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> building a strong culture and brand

It's important to focus on building a positive culture and brand.

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dsl 6 hours ago | link | parent | on: Telehash

The Telehash developers are now working on Layer.com

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oscargrouch 5 hours ago | link

look that this is going into another direction..

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dsl 1 day ago | link | parent | on: Our Path Forward

In major metros it is really hard to get roof rights. In larger buildings HOAs even have exclusive agreements with cable and satellite resellers that install a single set of equipment for the entire building.

You are trading one set of ridiculous laws for another.

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paul9290 1 day ago | link

The solution above would suit my needs and work for where I live.

It most likely wouldn't be able to scale to cable company levels, but it would be a great small to mid-size local business. One that could be replicated in cities across the nation.

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upofadown 1 day ago | link

Supposedly those exclusive deals are no longer allowed:

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2009/05/federal-court-uph...

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.me is operated by Afilias, a US corporation.

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dublinben 4 days ago | link

Afilias is an Irish corporation, not a US one.

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dsl 8 days ago | link | parent | on: Xkeyscorerules100.txt

FVEY is the accepted shorthand for AUSCANNZUKUS classification, and has been used since the 50's when UKUSA was expanded.

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The beginning of the article mentions using off the shelf parts, with terrible results. I'm sure if it was that easy and they got decent results from it, they would not have expended so many resources custom building stuff.

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If we used a blockchain based DNS system, we would never have this problem in the first place because we would be unable to take down malicious domains.

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danyork 9 days ago | link

But is that a good thing? Being "unable to take down malicious domains"? I don't know. There is a part of me that wants to protect against this ability to take down domains - and another part of me that says if there were domains spewing malware and facilitating botnets I'd like to see them taken down somehow.

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itistoday2 9 days ago | link

That is a good thing. No need to take down a malicious domain name, just like malware, add it to a blacklist (Google's Chrome already does this).

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sp332 9 days ago | link

The whole point of DNS is that we don't have to pass lists of domain names around, like we did before DNS.

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itistoday2 9 days ago | link

Erm, one is a lookup table for arbitrary (and unknown) names, the other is a blacklist. These are two very different things (the latter is perfectly practical and manageable).

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sp332 9 days ago | link

But why wouldn't a blacklist of people trying to game the system be unmanageably huge?

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AnthonyMouse 9 days ago | link

> But why wouldn't a blacklist of people trying to game the system be unmanageably huge?

First, you don't have to leave every entry on the list until the end of time. At some point (possibly as a result of the domain being on the blacklist) the attacker is going to discontinue using it and it could then be removed. Second, you don't have to store the blacklist on every client device.

You could even just integrate it with the DNS. If you want to know if foo.com is on the blacklist, you do a lookup for foo.com.blacklist.google.com and if that resolves then it's blacklisted. If you don't trust Google to maintain the blacklist then you change a setting and your computer looks up foo.com.blacklist.microsoft.com or foo.com.blacklist.spamhaus.org or whatever else instead.

The point is to decentralize the decision of who maintains the blacklist, so that users can stop using a blacklist if its maintainer makes unpopular decisions.

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DavidJRobertson 9 days ago | link

Perfect use case for a Bloom filter.

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itistoday2 9 days ago | link

It could be "unmanageably huge" for clients, just like the blockchain itself is unmanageably huge for clients. This is the reason DNSChain is designed the way it is (having a personal, dedicated server to store the blockchain for "groups of friends"), thus allowing many client devices to send it arbitrary queries.

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jdong 9 days ago | link

No need for a blacklist either, I don't believe there's been a single example of a malware using a purely DNS based C&C (e.g by utilizing TXT records) instead of using DNS to get the IP address for the C&C server.

Of course there's always an exception, in this case there exists DNS beacons included in pentesting suite Cobalt Strike, but that doesn't seem to be something widely used.

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No-ip was complicit in the illegal activity.

If you use a car wash that is also laundering money, your legitimate need for a clean car is not a defense against shutting the business down.

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Omniusaspirer 11 days ago | link

But that's an awful analogy and frankly you should be ashamed for even trying to paint it in that light. NOIP did nothing illegal whatsoever, their only "crime" was that they didn't do enough about malware distribution to keep Microsoft happy- which last I heard wasn't illegal.

To use your car wash analogy, it's more like the car wash unknowingly washed the car of a drug trafficker and then was essentially put out of business the next day for being "complicit in the illegal activity".

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lukeschlather 11 days ago | link

I am uneasy about this situation, but the car wash in question is more like the car painting shop in Grand Theft Auto. Even if painting cars is a legitimate activity, when 75% of your customers are trying to mask illegal activity you should be doing some due diligence to ensure that you're not enabling illegal activity.

I'm not totally okay with what happened here, but I'm confident that it was not a "oops, sorry, we'll ban that botnet" situation. no-ip's primary use case is botnets, and they do have a responsibility to minimize botnet use. They can't claim ignorance given the widespread use.

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BitMastro 10 days ago | link

no-ip primary use case is certainly not botnets. It's used by dsl users to connect to their home network, or to get an easy to remember address for a vps, or maybe while developing something before getting a proper domain.

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Omniusaspirer 10 days ago | link

75% is a HUGE overstatement, No-IP allegedly has ~4 million active accounts. Of those 4 million, 3rd party security firms claimed ~12k of them were involved in the distribution of these two bits of malware, No-IP said the number was more like 2k. If those numbers are correct then you're talking thousandths of a percentile being the reason for this domain seizure.

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regd005 11 days ago | link

So if some number of people use cars for illegal activities should we shut down the gas stations that they use to fuel them?

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So malware authors will be able to operate with impunity? As in all things, the solution is somewhere in the middle.

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Unions historically employed violence (or fear of violence) to prevent scabs because of the close ties to organized crime. Failing that, there is no real way that the union can avoid scabs.

(Edited to clarify. Yes I acknowledge employers can be evil too, I assumed that was obvious.)

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yanowitz 17 days ago | link

Protecting picket lines is a strategy that goes back to the Chartist movement in England. The whole point of a picket line is to shut down production. Many early labor wars involved management hiring private armies that beat up and even shot strikers.

Organized cribs involvement started during McCarthyism in particular (red scares more generally). When socialists (with a rank and file power perspective) were driven out, the vacuum left was filled by mobsters (in some cases).

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ArtB 17 days ago | link

...as did factory owners.

Is there a name for the logical fallacy where one knowingly misrepresents true statements to suggests things that aren't true? (ie that only unions used violence or had criminal ties).

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steve19 17 days ago | link

Yes, 100 years ago factory owners sure did (Ford being a classic example). More recently they have not.

Low level violence is frequently applied by strike workers today. I once worked (white color job) for a shipping company and we had one strike every couple of years, sometimes more than one in a year (stevedore and sailors were both unionized so there would be two separate negotiations, each of which inevitably ended in a week or two week strike).

Try driving through a picket line of stevedores and see what happens to your car. Actually don't, you will regret it. If they think you are a scab, you will be punched.

If a hardcore unionist calls you a scab, be scared. Its the worst insult they know, and its backed by extreme hatred.

As far as organized crime violence goes, I have no experience with that. I always assumed that was Sopranos fiction.

Unionism has done good things, but I don't believe it has a place in a high tech industry. What Uber needs is solid competition so that drivers can simply defect to a competitor.

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smadge 17 days ago | link

> Unionism has done good things, but I don't believe it has a place in a high tech industry.

Since when was driving a car a high tech industry? Every industry uses high tech, but that doesn't mean they should be subjected to Silicon Valley's poor labor practices.

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te_chris 17 days ago | link

Your position is privileged beyond belief. That you don't see that is both amusing and scary.

Uber is not in the tech industry, they're in the taxi industry, driving cars. This us/them elitism is the scourge of the tech industry. Just pray you don't become as expendable as the drivers are.

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graeme 17 days ago | link

I teach the LSAT. This fallacy occurs all the time. It's "incomplete comparison". Giving information about only one half of a comparison, then stating or implying a conclusion based on that inadequate information.

It really, really fools people.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incomplete_comparison

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