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If this is China doing this, it makes me so upset the US has spent years and billions of dollars building up their economy instead of countries like Mexico.

Our relationship with them is almost as bad as our middle-eastern oil addiction.

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Aren't 150 innocent civilians dying everyday in Syria from a mentally ill dictator? That's a 9/11 every month.

Where are the hours of news coverage for that every day?

Also 30,000 people have died in Iraq since the "war" supposedly ended in 2011 and the US "left". That is a few 9/11's every year for them.

By the way, every single middle-eastern country, every one of them, is currently at war, either civil-war or externally against another country or against groups like ISIS. Shouldn't thousands of hours of news time be devoted to that, like every opening paragraph on TV and in print should be - "the ENTIRE middle-east is currently at war". It is kind of important.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whataboutism

By that criterion, we shouldn't talk about a murder in our neighborhood, about our children failing at maths, about unemployment... War is worse than all these.

Also, it's not news when every headline every day is "more 150 people dead in war". You think people would keep watching the news, let alone caring about some war far, far away?

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BBC seems to be able to cover it almost daily. American "news" virtually never unless there is a talking point some politician is pushing.

American "news" seems to find a reason to talk every hour about the plane mass-murder, many times just saying "we have nothing new to tell you" even the reporters they turn to simply repeat in different words what the anchor JUST SAID.

So why not cover all the countries currently at war in the middle east every hour. They most definitely have news every hour on that one because more people have died. No more people are going to die in that single plane crash despite hundreds of hours of coverage.

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The American news I follow covers these things. Maybe you need better sources of news.

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Whataboutism - revealing explanation! Nowadays you need to be aware of all the rhetoric tricks or you get fooled.

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While I eagerly look forward to PHP7, you can get more than PHP7 speed now with HHVM, and HHVM has never been easier to use.

But competition is good, great actually. HHVM recently folded in JIT regex like PHP7, so they are copying from each other.

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Hack is also a substantially better language than PHP.

It, directly or indirectly, fixes a lot of horrible behaviour. PHP's absurd comparison operators, for instance, are safely usable once you drop them into a statically typed environment.

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Hack is merely PHP with poorly-enforced type hints

Unlike PHP, Hack lets you, nay, encourages you, to turn off type checking in places

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I don't believe it's just that. One of the coolest features which if it is used properly actually speeds up the response times of a normal blocking php script /app flow is the as async feature: http://docs.hhvm.com/manual/en/hack.async.php.

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If you are buying things with debit/credit cards the banks that issue those cards are already selling your data without your knowledge.

It is opt-out only and you have to do it in writing, there is no online hassle-free way to do it, which is on purpose. There is also no way to confirm they really stopped selling your data.

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Is this an American thing? Because I've never had my bank, my provider, my health care etc sell any of my data (at least as far as I know).

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It is a German thing as well: The Telekom sells mobile user data [1] (link in German).

[1] http://www.spiegel.de/netzwelt/netzpolitik/datenschutz-vag-i...

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How would you know?

Do you have a credit card, and have you read the pages of fine print?

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Maybe (s)he has decent data protection laws in his/her country. I'm pretty sure this would be illegal in the EU, under the Directive 95/46/EC.

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That is adorable.

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Thanks, darling.

To make myself clear, I'm not saying they don't do it. I'm saying it's probably illegal, therefore the fine print doesn't matter.

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I can't wait for Bitcoin like technologies to be ubiquitous.

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I understand that some countries allow small purchases to be made with special bitcoins made out of atoms and backed by fiat currency. I’m told that in those countries, their atom coins are ubiquitous, and, there is technology that allows mobile payments.

For example, you can purchase foodstuffs from vending machines using atom coins. The mind boggles.

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And unlike bitcoins, the atom coins aren't traceable!

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However, the wallet technology is extremely insecure.

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My wallet could get stolen, with a fraction of my money in it. Seems more likely that bitcoins will get stolen at some point, and all your money is just gone.

Tip: Carry your atom-wallet in your front pocket. Pickpockets have a hard time with front pockets.

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This weird technology has been used for some time though, so users have already internalized good practices wrt. secure mattercoin handling.

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Well considering the BitCoin hype has died down...that seems unlikely.

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Careful what you wish for. Instead of one big target bill with a set of laws allowing unconstitutional activity by the government, they will replace it with a ton of tiny laws buried in other bills that are impossible to target as a group.

Actually now that I think about it, Congress barely passes any bills anyway anymore so that would be tricky for them, but since many of them are there for decades, they have plenty of time.

Term limits really would make sense.

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> Term limits really would make sense.

Term limits empower the influential actors that aren't directly accountable (lobbyists, professional staff, etc.) because the people that are directly accountable don't have the experience (unless gained through those other avenues) to be effective, and don't have a future in the institution (except as influencers in those other avenues). They don't actually address the problems you point too.

Lots of state governments have legislative term limits, and many times have much more of the same kind of problem you seem concerned about.

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> Term limits really would make sense.

Three terms in the House, two in the Senate. Eighteen years is more than enough time for anyone to hold that much power.

A nice side effect would be more people working hard at the state level rather than seeing the state legislature as just a stepping stone to national office.

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Two terms in the Senate is 12 years, two in the house is 4.

So I don't know where you got 18 from!

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Assuming one person would hit both term limits: 2 6-year terms in the Senate plus 3 2-year terms in the house would be 18.

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I saw two and two. My mistake.

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Does Tesla do free firmware upgrades for all owners, regardless if they are the second, etc. owner?

Because that is another thing that will crush dealers. Gas car manufacturers will not update ECU software unless the car is either in warranty or its an actual recall.

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To my limited knowledge most (maybe all) of the software in Tesla model S can be updated over the air, using cars cellular internet connection.

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That's correct. It's possible for a service center to load software over a wire, but that's only necessary when something goes wrong. In the normal course of events, the car pops up a little alert saying there's a software update available, and asking when you want to install it. Updates are free forever (although one expects that updates for older hardware will stop being made eventually). It's basically like an iPhone in this regard.

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That's not uniformly true. Mini dealers would upgrade firmware for cars out of warranty.

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Yep, ownership doesn't matter.

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Gosh I miss heathkit. I could never afford anything there but it was a fun store to browse and the catalog was amazing.

Learned to solder on their AM radio kit (cheapest kit they had).

Soon we'll miss Radio Shack and there will be nothing left but internet orders.

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Really nice all in one guide (of course they are trying to sell you stuff but it is still a really good guide).

There are five parts which you might not notice on the left.

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Stop supporting the SSL cartel.

Just use StartSSL.

Free or $60 for two years if you need subdomain wildcards.

http://www.startssl.com/?app=40

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NB: On p. 12, section 3.1.2.1, the policy [1] states:

Class 1 certificates are limited to client and server certificates, whereas the later is restricted in its usage for non-commercial purpose only. Subscribers MUST upgrade to Class 2 or higher level for any domain and site of commercial nature, when using high-profile brands and names or if involved in obtaining or relaying sensitive information such as health records, financial details, personal information etc.

[1] http://www.startssl.com/policy.pdf

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And $24.90 if you need a certificate revoked. Very helpful. Not.

Also, isn't there any CA that gives away wildcard certs for free? It's the only reason I'm sticking with CACert...

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Their $140 EV certs do not have revocation fees.

http://www.startssl.com/?app=37

Revocations carry a handling fee, except for Extended Validation SSL Certificates

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StartSSL oddload additional work for your lawyer or accountant so they can skip some EV steps. In turn, you get to pay for their billable hours:

http://www.startssl.com/extended-validation-application-requ...

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Mike from CertSimple here (using old openid account as my other one is replying too fast):

StartSSL don't do EV (edit: they do, just not for $60).

We only do EV, since we actually identifying companies is how SSL should have always been.

$60 is way too much to pay for non-EV, an automated process that doesn't check who you are. If you want a non-EV certificate, wait a couple of months and use https://letsencrypt.org

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StartSSL don't do EV

They say they do. See the page http://www.startssl.com/?app=40

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You're right. Edited.

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Don't use StartSSL, they are shady and often a hassle to deal with. If you don't need EV certs, hope that "let's encrypt" comes of the ground quickly.

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That has not been my experience. What issues did you have?

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$20 chinese clones (from the factory next to the microsoft one) available in August.

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