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The first line on ML: "Magic Lantern is a free firmware addon for Canon EOS DSLR cameras that adds a host of features to assist photographers and videographers."

Read it again: it is free. If you really need QoS, pay someone to develop and code review the firmware. I am not being a troll, some people just have so much self-entitlement on something that is free.

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Well; it really depends on your jurisdiction, but you should know that there is such a thing as consumer protection and tort liability --yes, even for things you get for free, like FOSS. See for instance [1,2].

Also, in the specific case of FOSS, this kind of jackass-ery might soon come to an end anyway if/when the EU and UK follows through with their (relatively) recent moves to introduce stronger software liability provisions (eg [3]).

[1] http://www.ifross.org/en/what-legal-standard-liability-and-w...

[2] http://www.daviddfriedman.com/Academic/Course_Pages/21st_cen...

[3] http://www.techweekeurope.co.uk/workspace/analysts-warn-[3] vendors-on-software-liability-7284

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All these articles only mentioned the possibility of liability. [1] most probably translated from German, and I cannot really understand what the translated text means, so I have no comment.

[2]: It doesn't say for sure one will be liable "it is difficult to determine with any certainty: (1) whether open source software licenses will be enforceable, (2) whether open source software copyright will be valid, or (3) whether open source software licenses will subject developers to tort liability." [3] is more on vendor, which quite specifically on transaction that carries monetary value. It is debatable if one still be regarded as vendor even if he doesn't sell stuff. I will give the article benefit of doubt.

Truth be told, the first successful litigation basically will turn off most contributors: no one can be sure their codes are totally bug-free. Even if that person totally wants to do good.

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> some people just have so much self-entitlement on something that is free

Self-entitlement would be expecting personal customer support. Finding out the firmware is buggy BY DESIGN is reason would seem to be a perfectly good reason to dismiss the firmware.

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Do you do job-based consultation? Say one has a project/website, and that person has some marketing goals in mind, can you quote a price instead? Also, any guarantee on effectiveness?

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Projects I take on aside from this I usually tie goals and performance metrics to. It very much depends on the goals and objectives to be achieved for the project.

For example if your project is to take an iOS app from 100 users to 1,000,000. That I wouldn't take on as a project, that's what someone should take on as a career/job more than a contract. 100 users to 10,000 is something I would consider freelance/contract size.

Marketers on Demand was setup as a test of the 7 Day Startup framework and to run an idea validation thought. Not really for full on projects.

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I see. Make sense. Thanks

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Will I be labelled a troll if I say after reading this, the first thing come to my mind is to fix the US income tax system instead of Apple's?

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Curious the use of this language in industry. Appreciate if someone can share the use of Racket in production.

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My craft + tech startup www.youpatch.com uses Racket for the clever bits: image-processing, pdf generation, and I find it's great for prototyping and R&D. Here's my talk wide-ranging talk about it (video and slides) http://agile-jitsu.blogspot.com.au/2015/01/my-talk-at-racket...

Also at RacketCon 2014 Brian Masterbrook talked about using Racket at www.airstash.com for testing hardware: links at con.racket-lang.org

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Dan Liebgold (Naughty Dog) at RacketCon 2013.

"Racket on the Playstation 3? It's Not What you Think!"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSmqbnhHp1c

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Racket is the runtime powering HN. Arc targets it.

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I use Racket to run an internal website for few hundreds of T.A. in my department in the university. I like that everything is escaped automatically, so you don't have to worry that someone try to use "<script>alert('test');</script>" as name.

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I doubt Metro can keep the money. There is an escheatment law whereby unclaimed money will need to be turned over to the state. It is a big hassle to them IMHO.

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Agree with some of the earlier comments: the diamond-shaped thingies inserted are really a nuisance and breaks the reading flow.

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Indeed. Whenever you break convention like underlined and colored text for links you in general need to have a good reason.

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Maybe only because it's unfamiliar. After all, other punctuation doesn't break your flow. And trying to figure out whether something is a link or not also breaks flow.

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The real question is why someone would change something most people already getting used to. I don't see any compelling reason to change the link in this way, do you?

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This reminds of the polymorphic viruses in MS-DOS/Windows era (very likely they still exist, but I didn't look for long time) where they would dynamically generate the decryption/encryption routines and changed their code appearances to thwart signature-based antivirus scanners. As such, maybe it would be fun to add self-modifying codes so that 1) precision is reduced 2) performance is also randomly reduced. The longer you run this baby, the slower and less precise it would be. ;)

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> very likely they still exist

Sadly. They're one of the more complex malware types.

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Square is a payment processor, and does not wear the merchant hat. Even if it sells the data, the merchants acquiring the data still needs to pay, bumping up the cost of business.

On the other hand, Amazon is _both_ payment processor and merchant. First it gets transaction fees (due to its volume, I guess it is paying around 1-2% for card transactions) from merchants, not a lot, but I doubt it really cares or plans to earn money from transactions. Second it gets sales analytics, and third, it can adjust its online strategies to match the trends it sees in this data. I would say #2 and #3 would be the whole point of launching this.

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Also, I guess most of the merchants who sign up will be first-timers who accept cash before. Information from these people are what Amazon needs. Let's say in certain region there has been high sales of tea cups, I won't be surprised if one day Amazon starts suggesting its tea cup selections to buyers from that region, with free shipping and lower prices...

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In this game, one of the factors is frauds. The solution provider who is able to keep fraud rate under control will have an advantage.

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Right and those two players are google and apple. Phone-present transactions with strong authentication and irrefutability would be far cheaper to process. Google had been screwing the pooch for years with android wallet. They should have owned this market years ago.

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