Hacker News new | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | peterb's comments login

you mean us-nord-1 :-)

-----


ÉU-nord-1 (the US is États-Unis)! But I hope it would be ca-.

-----


Yeah, that's what I would do. First apply an IIR low pass filter (e.g. 200 Hz), downsample, apply a window function (e.g. Hamming, but there are probably better choices) and then autocorrelate the window. The peaks in the autocorrelation should give you the beat. If you use a higher frequency you can get the sub-beats. This should work with all music types ... kick drum or no kick drum.

-----


I would love it if they could optimize it for specific use cases, such as removing the advertising on the ice & boards from a televised hockey game.

-----


My advice is to apply his engineering skills to the job hunt itself. Send out CV's every day, network, hunt, analyze data, look for patterns, etc. As he is discovering, job hunting is a full time job.

In Canada, there are organizations for older job hunters that help with resume preparation and cover letters, job hunting techniques, how to network effectively, etc. Working with others in a similar situation is great for your morale. I wish him good luck.

-----


They only axed Silicon Valley research. Microsoft Research is still strong, but in Redmond, Israel and other locations. The Microsoft executive team fully recognizes that research is key to their future success.

-----


What success has come from MSR? MSR always seemed like a charity operation.

-----


Why? This is not a troll, I'm very interested in your reasons.

-----


As someone who has been working with GWT, and since moved to JS, I can elaborate on why I agree. GWT was an excellent tool when I started using it, but has been eclipsed (no pun intended) by substantially nicer frameworks (IMO). I am extremely thankful to be using it as little as possible, and am migrating as many of our GWT apps over into Javascript apps as soon as workload allows. (I'd LOVE to hear from someone who is currently using GWT, and has compelling reasons that it's a great tool that are not driven by the inertia of a large codebase.)

The main reason I'm glad not to use GWT is that I enjoy developing in Javascript a lot more than I do in GWT (Java). I have found that I can implement, modify, or troubleshoot a UI roughly an order of magnitude faster than I used to be able to do it with GWT. This is due to a combination of being able to reload by refreshing my browser (no slow re-compilation steps), as well as being able to inspect elements/styles directly in the Chrome dev tools.

There are about an order of magnitude (or more!) people who write about Javascript, or $FrameworkOfChoice (Angular, Backbone, etc) than there are that write about GWT. This includes both blogs and Stack Overflow, not to mention examples on JSFiddle or the like.

GWT doesn't easily let me integrate other Javascript libraries or components, so you have to implement your crappy version of Chosen (or similar) yourself. There's no JQuery or Underscore or similar, because it's all Java (basically).

The Chrome Dev Tools or Firebug are >>> the GWT debugger. The GWT Dev Mode plugins required for debugging, is also no longer supported in Chrome, and soon in Firefox. (I discovered this last week, the first time I've touched GWT in half a year. There's a newer Dev Tools alternative, but I've been unable to actually get it working.)

Javascript testing tools (Jasmine, phantomJS, etc) and build tools are now a MUCH more mature ecosystem than they were when GWT was first invented. We used to use a combo of JUnit + Watir/Selenium to test our UI, and now we can do similar with Javascript frameworks in a less fragile way.

In summary, GWT was awesome, but I see no reason to use it today. It helped me find my current job, so I'm grateful for that. However, if you were looking for a web framework, you would be much better served (IMO) if you chose React, Angular, or Ember rather than GWT.

-----


I have used GWT on two from scratch front ends within the last 8 months.

All of your points are true and well written, but at the end of the day, I don't want to write and maintain large apps in JavaScript (or really in any dynamically typed language for that matter). GWT is still the best way to avoid that.

-----


Have you touched on Angular in Dart? I agree with the value of typing, but full GWT just feels very clunky.

-----


Sorry to hear you couldn't get it working. We're seeing about 5x compile time improvements in Super Dev Mode on trunk, but setup is not as easy as it could be. (It's being worked on.)

-----


Well it's no longer "Google" Web Toolkit, it's now just "GWT"; they've handed it over to a steering committee.

At the time I loved using it as it had many nice features. But sadly it's very hard to migrate from. Most importantly is the vendor lock-in with the 2 framework specific RPC mechanisms used to communicate to the server.

-----


Agreed. Even 3 decimal places wouldn't do justice to what they have done to us. Fuck those greedy bastards. If we were smart we would unionize ... err, sorry, I mean form a professional association to represent our interests. Like doctors, lawyers, accountants, etc.

-----


Why has no one mentioned jail time for breaking the law and potentially damaging people's lives and livelihood? Why do we always think money is the solution. Jobs is burning in Hell, so no hope there, but anyone else this can be attributed to should do time, not pay their body servants salary and laugh at how the poor struggle to eat.

-----


I think after 2008 it's pretty clear that executives personally don't have to fear any consequences from wrongdoing. Either someone way down the chain of command goes to jail or the shareholders pay for a settlement.

-----


So you think $324 billion dollars is appropriate? Wouldn't that essentially bankrupt all the companies involved? Who needs to worry about jobs when some of the biggest tech firms on the planet are wiped out! Not to mention that $324 billion spread across 64000 plaintiffs is $5 million each... You wouldn't be looking for that easy windfall, now would you?

-----


If I go with your figure of 64,000 * 5,000,000, it's not the tech-apocalypse. It's not like that money is going straight into a crack pipe.

People with a lot of technical know-how would suddenly be set loose in a cash rich environment full of new millionaires who are looking to build their own empires.

That scenario could very well be a second dotcom boom.

More to the point, when one of the little people gets caught breaking the law, we don't question the consequences their punishment will have on any industry. These companies not only broke the law but were terrible corporate citizens.

Anything that doesn't hurt a lot will not be an appropriate punishment, it'll just be considered the cost of doing business.

-----


The effect of this scenario on the high end real estate market in the Bay Area would horrifying / amazing depending on whether or not you were already holding property.

Also, Tesla sales would go sub-orbital.

-----


You go directly from "tech firms wiped out apocalypse" to "64000 plaintiffs [..] $5 million each" and don't notice the disconnect?

Frankly, that needs to happen, and not only when theres cause. We need a Netflix chaos monkey that breaks up big companies and redistributes their wealth to let creative destruction create something better.

-----


My post is more about the hypocrisy OS peterb stating "fuck those greedy bastards" while also implying that every plaintiff should get $5 million.

-----


Apple has ~$160 billion in cash reserves.

Google has ~$35 billion.

I'm not presenting that as an argument about the reasonableness of $300 billion, but it would likely not bankrupt them.

-----


How would an amount that is greater than the cash of the two combined companies not bankrupt them?

-----


It need not be instantly due and there cash flow positive. 15b each per year and there done in 10 years and still profitable.

Also, free cash is hardly their only capital. Google could for example sell YouTube. They could also sell bonds or stock etc.

PS: Not that I think 300B is the right penalty, but there needs to be some real risks to prevent such behaviors or the penalties simply become yet another cost of doing business.

-----


True but it seems hard to argue that the amount can reasonably be more than all of the cash on hand, since the companies wouldn't have been able to pay the employees anything like that amount, so it can't reflect the market value of the lost salaries.

-----


It's common for lawsuits to be for damages * X where X is a distinctive. IMO 10B is about the limit for any kind of reasonable penalty though.

-----


The only real effect of bankruptcy would be that guys like Page and Brin would be worth $13 billion instead of $26.

Assuming that it would actually bankrupt them, how does bankruptcy cost jobs?

The cash goes to employees who will likely spend / re-invest in the startup economy, this will likely create more jobs as there are economies of scale in software companies.

The capital remains and would be sold to a new owner... since these companies are profitable the jobs remain and the company just has a lower bank account with new owners.

If you had the opportunity to buy Google/Apple/Adobe for 50 cents on the dollar, why would you fire everyone? It makes no sense, they are all extremely profitable companies.

-----


> Wouldn't that essentially bankrupt all the companies involved?

The sensible thing to do in these types of circumstances is to pay the settlement using newly issued shares in the company. That dilutes the interest of all the existing shareholders (effectively the money comes out of their pockets because the price per share goes down) but it causes no damage to the company's operations.

-----


Yes, plus the executives involved should be personally punished through financial loss and imprisonment.

-----


"Wouldn't that essentially bankrupt all the companies involved?"

Don'd do the crime if you can't do the time, etc.

-----


$300 billion dollars isn't enough?

-----


But I can blame companies for conspiring to hire the best trained people to do a given job at the lowest possible price. H-1B visas, offshoring, anti-compete clauses and non-poaching agreements are their key tactics.

-----


Jeff Bezos is using Bill Gates' playbook from the 1990's: build alternatives to the most popular apps on your platform; bundle them; and improve app quality over time. This business strategy is very hard for a company like dropbox to compete against, even if they have better IP/quality/features.

Edit: we can also expect Amazon versions of "knife the baby", "cut off their air supply" and "DOS ain't done until Lotus won't run".

-----


One big thing Zacolo has over Dropbox is cheaper pricing. Dropbox for Business is $15/mo [1] per user (can be up to 30% cheaper if you pay in-full for a year), where-as Zacolo is $5/mo [2] per user. That'll put downward pressure on Dropbox's corporate pricing unless they have much better service, or much better features, than Amazon.

[1] https://www.dropbox.com/business/buy [2] https://aws.amazon.com/zocalo/pricing/

-----


I'm a dropbox customer. I'll be staying with them for the foreseeable future, but I'm glad to see competition might bring me more space and/or cheaper pricing.

-----


Must be because Dropbox still use Amazon services to store client files.

-----


Can you expand on the "knife the baby" move? That one's not in my playbook. Is a riff off the Solomon/baby story?

-----


http://www.businessweek.com/microsoft/updates/up81105b.htm

-----


i have to laugh at this. the main point of quicktime was to work as bait and switch. and microsoft having invented the tactics, defended against it.

after microsft lost that one, apple itself made quicktime (and then itunes) incredible slow and bogus on windows. while previous versions were just fine.

-----


Did that really happen? My iTunes library lived primarily on a Windows box until 2 years ago and the only weirdness I can think of was Apple breaking some of Microsoft's windowing conventions.

To be fair, the MS Office experience on OS X is about the same: pretty normal with some things slightly off.

-----


Yes. Quicktime back then was like having AIDS; you didn't want your friends to find out it was on your box.

-----


if itunes and quicktime was never slow on your windows box, then i can say with certainty that you changed computers at least every year and always to expensive models.

-----


sp332 got it. They also used "knife the baby" internally to kill any project that could impact Windows/Office.

-----


I agree, this might cut into more of box.net's offering than dropbox though.

-----


Afaik, it's not competitively priced for large volume. We priced around 650 users for box, and it came out to be roughly $8K annually. At $5/month/user, the Amazon offering would be roughly $40K annually. I'd actually prefer to go the Amazon route, but they're going to have to offer volume discounts to make it compelling.

-----


If you have 650 users (who I'm assuming are paid employees), doesn't the cost become marginal in comparison to improved productivity?

I would guess the time to re-train all 650 on a new platform and the ease of transferring existing files would be more meaningful than the price difference.

-----


$8k annually for 650 users is about $1 per month per user vs a $15 list price. Is that right?

-----


I'm actually waiting for clarification on this...I think my team might've misinterpreted the quote, and if so, Amazon would be significantly cheaper. I'll update as soon as I know (most likely Monday).

-----


Is there anywhere to view analysis of gates' business strategies over the years? Article, book, anything?

-----


I've enjoyed reading the various strategy memos that emerged as part of the DoJ's antitrust case.

-----


Hey Patrick, do you have a link to a collection of those?

-----


http://antitrust.slated.org/www.iowaconsumercase.org/

-----


Do you have a link or something?

-----


FireOS ain't done until Google Play won't run?

-----


More like "S3 ain't shipping until dropbox files are missing" or "EC2 doesn't go until Netflix is slow".

-----


Straight out of Dealing With Darwin, by Geoffrey Moore, too.

-----


i.e. anti-trust violations

-----


It was anticompetitive for Microsoft in the mid-90s because they had a very solid monopoly over the personal computer operating system market. A case against Amazon would be much weaker because they don't even have a majority of the market much less a monopoly.

-----


You shouldn't have to already be a monopoly to have your acts qualified as anti-trust. Just like the law should punish you for trying to scam people even though your scam didn't work.

Otherwise, everyone would at least try to scam everyone else and would at least try to become a monopoly, since it costs nothing unless you win. And if you do win, the fine won't reach the amount you put in the bank (at least in the case of monopolies, e.g Microsoft).

-----


Yeah, but there's nothing inherintely wrong with creating a lot of products. Look at 3M or DuPont.

This argument might be better applied to what is going on with Hatchet right now.

-----


Unfortunately, antitrust cases are aimed at market share, rather than how the market share was acquired or what business practices the firm uses.

-----


Speaking broadly, that's not true. Monopolies are not intrinsically illegal. Antitrust law is specifically about business practices, and the notion that monopolies have to be more restricted because they can use their domination of one market to affect related markets. What got Microsoft into trouble wasn't having 90% of the operating system market, it was the allegation that they were using that monopoly to take over the nascent browser market, force OEMs to accept terms that prevented alternative OSes from competing on level ground, and so on.

I suspect Amazon is on their way to running afoul of such laws, or would be if the current business climate wasn't comparatively hostile to the notion of this kind of regulation. I don't think, however, that Zocalo is going to be a piece that attracts much attention; it's going to be the way Amazon seems to increasingly deal with their suppliers in Walmart-esque fashion. (Walmart was notorious for going beyond merely asking for "large customer" discounts and heading into "we will tell you what wholesale price we're going to pay, and you will either make it work or you'll lose the 60-70% of your business we represent.")

-----


While your description of antitrust law is both commonly held and comparatively reasonable, it is unfortunately not always accurate in the United States. For a particularly egregious case, see US v. Alcoa, where the aluminum company was judged to be in violation of the Sherman Antitrust Act simply for having a high market share, despite there being no accusation of any specific anti-competitive business practices.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Alcoa

-----


Yes, it is called competition. :)

-----


I tried to get my son into Scratch, but he didn't like it. He loves hacking on Lua code in the Roblox game.

-----

More

Applications are open for YC Summer 2016

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: