeed. Taxpayer-funded broadband has its allure, but the risks of something going very wrong with private data are much higher, in terms of what is at stake if not in terms of odds of a breach.

-----


The solution here is SSL everywhere, at all times. We should be just as concerned about Time Warner and Comcast having access to our private browsing.

It'd be nice to have an intermediate step between HTTP and CA-validated HTTPS. Yes, my ISP could theoretically MITM me, but it'd at least allow websites to prevent casual snooping.

-----


The exact match domain nerf was like two years ago.

-----


Does it include premium account users' data?

-----


The yandex (chrome) browser has been doing this for some time now. I switched back to chrome because of this feature. /sadface

-----


...Unless you are targeting your custom audience (past buyers/users) etc.

-----


But isn't it that no matter who you target and where, the click farms always steal the clicks?

-----


Only if they have accounts inside those verticals. The more specific you are the less likely this is to be the case.

-----


But aren't the click farms in every verticla, in every location?

-----


No, there isn't any need for that. There will of course be some spread but it isn't intentional or planned. They don't need a solid distribution of verticals and locations for what they offer to clients since they don't need to see their clients ads just click like on their pages.

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: