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Imagine it was really hard to get two twins with such different exercise patterns, unless one developed a brain tumor. A study showing the twin with less exercise was less healthy wouldn't mean much.

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I fell in love with Git because I could do frequent local commits that matched my workflow, only "publishing" them when it was appropriate, in the format I wanted. Git did this for me, Subversion didn't.

I know that concept does not have to be inherent to the D in DVCS. But for me that was the killer feature. It changed everything for me. The gain from being able to do that dwarfed all the costs of learning Git.

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This post clicked for me. I tried and failed to use it once before, read this today and it worked immediately.

Thanks!

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This concept is exactly where I predict things will/should go. No idea if this particular product is any good though.

It's wasteful and expensive to duplicate components across many devices. Have them in one device, with other devices sharing them / as dumb terminals to them. If I want to do something on my phone, but on a big screen, I should be able to pull out a big dumb screen that talks to my phone. Of course in this scenario replace "phone" with "hub."

Counterpoint: as we gain the tech to do this kind of things, the hardware may become so cheap that we gain very little cost savings from not duplicating most of it.

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Isn't this essentially the model for wearables already? Except with the opposite relationship: the phone is the smart device and the watch is relatively "dumb". This makes sense since it is easier for my phone to be much larger and more powerful, I can also take it out of my pocket if it gets too hot, etc. It looks like in this case they've made the watch smart and the larger screen dumb, which is novel, but I'm not sure I see the advantages. Also, I am much more apt to lose my watch than my phone, but maybe that is just me.

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I don't know if the advanced stats themselves give Garnett his full due, but I feel like the members of the analytics community give Garnett his due, no question. He was truly amazing, likely the best player in the league for a stretch.

On the MIN team that won 58 games, the rest of the team in descending minutes order was

Latrell Sprewell Sam Cassell Trenton Hassell Fred Hoiberg Mark Madsen Gary Trent

THEY WON FIFTY EIGHT GAMES!!!!

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What I love is the beautifully pure metric offered by the 2008 trade, where they gave up KG and basically nothing, received a de-factor All Star (Jefferson) + some other stuff in return, and imploded to a degree that is rarely seen in the league.

It's funny for a 20-10-5 guy to be chronically under-rated form a stats POV, but I think he was. I always tell people he was like having some kind of die-roll modifier: opposing teams took -3 on all rolls, and members of his team got +3. 20-10-5 doesn't begin to show everything he did.

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It's the War and Peace of somewhat convincing sports arguments.

http://skepticalsports.com/?page_id=1222

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Upvoting for the link, and for your summary.

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What a great book. I love it because even though everything in it is currently future-tech, almost everything seems almost within reach. It all seems so plausible.

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Accelerando by Charles Stross is also a fun book. Stross recently commented, https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8939946

"My opinions have shifted in the past 10-15 years and I now think that permitting autonomous corporations to exist -- or even continuing the doctrine of corporate personhood -- are a terrible idea for humanity (because they're effectively AIs that compete with us, and not in a good way)."

Book is free online, http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/fiction/accelera...

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Rats! I was going to make the Accelerando connection too! While we are on the subject of being outcompeted, Saturn's Children is also a pretty good read.

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Thanks for the pointer!

http://www.antipope.org/charlie/blog-static/2013/07/crib-she...

"A society that runs on robot slaves who are, nevertheless, intelligent by virtue of having a human neural connectome for a brain, is a slave society ... The human society underpinning "Saturn's Children" got into bad trouble, relying on robot slaves as labour and disappearing up its own arse in the pursuit of virtual luxury."

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Which book? I didn't see a book (title) referenced above.

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Daemon

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daemon_(novel_series)

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I hate this example. It's not blind, it's deceptive. It's funny, but it proves nothing.

I agree with the general inability of wine tasters to discern nearly as much as they believe, just not this particular example.

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I went back and looked up the details. It turns out that the protocol was that they were served two glasses of wine, one red, one white. They were actually the same (white) wine. The red wine had (flavorless) food coloring added. Yes, it's deceptive, but this sort of deception is common is psychological studies. I'd say it's fair game in this case.

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No it's really unfair and a stunt.

Expecting to taste a red wine and getting a disguised white wine means you're not ready to appreciate a white wine. It's a whole different world so no wonder they found it off.

It would have actually been a better call to stick to white wine, no coloring added, and differentiate only with the label.

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> differentiate only with the label

They've done studies like that too, with similar results.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/jun/23/wine-tas...

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Sorry to blame the victim, but I'm gonna have to.

You took weeks of vitally important notes in the Barnes and Noble app on your Android Tablet? With no attempt at any point to save them elsewhere? I would find this to be an insanely bad idea even if I hadn't read this post

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You mean like people write notes on paper and they don't mysteriously disappear when you buy a new pen?

It's pretty standard to warn people of destructive actions.

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Competition is good, so I say hooray for this.

That said, doesn't seem to offer a compelling alternative to Github, based on what they're currently saying. There could be value in tight integration with other Amazon tools, but that seems like it'll come more from intentional lock-in than added value.

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Github is also very vulnerable on price if you have the need for a lot of small, private repos. If Amazon charges on storage (like they do with S3) instead of the number of repos, it will make this a compelling alternative for a lot of businesses.

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Bitbucket is excellent for that use case. In fact, github often isn't even an option since even the largest plan is limited to 125 private repos. Bitbucket, meanwhile, has no limits on the number of repos (it's a fee per user instead)

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> even the largest plan is limited to 125 private repos

Leaving the conversation about small plans aside, we can set up a plan for you that has as many private repositories as you need. Just email sales@github.com and we can get it set up for you.

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Bitbucket is superb overall - the issue tracker, wiki and pricing are so much better than Github.

The only thing that Bitbucket devs wont add is gist :(

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As far as I can tell, VS Online also allows "unlimited" projects and repos per project. And TFS's non-SCM features are pretty nice. Plus it's free for the first 5 users.

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GitHub is priced by repo, BitBucket is priced by user, and both non-negligible. I'm looking forward to knowing Amazon's pricing and web UI.

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Surely they will follow suit as their other apps and price by actual usage with no 'unlimited' this or that.

Something like http://aws.amazon.com/s3/pricing/ combo of storage + requests

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Our company has more than 125 private repos on GitHub. It just requires contacting their sales department first.

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I don't know. I used to work for AWS, and this sounds very link an internal tool that is used to manage the entire Amazon retail infrastructure. That being the case, this is going to be a lot more powerful and useful for online infrastructure (in AWS, obviously) than anything else out there. Even if it's not all that initially, I suspect the extra functionality will come sooner rather than later.

It's somewhat annoying I know, but I'm not going to go into more detail as I'm not sure about the legality of my position should I do so.

Edit: On review of their website, I had missed the announcements for Amazon CodePipeline and Amazon CodeDeploy, which between them provide all the missing functionality I hinted at above. And so yes, it looks like this is the internal tool I was referring to.

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In the announcement they said they are basically releasing Apollo.

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CodeDeploy is essentially Apollo (lite, so to speak). CodePipelines is Amazon Pipelines. CodeCommit is persumably Amazon GitFarm (according to our former AWS engineer here).

We've got an amazing Builder Tools team here at Amazon, I must say.

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Apollo(http://aws.amazon.com/codedeploy) is nice, but Pipelines are easily my favorite internal tool, glad they are releasing it.

http://aws.amazon.com/codepipeline/

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> That said, doesn't seem to offer a compelling alternative to Github

I have limited (but at lease some) experience in working with GitHub Enterprise, and for the longest time, their answer to backup was to turn the entire system offline while you performed the backup. I believe they have since improved in this area, but it was clear that while GitHub itself offers an extremely available service, GHE is severely lacking in this respect.

CodeCommit on the other hand promotes high availability from the start.

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> I believe they have since improved in this area, but it was clear that while GitHub itself offers an extremely available service, GHE is severely lacking in this respect.

That is correct. On earlier versions of GitHub Enterprise backing up data was quite a hassle. For a consistent (repository) backup taken on the VM level you didn't have to shut it down, but you've had to switch the appliance into maintenance mode, effectively preventing people from getting things done. This isn't the case anymore though as we've shipped new backup utilities [1] and support for HA setups with the 2.0.0 major release [2] some time ago.

[1] https://github.com/github/backup-utils

[2] https://enterprise.github.com/releases/2.0.0

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Weird. Why not just leverage, LVM snapshots?

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> Competition is good, so I say hooray for this.

I'm not sure how the overwhelmingly dominant player in retail and hosting moving to become the overwhelmingly dominant player in source hosting can count as "competition", except in a Gatesian sense.

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