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IR output is too cool. It's really nice of LLVM to let you use arbitrary strings in identifiers, like

  %"2.core::fmt::rt::v1::Position"

  %"2.core::option::Option<&'static [core::fmt::rt::v1::Argument]>"
makes it easy to understand.

Is it cool if I print myself a hard copy with one of those self-serve book printers?

Sure, that's what I made this version for! <del>You might want to wait a bit, though. I'm just about to publish a new revision.</del> Update is here.

(The book is, just like the Rust compiler, licensed as MIT/Apache2 if you were wondering.)


Oh my god. I remember that "sizzle." That's the perfect way to put it!

... It is not missed.

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It takes a long time and many round trips to establish an SSH connection. You can keep a shared connection open as a workaround. But mobile devices (laptops included) don't persist connections, because batteries.

Maybe you could do it on top of mosh? https://mosh.mit.edu/

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Yeah. It's like 24fps in film. In 60fps (HD) every flaw is apparent; film props of the wrong weight look fake, and insincere facial microexpressions give it away.

Whereas in 24fps (pixelation), creators can get away with more as your brain fills in the gaps. There's also the bonus that it feels dream-like; larger than life.

There's also the question of pixel-perfect platforming. HD platformers can feel sloppy and untrustworthy if not done right. It's easier to trust a pixelated platformer. (And yet I've never felt cheated by a jump in the polygonal New Super Mario Bros.)

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Many pixel games today take it further by adding shaders, lighting, semi-transparency, HDR, particle effects, etc. so a lot of them share this hybrid old-new look. It's charming if a) done tastefully and b) the animation/art is solid e.g. Towerfall Ascension.

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There are a few games that really nail the pixel art, but they are the exception among the flood of poorly done graphics. Those titles usually look different than most other pixel art games and don't fall into the lookalike pattern I mentioned before. I tend to generalize negatively in regards of pixel art because of the vast majority of the bad titles.

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Yes! Thank you. I love the old pixel aesthetic, but today's art should fit today's constraints. Those classic games will always be around, awaiting your next nostalgia rush. Screw stagnation.

Likewise, I like old Victorians and Art Deco, but I wouldn't be excited about one built today. No one would respect a 2015 medieval-style castle quite like one from 1515.

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Agreed. It's like the tacky buildings in Las Vegas that mimic other buildings, or Disney World, or those faux-European cities built for tourists in China.

I sure would love to see some new cathedrals built using the methods of centuries past, though.

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However, a medieval-style castle would still be cool if it was built in 2015.

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Pretty sure the pyramids were the original massively pixelated structure.

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Nice find with the grammar mismatch! Thanks for showing your methods in depth. I also liked the intro bit about knowing how to delve into a system. Seems like hoisting the entire Rust compiler distribution into one brain would be uncomfortable; there's so much going on in there.

Tangentially, digital archaeology is fascinating. I want to see some kind of VR "Git Simulator 201X" for exploring history in 3D. Maybe render commits projected spatially by date and be able to zoom into the diffs? If it could pull down all the PR comments from GitHub and then annotate the graph/blames... well, it might be useful, or might be more distracting than productive. Maybe a project for some rainy winter...

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Thanks! There's more grammar and reference work to be done, hint hint to anyone reading this and looking for something to do on Rust ;)

I'd love to be able to follow a chunk of code around visually, wherever it gets moved, play back the commits touching it... not sure how it'd work exactly, but I think you're onto something there :)

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Agreed; editor "slop" is important for UX. A structure editor needs to model a text editor, with all its indeterminacy, to be usable.

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Same here. Well, s/working on/pondering and failing at/ for me :P

My most recent attempt: https://github.com/pshc/archipelago

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