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If you've drunk the pets-vs-cattle koolaid to the point where your instances are all (or mostly) ephermal then you're probably also using auto-scaling groups and don't care if a particular single instance falls over.

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    > If you've drunk the pets-vs-cattle koolaid
Generally drinking the kool-aid is a bad thing - any reason to favour pets?

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I don't know about "brutally quick". Anyone who's driven an M3, S4, or any similar performance sedan isn't going to be blown away by the speed of the Model S. It's fast, but it isn't mind-blowing.

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As someone who's driven both a 2011 M3 GTS and a 2012 Model S Performance around a track, they may be in the same class, and the around same speed on paper, but they feel very different. I'd classify both as brutal, but the Model S accelerates more explosively without seeming like it's even trying. I'm sure the relative silence has a lot to do with it but the car absolutely feels faster. It's difficult to explain, you've got to drive it to understand.

Even if fuel economy, maintenance, reliability, etc. were not factors I would go with the Model S every day of the week.

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> I'm sure the relative silence has a lot to do with it but the car absolutely feels faster. It's difficult to explain, you've got to drive it to understand.

See my earlier post in this thread with a series wound electric motor has infinite torque at stall (not yet rotating). So, standing still or moving slowly, an electric car, with a lot of power, can feel like it has instant, effortless, and amazing acceleration compared with an internal combustion engine that has to use gears and a clutch or torque converter.

> fuel economy, maintenance, reliability,

Yup, a Tesla could have some advantages especially since its engine really has only one moving part, the armature of the electric motor, or two for the D model. That's a long way from the number of parts in an internal combustion engine with camshaft, push rods, rocker arms, valve springs, valves, pistons, connecting rods, ....

But, for a Tesla, there's a chance that in time the battery will need to be replaced.

Long ago a Ford executive said, "You build me a good battery, and I will build you a good electric car.". Apparently Tesla has made a lot of progress on the battery, but it remains an issue, for cost, weight, charging time, and lifetime.

But, no joke, an engine with just one moving part, and no transmission, has one heck of an advantage in maintenance and reliability.

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> But, no joke, an engine with just one moving part, and no transmission, has one heck of an advantage in maintenance and reliability.

I guess you could say the same thing about the Wankel engine as well.

The problem is that a traditional engine is tuned to work well enough within the life time of a car these days, so it isn't really a problem.

Fuel economy wise though, the traditional piston engine outperforms the Wankel engine.

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The Wankel was asking a lot of the seals at the edges of its special rotor; apparently it was asking too much.

> Fuel economy wise though, the traditional piston engine outperforms the Wankel engine.

Yes, piston rings work a lot better than the seals Wankel needs. And, now with pistons, we can use high compression ratios; the Wankel seals have problems which get much worse at higher compression ratios.

Why high compression ratios? Simple, classic Carnot cycle physics: The higher the compression ratio, the more get out of the fuel.

Why higher compression ratios now? Because now we can have direct fuel injection, directly into the combustion chamber, much as in a Diesel. So, then can do all the turbo charging and supercharging want, for still higher total compression ratios because don't have to worry about pre-ignition from the air being too hot from the compression it got before entering the cylinder. So, don't have to use an intercooler to cool the compressed air.

Why supercharging or turbocharging? Because get more power out of the same basic engine of pistons, cylinders, etc., that is, more power without more friction from larger pistons. So save on friction. So two savings for fuel economy: Higher compression ratios and less friction. That's what Volvo and others are doing: Small engine, lots of boost, good power and good fuel economy.

I suspect a good way to get both range and fuel economy with an electric car is to have a hybrid: So, have an internal combustion engine drive a generator to charge the batteries.

Here can have an advantage: The engine need run at only one power setting, its most efficient. Then for such an engine? Sure, use a gas turbine so that we are back to basically just one moving part. Yes, in an axial flow gas turbine, the part that rotates, at, say, 30,000 RPM or so, is darned expensive, but that part is also designed for the engine to have some ability to have a throttle. If give up the idea of a throttle and have only one power setting, then we can return to centrifugal force for both the compressor and the turbine. Then the metal for the high temperatures is expensive, so can use some ceramic.

Now we're talking: Just one major moving part, cheap ceramic, centrifugal force, single power setting (where the aerodynamics for the compressor and turbine work best). Might get 200 HP in a small package. Then run it only when charging the battery.

Then never bother plugging the car to charge the batteries. When driving around town, nearly never run the turbine. On the highway at 65 MPH, occasionally run the turbine. Blasting across, say, Nevada at 110 MPH, run the turbine a lot. At top speed of 150 MPH or so, sure, run the turbine 100% of the time and still have the battery run down.

Sure, get some losses when generate the electric power, when stuff it into the battery, when draw it out of the battery, and when drive the electric motor. Yup, several losses.

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> I suspect a good way to get both range and fuel economy with an electric car is to have a hybrid: So, have an internal combustion engine drive a generator to charge the batteries.

Isn't that how the Chevy Volt/Opel Ampera is operating?

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I suspect so, and for some other hybrids as well, but I don't think anyone is using a gas turbine yet except maybe in a hybrid for, say, a city bus.

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Agreed, 0-60 in 5 seconds isn't slow, but it's not brutally fast by any stretch of the imagination.

I'm less interested in the speed and more interested in the handling. I am a BMW guy through and through because they are just so much fun to drive and just feel right. How would you compare taking a Model S through the twisties to say an M3 or even a regular 3 series?

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Model S is a heavy car - with something over 2 tonnes, it is in weight category of 7er.

3er/M3 are different league in handling. Those extra 700 kg you simply cannot hide.

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it's 3 seconds, not 5.

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That's the P version rated at 700hp or so, not the one reviewed. But I would absolute rate 0-60 in 3 seconds as brutally fast. That's Porsche and Ferrari territory.

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No, the review was the non-P version which is the slower model.

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Well, there's always the Tesla P85D, which they briefly mention in the article. That's the real performance version. It's quite a bit faster at 0-60 mph than the M3, roughly 3.2 seconds vs 3.9 seconds.

And the Tesla is quiet. Here's a great video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QERGldfZA5A

I don't know how well a Tesla corners compared to German or Italian competition.

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It feels pretty great in corners because the suspension keeps the car level. I don't have experience driving many other higher end cars to compare it to, though.

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It will never hold up on the track. The battery can only handle the max load for a short amount of time, before the computer limits the engine and make the car more of a sunday driver. That's not a problem for every day driving, it just isn't comparable to other supercars on the track. It however means that for normal usage, it means you have the efficiency of an EV and the "burst" ability of a supercar.

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Cornering on the P85D is pretty amazing due to the low centre of mass. I got to drive it on public roads rather than the track, so I didn't get to push too hard, but even then I was surprised how quickly I could hustle it through bends (for comparison my usual drive is a BMW Z3M Coupe, and I've been lucky enough to drive most of the present M cars on the Spartanburg track).

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In the final solution at the end of the article there are only two pipes:

1. A pipe to feed the file names into xargs for starting up parallel `mawk` processes.

2. A pipe to a final `mawk` process which aggregates the data from the parallel processes.

There's still some performance that could be gained by using a single processes with threads and shared memory, but this is pretty good for something that can be whipped together quickly.

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Yeah its not bad. In the final command, it is basically leveraging mawk for everything which works out well since there's fewer pipes.

But in this case its about replacing hadoop with mawk basically. Which is indeed a good point as well - and incidentally also confirms my own comment =)

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Keep reading, he removes the cat and grep in the final solution.

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Yes, but he still keeps the awkward Awk code with the substr and such. I haven't benchmarked, maybe that's faster than the pretty regex matches.

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I believe this is to be a bit more educative about how to build a pipeline. Also, iteratively building such solutions quickly often leads to such "inefficiencies" but makes things easier to reason with. Besides, the awk step may have been factored out in the end so it wouldn't make sense to optimise early. Also, by the time the author reaches the end, he gets IO-bound so there's not much need to optimise further (in the context of the exercise).

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My wife has an N4 running 5.0.1 with no issues re calling, so if there is an issue for these users it's an isolated one and not a systemic problem with all N4s.

Most of the Android phones on the page you linked are not Google phones. Whether or not they get updated is up to the manufacturers and carriers, not Google. You'll note that the Nexus phones have more update support in general.

Whether providing major updates to a phone is a good thing is debatable. My wife hated getting the 5.0 update. She saw it as a major inconvience that changed how her phone worked for no good reason. She would prefer to have the phone work the same way for the entire time she owns it.

PS: 'Sup, fury?

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> My wife has an N4 running 5.0.1 with no issues re calling, so if there is an issue for these users it's an isolated one and not a systemic problem with all N4s.

That's a bit of a leap to declare that the issue is an isolated one because your wife is not having the problem. As it turns out, my wife had that exact problem with her Nexus 4 on 5.0.1.

How widespread is the problem? Who knows. From my perspective it seems like the 5.0 release has been a bit more problematic than previous major Android upgrades.

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If there is one device which is not impacted then it is not a problem with all devices. The problem is therefore isolated to a subset of all devices. Perhaps that subset is the majority of all N4s, perhaps it is a small fraction. We don't have enough data to say one way or another.

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Ahh, the ol' "works for me". Just because it works for your wife doesn't deem it as a non-problem, as seen by the hundreds of comments on a single bug report in the span of just a couple days.

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I didn't say it's a non-problem. I said it's not a problem with all Nexus 4 devices.

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That intro was responsible for introducing me to Orbital as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbital_(band)

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Google's tool is new to me as well, but it doesn't seem to be very good for comparing card rewards programs. I like the nerdwallet site for that: http://www.nerdwallet.com/

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Triangle is back, circle is home, square is list/switch apps. They're in the same places and have the same functionality as Android 4.x.

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No Nexus 6?

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Added it!

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Nope your still missing the 64GB Variation.. You only show apple and oneplus at 64GB memory..

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I added the Nexus 6 with 64 GB 5 minutes before your message. Either you tried before, or it's a cache issue. Try reloading real hard!

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The AWS status page not showing anything isn't unusual. They'll probably update in half an hour to describe it as a partial failure then revise it to an "all OK" 10 minutes before it's actually fixed then retroactively downgrade it to a minor quality of service disruption.

Not that I've noticed they tend to lie through their teeth on the status page or anything....

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Apparently, "DNS resolution errors" are considered neither a "service disruption" nor a "performance issue", but instead are categorized as an "informational message."

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