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Consumed fast food this weekend (the specific chain shall remain nameless) and while I was able to deal with the low food quality (just barely), the cleanliness of the restaurant, and poor management (no management?) of the staff made the experience much worse.

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Bought a smart TV (not exactly on purpose, just wanted a new TV) - ended up being quite happy with built in support for Netflix as it means one less "box" in my living room.

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I was under the impression (maybe it's wrong), that good deal of US company value is tied to patents, and IP in general. Reforming the patent system would effectively destroy, or reduce the value of these (in some cases very large and important) patents and therefore harm businesses in the short term. This doesn't seem like something Congress, or US lawmakers would be addressing with gusto.

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I don't see any admission or indication of "hacking".

Unprofessional? - if "professional" means keeping quiet, reporting it authorities (who don't care and can't do anything about it) and riding quietly into the sunset call me unprofessional any day.

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Please take this in the spirit it is intended:

I would never under any circumstances ever share personal information with a company that behaved as you have documented.

You believe this guy has scammed you so you went through his personal artifacts and shared communications to get vigilante justice. Fair enough as a person I dont blame you and find it funny, as a business you just cannot be trusted with personal information.

In the grand scheme of things, all you really illustrated is that for 25K empireflippers is willing to 'hack' someone who as you say yourself hasnt been established guilty beyond a reasonable doubt, but who you have 'good enough' info on.

'Professional' means operating by a business driven code of behavior. You let this issue become 'Personal', and as such took steps to get 'revenge'. You literally committed crimes during the course of getting revenge, and you 'transparently' confessed to these crimes in writing on a public forum that is tied to your 'professional' endeavor. You should have consulted a lawyer both before you took these steps, and before you confessed to taking this steps.

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I can appreciate where you're coming from here, I really can.

I will say that we did consult our lawyer before writing this post, actually.

Additionally - business is done on trust. Some will read this and (like you) not trust us and won't do business with us. Others will appreciate it and do business with us. No worries either way.

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Did your lawyer seriously say that posting this is OK? I'm having really hard time believing that.

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Keep in mind he didn't vet the ACTUAL post before I pushed it live.

In reading it back, I wouldn't say he was enthusiastically pushing it or anything:

"I think you guys have your minds made up. The reality is the risk is probably low. Truth is an absolute defense to defamation. It's unlikely a couple Russians would try to sue you, but you never know. My boring attorney answer is try not to go too far to minimize any risk. Stick to the verifiable facts."

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Honestly, you might seriously want to consider getting a new lawyer. No good lawyer would ever tell you that it's ok to publicly admit to a felony just because it's unlikely that you'll get sued.

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I'm not the author of the post, only defending it (somewhat).

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Hacking is what a person does in violation of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986[1]. Which doesn't discuss needing to actively try to break encryption or exploit a security vulnerability but rather talks about accessing something to which you do not have permission.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_Fraud_and_Abuse_Act

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I stand corrected - although my comment was tailored for a community (HN) that usually get's all worked up about the use of the term "hacking" (and others) when it comes to computer crime.

If this was an article about the US Government convicting or charging people for "hacking" we'd most likely see numerous comments and complaints here about the improper use of the word.

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Rare to see a write up like this where they not only expose the scammers (by name), but also share their personal information.

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I wasn't sure about publishing, but now that I did I'm glad it's out there.

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About last name: letter Ц from Cyrillic alphabet can be transcripted as ts, c, tc, so all variations are correct.

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The certainty of guilt aside - I applaud this calculated risk as the alternative relegates the perpetrators to anonymous status ("russian hackers") which negates the gravity of their actions.

Personalizing the scammers makes this situation "real" and while it may not lead to an arrest, it will at least give a precedent for how to handle (or maybe not?) those deemed "above the law" because of their nationality or physical location (outside the US).

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Pretty good list - I did take some issue with 2. Charge based on the value, not time.

In a small local market (where referrals and transparency are key), charging clients different rates for similar services can present an issue.

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"the blue e" is how pretty much every "normal" person I know refers to Internet Explorer.

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Much of that functionality has been moved to "search". While I wasn't a big user of Discover and Activity, it seems global trends show on the default search screen.

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I don't think Gabe's response was the result of a thorough financial analysis or specifically limited to just the costs of email. He probably did some "napkin" math and thought "shit, this probably cost us $1 mil when you add it all up"

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They make a lot of money from casual purchases of in-game items and the games themselves. Every day someone's too irate to purchase something is lost revenue.

It probably hit them harder than that, it'll take time to see what kind of a dent sales in add-ons have taken.

Honestly, I thought it was a good idea, funding mod makers to do even better work directly, but maybe they should've stuck to a new game to launch that idea rather than push it back into existing titles where people might get miffed their formerly free mods go paid.

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The proclivity of hipster-douches with full sleeve tattoos in tech makes this even more shocking.

All jokes aside (I can live with the downvotes), I could see this easily falling through the cracks for a company new to wearables. What about hairy arms? What about skinny arms?

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