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You may want to re-evaluate - this was widely reported last month:

>The State Department is still reportedly trying to block hacker access to its unclassified e-mail system more than three months after the intruders were first detected.

http://www.enterprise-security-today.com/story.xhtml?story_i...

Yes, "unclassified", but, really? Three months? Really??

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Yeah that's definitely in excusable. But what makes me even more curious is the care the author took to explain that it was only the unclassified system. So what about the classified network? SIPR? CENTRIXS? Are we to assume that HRC didn't send/receive any classified email? That just seems odd. So I'm starting to think that a) she did, in fact, have a government email to handle the classified material and b) chose to have her unclassified email off the network for other reasons that remain to be disclosed.

Edit: I suppose there are other options. She could have used a staffer's email to send messages on the classified networks.

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The writer's belief that all racing is counterclockwise turns out to not be correct for horse racing, some auto racing, and even some long-duration foot racing.

http://risaaustralia.blogspot.com/2012/12/why-race-courses-a...

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/1001/why-are-races-...

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For players in the minor leagues, trying to work their way to a spot in the show, the salary numbers are nowhere near as good:

http://www.baseballamerica.com/minors/players-sue-for-better...

While major leaguers’ salaries have increased by more than 2,000 percent since 1976,” the lawsuit says, “minor leaguers’ salaries have, on average, increased only 75 percent since that time.”

That leaves minor league salaries typically ranging from $1,100 a month in short-season leagues to $2,150 a month for Triple-A, figures asserted in the lawsuit and confirmed by two major league front-office officials.

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Note especially that the proposal is for "non-recreational operations" - FAA tends to make a big differentiation between commercial and private (recreational) activities. I read this proposal as being aimed at movie production, utility (pipeline, powerline) inspection, and similar operations.

Another thing about the FAA - once they write rules, they are generally reluctant to change them, so for anyone wanting to comment on the NPRM, sooner is better than later.

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"Hemingway famously said that the best way for a writer to deal with the movie business was to arrange a quick meeting at the California state line: 'You throw them your book, they throw you the money. Then you jump into your car and drive like hell back the way you came.' (quoted in: Hemingway Lives! by Clancy Sigal)

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So now social media is a platform for the continuation of war by other means?[0] This feels like a slippery slope potentially leading to a morass of misinformation and confusion, not only among the putative enemy but for all readers.

[0] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carl_von_Clausewitz

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For most people, trying to find "patient zero" is doomed to be hard and fruitless - like the employees of a medium-sized company trying to figure out who brought a computer virus to work - too many possible vectors and not enough time and exposure information for amateurs to find, follow, and cross-check clues and stay ahead of prejudicial guesswork. For the Ohio outbreak, the professional epidemiologists could track it:

> Fletcher describes it as a "perfect storm:" an unimmunized traveler going to a place with an outbreak and bringing an infectious disease back to an unprotected community.

Going forward, here's an article that points to some ways that states could change their laws, rules, and procedures to get to higher immunization rates:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/01/29...

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http://www.cdc.gov/measles/hcp/ >One dose of MMR vaccine is approximately 93% effective at preventing measles; two doses are approximately 97% effective.

Vaccination does not confer effective immunity in all those vaccinated. If an outbreak hits a school or day care, the 4 day period in which the infection is contagious before any symptoms appear means that most of the kids will be exposed, and any who are not immunized (either not vaccinated, or vaccination was not effective) are at risk.

I view those who choose not to vaccinate children who could be vaccinated as freeloaders, depending on the rest of us to provide group immunity to protect their children. For those for whom it is a personal preference or belief, rather than part of a religious practice, I wish they would choose to accept their share of the risks.

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Thinking that through, we can expect post-collision inspections (by insurance companies or police) to include a dump of the state of the current code(s) in a vehicle as well as any available data from just before a collision - speed profile, braking, signaling, etc. - which might be used in court to argue liability claims.

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I would not be surprised. Insurance investigators already have access to black box performance metrics leading up to accidents (last X seconds of RPM level, brake pedal force, accelerator position, accelerometer readings, seatbelt indicators). Getting software versions, checksums, etc would be trivial.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Event_data_recorder

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_minimis

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