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In video form: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05WS0WN7zMQ

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At an initial glance, I think you're describing nested transactions.

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Peter Norvig also has two implementations of Prolog in Paradigms of AI Programming (first one is interpreted, second is complied) in Common Lisp. The book is highly recommended because Norvig's code is very elegant and his exposition is wonderful.

Allegro Prolog [1] is based on Norvig's implementation, although I'm sure they've done a fair bit of optimizing.

[1]: http://www.franz.com/products/prolog/

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Yeah, I've heard. I really need to acquire and work through that book.

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You should totally do it... it's fantastic. Norvig makes it quite clear in the beginning that he expects you to know atleast some lisp beforehand (the "intro" chapter is a bit sparse), so you might want to brush you on your CL skills before you dive in.

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I think I will. I'm fairly novice at CL, and it would be good to learn it.

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Franz supports a port of his Prolog in their AllegroGraph products, in addition to Allegro Prolog.

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> "I believe there is an exception if any extensions are broken by a new release"

Are you talking about extensions that I already have installed or any extension on AMO that might not work with the new version?

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I believe Chris Soghoian was the person who discovered the bug (there was an HN submission about this earlier).

http://twitter.com/#!/csoghoian

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Yeah, that's kind of what I'm curious about: did Dropbox learn about it through that guy's discovery? If so, we're lucky that that guy came across it the very same day the bug was introduced. I'd assume there aren't that many people who would have found the security hole, been nice not to abuse it and cared enough to let Dropbox and the world know…

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The older EOPLs are much longer then the newer ones. I've found that the 1st edition requires less sophistication than the 3rd and spends more time explaining things. You might want to take a look at it.

There's also "design concepts in programming languages".

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Thanks, I'll check them out.

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Here's a userscript to disable that theater view:

https://userscripts.org/scripts/show/97052

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I found it worthwhile to read the erlang books concurrently. Other than a few misalignments, they present topics in roughly the same order, but the way they explained the different topics were different enough that I found myself learning something new.

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how ironic that you would read 2 erlang books concurrently.

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Almost everyone registers for atleast 4 courses a term. You need to work on all of them because every course counts. However, when you're going to take the Junior Lab (if you're in Physics) or the digital death lab/ software labs (if you're in EECS), you take classes that are relatively easy. For example, you might take extra humanities classes to work on the HASS requirement and then in a later semester not take the humanities class and replace them with courses in your own major.

I don't know about the junior lab (i'm in eecs), but when I take classes that are difficult (which has been pretty much every semester for the past 2 years :(), I am working overtime on these classes. Besides attending lectures/recitations during the day, I spend every evening, and all of my weekend coding for the projects. Having projects and labs that took over 20-30 hours to complete were the norm, and in a particularly bad semester, I'd have one of those due almost every two weeks.

Initially, there would be people who could get by without putting in as much effort because they already knew the material, but as you go higher and start talking about lab classes (where the work is punishing regardless of your knowledge/experience) or graduate classes (very intensive, almost no one can coast), you don't see people coasting.

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I think there's a misunderstanding about how the class actually works.

First off, this is for students in Aero-Astro program. It's not something that all engineers take; it's simply the starting courses for the aero astro people.

Second, even though the name suggests that it's some course that tries to teach you the intersection of all the topics, it's actually teaching you the union of the topics. From the course overview:

"Over the course of each semester, students engage in seven disciplines of study, listed below. Each discipline is taught for a fraction of the semester, through a series of lectures. When one discipline concludes, students are quizzed and begin a new discipline."

Similarly, if you look at the calendar ( http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/aeronautics-and-astronautics/16-0... ). You see that the students are essentially taking each sub-course separately.

It's more for scheduling convenience and to have the students up and running with all fields in Aero-Astro than to do some grand unification of these topics.

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