Hacker Newsnew | comments | ask | jobs | submit | sigkill's commentslogin

Aren't H1B work visa? But I think your idea of the green card is pretty good to return the balance of employer/employee leverage. I wonder what abuses that might have though.

reply

eshvk 6 days ago | link

I think what the parent implies by "work visa" is a visa that is not tied to the employer. The H1B as it stands now is just a proxy for indentured labor.

reply

goshx 6 days ago | link

right, that requirement to be tied to the employer is also what prevents the H1B to run its own company (although H1B can start a business, (s)he is not allowed to run it.)

reply

kosievdmerwe 6 days ago | link

> indentured labour.

Could you explain, I'm not sure how this is the case?

reply

eshvk 6 days ago | link

Sure. The way the H1B works is that it is tied to your employer. The employer knows this. You know it. This creates leverage on the part of the employer. How? Two ways: One, you get fired, you are out of status immediately, you have to leave the country ASAP or find a job immediately. So, you make sure you don't get fired. Two, an H1B employee is supposed to be paid the prevailing job market rate. For CA, San Francisco County, the max is around 100K. It is a pretty sum. BUT. It is also less than market rate as of six months ago (when I was job hunting). Now, most big companies don't need to exploit you. But a wily manager can easily fuck with you with enough awareness of the issue.

Personally, I have noticed this phenomenon at smaller companies where a H1B candidate is potentially more attractive. I got a green card very recently, however, I am obviously not an American and am relatively young enough that I can be suspected of not having a Green Card. I have had a few situations where hiring managers were rather disappointed that I didn't need their help to acquire an H1B or for them to file for my green card.

reply


Resistance of a cable/wire is given by the formula R = <rho> * L / A where rho is the resistivity of the material, L = length, and A is the cross-sectional area.

It's a pretty straight forward formula. To lower the resistance, you either decrease the numerator (but a zero length wire is pretty useless) or increase the denominator (a huge-ass not even necessarily infinite, but just a conductor the cross-sectional area of say, the Pentagon, is technically possible but utterly pointless unless you're transmitting electricity cross-continent or whatever.

However, the resistivity of a conductor is its inherent property and so if there were a way to get a material whose resistivity was zero. Then you could transmit huge-ass amounts of energy over hair-strand thin wires because since <rho> is zero, you can play with other parameters in that formula without any fear. Hmm... (hint hint)

reply


So this is one thing that puzzles me. Why can't phones have modular drivers like a PC? Phones of today are way more powerful than PC of the past, but it seems that manufacturers still want to keep an appliance like structure for the phone.

In my ideal world, I'd download (say) Android 4.4 and install it on my phone. After that, I'd hunt around, download and install the drivers for my phone like mic, camera, gyro, etc.

Why is this not possible already?

-----

ctz 15 days ago | link

Historically a huge amount of effort went into making PC hardware enumerable at runtime and hotpluggable: BIOS, then ISA PnP, then PCI/PCIe, and ACPI. eg. There are BIOS functions dedicated to telling you, in no uncertain terms, what RAM you have and the addresses it appears at.

ARM's architecture is still quite firmly stuck with the embedded approach where you get your memory map and peripheral availability at compile time, probably by reading addresses from a manual published by your SoC manufacturer. Usually at early boot there is nothing which will tell you where your RAM is, what peripherals you have and where they are, etc. You either just have to know, or have some non-standard configuration mechanism which tells you.

Things are improving, but slowly. ACPI exists for ARM and is being actively worked on, but isn't widely deployed yet.

-----

userbinator 14 days ago | link

Don't forget that there was also a huge amount of effort invested in making the PC backwards-compatible for software; although this has (unfortunately, IMHO) become somewhat decreased these days, you can still mostly count on a PC having the same "legacy" devices (8042, 8259, 8254, 8237, MC146818) that behave the same as they did in the AT, despite them being integrated into the chipset now. Those weren't enumerable since this was before PnP, but them being there was a pseudo-standard that software could depend on.

In contrast, ARM SoCs are extremely diverse, and the only thing they all have in common is an ARM CPU core. There is no one standard for where the peripherals are, how they behave, how the SoC boots, etc. There is no "standard platform" for ARM like there is the PC for x86. The closest "de-facto" platform I can see for smartphones is the Mediatek MT65xx, which is used by the majority of the generic Chinese ones (and some branded ones, like Lenovo).

-----

tcas 15 days ago | link

Additionally, device tree support in the Linux kernel allows many board specific ports to be packaged onto a single kernel, and the bootloader specify which peripherals and their addresses and features are there. Still nowhere near as powerful as ACPI though.

-----

stusmall 15 days ago | link

It is possible but there is no financial incentive to do so. There is no user expectation to install your own OS on a phone like there is a PC. Its just cheaper and easier to develop and test a product if you can assume the hardware/software are in lockstep and you completely control both.

Also you have to keep in mind, the driver situation in the embedded world can get dark fast. Manufacturers wanting to keep datasheets secret, drivers that are just pass-throughs so user space daemons can write to hardware so they don't have to comply with the GPL. It gets weird fast, and why bother with that mess if it won't win any more customers than just a few hardcore hackers and power users.

-----

andrewflnr 15 days ago | link

Sounds like a crummy world to me if you have to hunt around for drivers. I'd rather everything just worked out of the box, with the option to change drivers around later if I want. Getting drivers working is one of the worst parts of an OS install.

-----

sliverstorm 15 days ago | link

You are in a much better position to wrangle with a half-working PC than your phone. No hardware keyboard or mouse, for starters.

-----

ghughes 15 days ago | link

Because it makes for a terrible user experience.

-----


Magnet - magnet:?xt=urn:btih:b451022826f63c15fefc24bc91d0284adbee5c21&dn=THE+PIRATE+BAY+BUNDLE&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.istole.it%3A6969&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.ccc.de%3A80&tr=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337

-----


I don't know why I haven't seen this linked before here, but this is a very informative teardown of an FDR by Mike of MikesElectricStuff

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQehX0rVYuY

Check out his other videos as well. He is really good at what he does, and his videos still retain the hackery feel.

-----


To be fair, technology makes it easy to firehose-vacuum data for both the government and civilians if you know how to wield that power. The government needs to supply a letter stating that they're 'quartering troops' in your datacenters in an abstract manner (bureaucratic exploit) while the normal user learns the intricacies of the system and uses that (technological exploit). It so happens that fixing bureaucratic 0days are harder than fixing tech. 0days.

-----


Seems exactly like modern day witchcraft/wizardry hunt.

If a Middle Age dude was an expert in chemistry, he'd probably be tried quite similarly. The fact that no one around him could even comprehend what chemistry is, is now completely irrelevant to them ruining his life.

Now replace that with technology, the people with modern day morons and death with impossibly high bail/languishing in prison for years together ruining any chance of an average, let alone decent future and you've got what we have today.

The point is, they don't know the subject yet feel that they know enough. History, it seems never changes.

-----


The beauty of your comment is that just a little over half a year ago you'd be considered a complete conspiracy nut and a paranoid tinfoil hatter but today there's no one even saying anything against you.

-----


>Not very intelligent for an intelligence agency

I am also wondering, is it smart for an intelligence agency to tell the truth when they say "We don't know how much was leaked"? Or is this a large lie in order to lower, I don't know, someone's guard. I mean, it doesn't make sense to me.

-----


In a perverse despotic dictatorial way, killing US citizens is okay because "they're my slaves" kind of thing. He's dealing with a government that has killed a group of Yemeni family folks in Yemen who were allegedly attending a wedding accidentally with a drone strike. It is my imagination where they just say "Oops".

-----

More

Lists | RSS | Bookmarklet | Guidelines | FAQ | DMCA | News News | Feature Requests | Bugs | Y Combinator | Apply | Library

Search: