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I agree. Which is what could be happening with companies like zenfit. http://uk.businessinsider.com/zenefits-ceo-refutes-the-naysa...

I can't possibly believe that with so many new hires the quality doesn't go down. And with the quality of the hires, also the product quality will inevitably go down.

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I have an HTC M8, I am really really happy with it. It's a solid device, snappy and good looking. All the features I could possibly want. TBH, I can hardly think of anything else that could be added to improve my experience.

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That was a very interesting read. Anyone has the same experience as a dev how hard would it be to relocate there? Also, the article mentions that tech talent is scarce, does this influences salaries in a good way?

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You seem to be from the UK. I'd move to London, Berlin or SF before considering China if what you're after is a big salary. Keep in mind that things are not as easy as they used to be for Visa either (you need a certain level of education and 2 years of professional experience relevant to your diploma).

If you're determined to move to China, I'd recommend you avoid Beijing (super polluted, hard to get around and cold as f*ck in the winter). Kunming sounds good, so does Chengdu. I personally like Xiamen, but not sure there's any real tech community there. Shenzhen, Guangzhou, Shanghai and Hangzhou are also options.

Shameless plug; for anybody interested, we're hiring in Shanghai. We work mostly with React, Node.js, Swift, Golang, Android, Python, Docker, Ansible. We build apps that matter: https://wiredcraft.com/about/#jobs

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Another option if you are willing to strike out on your own or invest some time up front is to go somewhere cheaper without the Beijing/other large city problems of air pollution, climate, traffic and cost. This will allow you to tackle language and culture challenges on your own terms and timeframe without breaking the bank. Personally I love it here in Kunming! The weather is great, air quality and traffic is still OK, nature is on your doorstep and you can easily rent a reasonably sized place (eg. 3 bedrooms) for 2000元 per month (ie. USD$75/week). Plus, great international community and direct flights to other places (Thailand, India, Paris, etc.) are quick and cheap. We are starting a maker space here right now: http://cave.pratyeka.org/

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I am a big fan of Maker Faire. I am glad to see that you have done a good job securing the a nice spot in Kunming and converting it to maker space. I bet you probaly have no competitors over there!

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wow that sounds really nice! Is it very hard to integrate as a foreigner? Maybe next year I will come for a visit! :)

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You are welcome to email... address in profile.

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Thank you for reading. If you have a solid tech background, you will not have any problem relocating there. This was my second time. My first time was in 2005 and I relocated to Shanghai.

As far as dev salary is concerned, most expats get better packages, especially if you've a hard-to-find skill set.

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I believe it's because this people haven't actually experienced the "real world". They might try to persuade some people in following some political correctness or whatever, but the world itself wont care.

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That's a personal opinion and I fully respect it. But I would like to share mine too, which is pretty opposite to yours. I worked for 3 companies as a dev in about 6 years of experience, I always left because I wanted to move to something "more", not because I didn't care or didn't feel included. In all 3 I had a seemingly open space and I really like it if I have space to breath.

I don't think it's about not caring or mattering, actually, the open space environment originated to fight that feeling of being nobody, alone in your cubicle. What open space is trying to achieve is showing that everyone is, at least theoretically, on the same level.

Ultimately, I like it, but I don't think it's perfect and it will probably change. The thing to remember is that this whole big companies are a relatively new thing and nobody has the perfect formula yet, people/companies are experimenting and doing an effort to improve working conditions. I think that matters and I look forward to the future. We are iterating and as long as we don't start to regress I can do nothing but be happy.

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Oh, it's absolutely a personal opinion. Everyone will react differently, and I truly hope that the folks that work there feel that it benefits and fuels them.

I totally get the idea behind open workspaces, and while there are positives to them - they definitely do encourage collaboration and more frequent interaction - I'm massively less productive in them. My issue isn't so much the lack of walls, but the complete abolition of any sense of ownership of a space. Not having a space that feels like my space makes it more difficult for me to get "into the zone", just because I'm less comfortable. Drive-by conversations can utterly murder a good half-hour debugging session. The temptation to get distracted by all the things going on around me noticeably cuts into my motivation and ability to buckle down and tear into the really hard problems.

I realize that this is just my personal reaction to spaces like this, and I'm certainly not authoritative on it, but I have absolutely observed that I'm far happier and more productive in a space that I can both feel a sense of ownership of and use strategically to limit interruptions and distractions.

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I use it on all 3 platforms, works great on all of them.

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OP's one looks cool. But this one is a lot easier to understand.

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seems interesting but I started clicking around, specifically in the Python section and this website seems to have been released too early, the text I am not sure is right(it says I need to use a ruby engine settings for python?) and some links don't work or give 404.

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Yeah, if anyone from nanobox is reading, I found a broken link on the Node.js Engine page:

On page https://engines.nanobox.io/languages/nodejs the link for Create Custom Engine leads to a 404 on https://nanobox.io/engine-dev

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We will get that fixed asap. Thanks for letting us know

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Later it says you can specify which JS runtime to use with python:

  build:
    runtime: python27
    js_runtime: nodejs-0.12
    app_module: ''

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The js_runtime is included because of the ubiquity of using tools like bower and gulp to compile assets, which require node.

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That one's not unreasonable.

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It seems I can't also specify a ruby runtime, though. What makes one reasonable and another not?

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The mention of ruby in the description is a typo. There isn't a ruby runtime available in the generic python engine, but you're free to fork the engine and add the ruby runtime. All engines are open-source.

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Thanks for the heads up! Please keep in mind this is an open-source project in the pre-beta phase. Any contributions are welcomed!

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Well, apparently for them it's way easier to aquire people than space, I mean, in the last quarter they hired 350 people, and since 1st November 75. That's like 3 people a day? Sounds crazy to me! With such a hire rate the quality must be going down at least a bit, and I can't even imagine what the on-boarding must look like, they just point at a desk(or a corner of one) and leave you at your own devices...

I might be wrong... but I would be surprised if I am very far from the truth.

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I use pretty much all 3 main platforms as daily dev enviroment. Mint for work, Windows for hobby and OSX for when I work outside my house. And I find that they are all pretty equal as dev experience(outside of VS, which I avoid because it locks me too much on windows). What would you classify as a better dev experience on Fedora than on windows? I think it might come down to just being used to it or personal preference. They all have strong/weak points but mostly I can get a productive experience on all of them.

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Cannot speak for OP, but the thing, that makes Fedora better developer experience than Windows is dnf (yum) and especially -devel packages.

Windows or MSVC does not really have a standardized way how to cope with third-party SDKs. It is basically unzip the libs and includes somewhere and configure that path that in your project (good luck making other people build your solution). It kind of works with shallow dependencies, but not when your dependencies form a nice graph.

In Fedora, these things work out of the box and you don't have to waste your time.

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Absolutely. Being able to install a -devel package and just get on with things is incredibly important.

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