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The title should be, The Self of Exposure Fiction.

Here's a potential start-up idea: a marketplace/crowdfunding platform for private shows and concerts.

One still trying: http://www.gigit.com/ One failed: http://netacceleration.com/as_hil

Here it is: http://www.liveondemand.com/

> Are you still on MongoDB?

> Oh god no.

Pretty damning condemnation of MongoDB, no?

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For our use case, it just wasn't the right fit. In particular: 1) we needed more features/performance than Mongo's aggregation framework provided, 2) the mongod global lock was prohibitive for our write throughout (turning off fsync wasn't suitable), 3) schema migrations were difficult/impossible without transactional guarantees.

It seems like Mongo's addressed some of these concerns since we started building Heap.

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Humm... No

They also outgrew PostgreSQL, and gave up on Redshift, is that a condemnation of them as well?

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Looks like they are still using PostgreSQL, just not a single instance. It looks like they are using Citus Data to handling sharding and merging responses.

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He said that PostgreSQL scaled pretty well, but he got rid of MongoDB in one week. Seems pretty damning to me.

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Odd that they think they outgrew postgresql, while only dealing with a tiny 30k tps.

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Is it necessary to hijack the top comment in the discussion thread of OP's awesome app with your shitty, negative "rap" lyrics?

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I always found HNSearch[1] to be excellent, but it's good to see a little competition.

[1]: https://www.hnsearch.com/

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Thanks! It's great to hear you found HNSearch useful. We were very happy to power search for HN but we haven't been able to dedicate much time to making it better. It's exciting to see Algolia iterating on HN's search functionality.

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If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

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If anyone from HNSearch is listening:

You should default to HTTPS for all links to HN.

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Right, working on it.

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I see you felt the need to add a footnote when there was only one link[1].

[1]: Unnecessary

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Fully unnecessary comment, knowing you otherwise understand.

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Short names weren't really a mistake when K&R made them.

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Yes, for some time (the dark ages I like to think) programmers had to sacrifice productivity to make things faster, or to make them fit in memory. The original C compiler had a 6 character limit on variable names, leading to abominations like `strstr()`.

Fortunately, by the Pentium era, which was when PHP was designed, those times were long gone.

"X made this design decision before us" is never a good justification for any design decision unless the decision is truly arbitrary (i.e., are arrays 0 or 1 indexed?) -- then it might be better to stick to what's more familiar. If it was a good design decision then, then there must have been some reason at the time that should be true now to give a good case for repeating a design decision.

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I find the juxtaposition between PHP's short function names taken from C, and things like T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM to be rather funny.

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recently(not quite) there was a talk in php internals about changing that.

read this:

http://philsturgeon.co.uk/blog/2013/09/t-paamayim-nekudotayi...

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Well, so long as they don't fix the parsing of octal int literals that is okay. Loosing both of my favourite offhand complaints would be rather disappointing. ;)

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Never seen that one, but I think it's cute.

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Any notable companies using RethinkDB in production?

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Slava @ rethink here. There are hundreds of really cool production use cases of RethinkDB that we know of. We'll be publishing a "who's using it" page soon (we have tons of work and haven't gotten around to this bit yet, but will soon).

Note that Rethink is still in beta. Lots of companies already use it in production, but we advise people to test carefully until we ship a long term support (LTS) release. We'll also offer commercial support options then.

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If your passions don't pay well, you're probably not making something people want.

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This is possibly the most misguided comment I've read on HN.

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What are some passions that people have, which other people greatly desire, that are not paid well? I am genuinely curious.

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Academia/research. I was making more than some of my world class professors a few years into my career, where I was using research they developed and improved upon.

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A thousand times this. Markets automatically value knowledge and discoveries at nothing because you typically have to possess knowledge (sometimes for 100 years) before you can estimate its value. If the development of a new industry goes through stages "A B C D ... X Y Z," where A-M are academic discoveries, the market awards 100% of the profit to N-Z and maybe a percent or two to M if they got lucky with patents, even though A-M required significant capital expenditure to carry out.

Everything we care about has been touched by uncompensated academics in some way (uncompensated = rewarded with <1% of the produced value for the purposes of argument). Much of the Nitrogen in your body comes from the Haber process. The air you breathe has benefited from emission reduction chemistry figured out by academics. The basis for the chemistry that produced the plastics around you was all figured out by academics (albeit tested, refined, and implemented by better paid engineers). Academic physicists made semiconductor models that formed the basis of simulations that made the industry practical. If you're not on Windows, academics wrote a healthy chunk of the OS on your computer. Physicists figured out the details of nuclear energy (in the US, 20% of the energy you are using right now) and built models that are used to a significant degree in the engineering of all of the others. Scientists are going to be responsible for pulling our collective asses out of the fire wrt global warming. The more I write the more I realize (and hopefully you realize) just how silly this train of thought is. As for mathematics, where would engineers be without linear algebra or calculus? How much less efficient would industry be without linear programming (programming = schedule making in this context)? It's impossible to even formulate these thoughts correctly because everything is interrelated.

I challenge you (great?-grandparent libertarian) to find an industry that does not inextricably depend upon some kind of model or fact produced by uncompensated academics (as defined above -- use any threshold for value capture you deem appropriate).

Whatever the market rewards people for, it is not value creation. It is value creation multiplied by a long list of factors which often go to 0 for arbitrary reasons (your customers are too poor, your product is not excludable, etc.)

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Fortunately, people are not rational actors wrt accumulating money. Here's what future career paths very roughly look like for new grads (based on my own perceptions, not glassdoor):

Helping the poor: $0 (maybe $12k if you count a fellowship)

Trying to Cure Cancer: $25k/yr, bump to $40k after 6 years

Engineering Medical Devices, Airplanes, etc: $60k/yr

Trying to Build the Next Twitter: $100k/yr-$150k/yr

Helping Rich People Game the System to Get Richer: $150k/yr, $300k/yr after a few years if successful

What disturbs me is that if I were to prioritize this list based on benefit to humanity, it would take the exact opposite ordering. There was <1% chance of that happening randomly.

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Music. You can have hundreds of thousands of fans and still not be able to quit your day job.

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What is a fan? Someone who gave your music a thumbs up? Or something willing to pay for the music you produced because they desire it so much? I have a feeling if you have hundreds of thousands of the latter you'd be in good shape.

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I can't tell how serious the question is, but: how about anything that serves the poor, such as providing warm clothing for the homeless in the winter? Providing dental care for drug addicts?

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If nothing else, he kind of slipped in the 'people desire'. Why is that a requirement for a passion? As in, why is the requirement that one should be making it for other people? E.g. what if you are really into scuba diving?

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Because that is the premise in pdog's comment which you were refuting as misguided.

You are free to do whatever you want (and not what other people desire) if you are self sufficient enough to not need anything from others (highly unlikely).

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So if I like to go scuba diving, which doesn't pay me well at all, I must therefore not be making something people want?

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Probably not while you are scuba diving. Unless you are an instructor and someone wants lessons from you.

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Commercial pilot.

Pays well once you've invested your life in it. Starting out, though, you're looking at $50k+ to get the required ratings, while being paid $25k/yr to start.

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That is simply because no one desires an inexperienced pilot (ATP requires 1500 hours). I went to Embry Riddle and many of my friends are pilots. I understand how rough it is.

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Caring for family.

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Or, we could automate production and distribution so everyone's happy.

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From the article, the Eightfold Path to Monad Satori:

    Don't read the monad tutorials.
    No really, don't read the monad tutorials.
    Learn about Haskell types.
    Learn what a typeclass is.
    Read the Typeclassopedia[1].
    Read the monad definitions.
    Use monads in real code.
    Don't write monad-analogy tutorials.
[1]: http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Typeclassopedia

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