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I've always been a fan of collecting money for solving problems and letting others worry about whether what I'm doing qualifies as "real" programming. Knowing how to listen to potential clients has gotten me a lot further than worrying whether PHP is a real programming language.

If you sign in all the previous functionality is still there. Seems their landing page is only advertising their new "Do" apps (which are a one-button extension of the old IFTTT recipes). Installed it, but never used them much.

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Many see tools like http://Zapier.com or http://elastic.io (disclaimer - I'm a founder) as alternative to Pipes and IFFT.

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But all of them seem to miss the focus on RSS, or even just the ability to manipulate feeds.

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The whole internet misses the previous focus on RSS...

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It's amazing how much a shift of management focus can change things... Google embraces RSS, develops the premiere online RSS reader, so good that even stand alone readers are largely abandoned... then google nukes RSS support from Chrome, and shutters Reader. And the world is worse off for it.

It definitely inspires a "never forget" kind of mindset, such that I don't trust relying on a SaaS that I don't have a personal exit strategy for.

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Twitter took RSS as a concept and humanized it

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RSS is an open format, Twitter is a walled garden.

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If Twitter is making it more human, I'd rather be ruled by the robot army...

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Zapier is the only reliable tool I found so far that can still import RSS to facebook pages, it tried it with pipes and it had issues with non-standard fields.

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IFTTT works well for feeds, also had good success with Huginn in the past for feeds.

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I've used Instacart in Seattle and Chicago and they've been fantastic. Although, I somewhat preferred Amazon Fresh in Seattle for the pre-6am delivery.

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After visiting a friend in Costa Rica a few years ago, I asked his address as we were leaving so I could send him stuff from the states. It was "800m up from the cemetery in [the town below his house on the mountain]".

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"... and turn left where the big tree used to be."

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I've recently become a huge fan of the simplicity of a french-press cold-brew - something I came up with on my own, while being completely unsurprised that plenty of others have as well.

Just a course grind into a French Press full of water. Leave it on the counter over night, and press in the morning. At first I was letting it steep in the fridge, but found that it steeps stronger and faster at room temperature. Sometimes I'll throw it in the fridge in the morning and let it steep longer while chilling if I know I'll want iced coffee later in the day.

Cold brew definitely seems to maintain far more flavor. And I agree that it tends to be less bitter, though I've found lowering my water temperature (regardless of method) has removed most of the bitterness in my [near-]boiling brews.

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Typing it out definitely helps with muscle memory. Every time I start trying to learn a new language, I make sure to type out all the examples I hunt down while trying to implement something.

Whether it's whitespace, or semi-colons, or brackets. After a couple days of typing everything out, they become second nature and I don't have to worry as much about syntax as I do about thinking in whatever way the language seems to flow.

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I had initially thought the same about different screens but then I saw it change on my phone.

The first time I passed by my friend's post with the photo on my facebook feed, it was white and gold. I ignored it and scrolled on. A few minutes later while scrolling back up to the top, that same exact picture (same post) was blue and black.

I've seen it switch a couple times since on my phone (nexus 4). Although on my desktop it's always white and gold.

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Did you move between different locations? The difference could come down to being outside vs. being inside - or at least eye-shot of sunlight.

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Didn't move at all - besides my finger as I scrolled through my feed. Ambient light was the same - pretty much everything was the same.

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I had laser surgery nearly a decade ago. I spent top dollar and it's been by-far the best investment I've ever made. There is one specific thing I do miss, though, which was the ability to take my glasses off and disconnect into an abstract blur. It's not something I could have done while driving or while wandering along NYC sidewalks, but while at rest, it was an occasional relief.

I don't remember my prescription anymore, because having perfect vision is so natural that I almost immediately forgot what it was like to require corrective lenses. The blurriness of the demo is definitely familiar, but the most interesting bits aren't there; To fully immerse myself into a world made immediately foreign and more interesting due to incredibly poor eyesight, relying heavily on my other senses to figure out the world around me. It was meditative in ways that merely closing my eyes is not. Like stepping into a living abstract painting and feeling my way around.

I wouldn't give up my corrected vision, but there was certainly a personal benefit to it at the very few moments when I wasn't concerning myself with the inherent downsides.

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That's what I loved about the [basically] now-deceased Actionscript 3 [1]. It was an optionally typed Javascript with compile-time and runtime checking, packages, and namespaces. It was an absolute pleasure to code with. I would generally start my prototypes untyped to get something running quickly as a throwaway, and then rewrite strictly typed as I better understood the problem. I was very happy to ditch Flash years ago, but I would have loved to have AS3 replace Javascript.

1: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ActionScript#ActionScript_3.0

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About 7 or so years ago, after wearing glasses for somewhere around 20 years, I also had my eyesight fixed.

What surprised me the most was how completely natural it was. For the first 2 weeks, I habitually tried to push my non-existent glasses up the bridge of my nose. Maybe 2 or 3 months after the procedure, I'd basically forgotten that I'd ever had glasses, except when someone reminded me.

When friends asked the difference, whether it was worth it, etc, I had a hard time relating to what it was like to have glasses / contacts. I remember the details. Doctor visits, bent rims, ordering contacts, the inability to drive, etc. But I'd completely forgotten the experience, as though I've always had perfect vision.

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That's really interesting!

I think this is the case whenever something gets simpler + more gratifying. We can remember the inconvenience of the old way of doing things, but we don't quite remember the experience- because the new experience becomes our default reality. I remember reading Francis Bacon's A New Atlantic, and thinking "This isn't really that revolutionary... it's just people doing things in a rigorous, scientific sort of manner."

(A product corollary– Consider how Google and Facebook often seem like they've always been around!)

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As a person with -0.5/-0.75 I frequently switch between wearing and not wearing glasses. I usually wear glasses at work, when watching movies, at lectures while if I'm out at night, hanging out with friends, going out or doing anything like that I usually leave the glasses of.

I often forget my glasses at home in the morning because I don't really notice that I'm not wearing them and when I'm not wearing them I sometimes think that I'm actually wearing them (this is especially common when I'm accidentally using the computer or watching a movie without glasses).

However if I've been wearing my glasses for an extended period of time (say a couple of hours) I do notice a quite marginal difference when comparing having them on to not. I don't know if it's imaginary but it's almost like my vision without glasses gets worse if I've recently been wearing glasses extensively.

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