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This looks really well done. I've used a bunch of different transit apps in SF, and all of them are extremely awkward and hard to use.

I'm very hopeful I can use this app to replace nextmuni.com, which has always been slow and buggy for me.

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Thanks for giving Rover a shot! Let me know if you have any feedback.

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If that were true why aren't their uproars over any of these projects:

https://github.com/grosser/pru https://github.com/colinta/ned https://github.com/aljungberg/pyle https://github.com/zzak/gsub https://github.com/bjfletcher/node-js-sed

I'm sure there are more. These are just a few I could find a few minutes.

Sorry, I'm not trying to call you out here. I just have serious doubts that the criticism has anything to do with merit. In other words, I don't think it makes sense to rationalize jerky behavior :(

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I dunno, did the other projects get tweeted and hit the right combination of followers? Why does anything get attention/go viral?

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It's a fair question. I'm honestly confused about why this blew up in the first place.

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I have my doubts the folks criticizing it actually read the code. Even if they have, what's the point of shitting on someone's pet project? Note that none of them actually give a reason for why the think it's bad. I think the folks criticizing are simply being bullies.

I think the code is fine and the project serves a nice niche. I can never remember the syntax for sed either, so I might actually use this project. No such thing as bad press I guess :)

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Yes, that was my exact experience with Hibernate. I spent two years working on apps that used Hibernate and I never felt like I really understood how it worked. ActiveRecord for the most part "Just Works" for me in comparison.

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Author is definitely a winner. He founded Bleacher Report. Disclaimer: I work there.

It's fine to disagree, but it's a pretty lame attack him based on a selected portion of his bio.

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> "It's fine to disagree, but it's a pretty lame attack him based on a selected portion of his bio."

As opposed to attacking an entire blanket group of people based on their ability to answer personal questions in an interview?

tokenadult didn't start by calling people "losers".

It's lame when know-it-alls write blog posts about how their unscientific, unverified approach to some task ought to be adopted by everyone. It's even more lame when successful people ascribe their successes to such unscientific hoo-hah (even though we all have them), proceed to spoon feed them to everyone within eye-shot, and point at people and call them losers on arbitrary criteria.

The world is full of successful jerks - the jury is still out on whether your boss ever really had an effective hiring system.

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That is what the author is espousing - judging people on a selected part of their bio, while disregarding any success they've had in the actual work they do.

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This whole trend of categorizing people as "winners" or "losers" seems distasteful. What is winning? Favorable circumstances in the present?

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I have to admit, I'm surprised at how polarizing the words "winners" and "losers" are to people in this thread.

Replace the word winner with successful, and does it seem so bad?

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Sure, we could replace winners and losers with some term like "A players" and "B players." But even judging past success has its flaws; I feel that society as a whole tends to put success, or "winning", on a pedestal. How many great minds have we benefited from who had significant flaws in their time, or went unrecognized?

People are probably a lot more complicated than we think. We try to sort them out into categories as best we can, but we should remember that our understanding of another person's value is limited at best. Calling out people as "losers" because they don't fit your purpose is immature.

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"Success" is a continuum. "Winners/losers" is binary.

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Winner and Loser have personal traits attached to them. Loser almost implies that the individual had some problems personally and not in the way he executed the task.

Success and Failure imply that the individual did task X, Y , Z to achieve a result S or not achieve result S. It has more to do with an individuals execution at the instance.

Loser almost implies that the person is doomed and some how naturally incapable.

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But it's a pretty lame attack him based on a selected portion of his bio.

This comment is like 10,000 spoons, when all you need is one spoon.

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The lyric is actually "when all you need is a knife" --- but that might have been intentional on your part, Thomas?

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I like to strike my little blow against how little irony is actually in that song.

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Your comment is making me feel like a loser :P

Can you explain what you mean?

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It's like rain, on your wedding day.

A free ride, when you've already paid.

Some good advice that you just didn't take.

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I don't get it.

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They're lyrics from an Alanis Morisette song, "Ironic."

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Do you happen to know if the author went to college?

He seems to have this cute idea that you pay $120k to a institution of higher learning, then you dedicate all of your time to academics, then you emerge with a well-refined body of knowledge in your particular field. I thought this is how it worked too, before I attended a college.

Maybe his point is that you shouldn't be taken seriously if you pay $120k and spend 4 years doing something where you're not deeply intellectually invested, but it's hard to have the confidence at 17 to be the contrarian that doesn't attend college.

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Author went to college.

Look at his questions from another angle. Would you hire a CS grad who couldn't answer the question "What's your favorite programming language?"

I think his example might be overly specific, but the answers the candidate gave would certainly be a red flag.

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Yes. But then, we use a gamified version of a work-sample test, so I would know that despite the fact that the candidate doesn't really care about the difference between Python and Ruby, he can exploit blind SQL injection and reverse engineer a network protocol. Which is good, because the latter ability is predictive of success, and the former is predictive of lots of stupid unproductive arguments.

This would be a nitpicking debate except that it gets to the heart of what makes the interview strategy in this article so dumb. There are lots of great programmers --- maybe some of the best --- who don't care all that much about language design or what language they'll be working in. There are, more importantly, a WHOLE MESS of programmers who can DEFINITELY talk your ears off about what the best language is... and then fail fizbuzz.

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I wouldn't be interested in someone who has a "favourite programming language."

That's just asking for someone who thinks they're clever for figuring out how to drive screws with a hammer.

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It depends if I'm hiring him to program or repair cars. If someone left college with a CS degree and a realization that he never wanted to write a line code ever again and got an apprenticeship as a welder instead, I wouldn't hold it against him if 6 years later he'd forgotten most of what he knew about programming.

So this candidate partied his way through college and bluffed his way to a degree, what difference does that make if you're not hiring him to do anything related to his degree? I thought the prevailing notion here was that most of the stuff taught at college was largely pointless when compared to the hard-won knowledge gained in the trenches of the professional world.

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I would rather hire a CS grad who couldn't answer the question, "What's your favorite programming language?" than someone who could. A decent CS grad wouldn't have a preference, there are different languages for different purposes depending on what you are trying to accomplish. There is no one language fits all language. I'd prefer a CS grad who has a vested interest and appreciation of multiple languages, wouldn't you? Why hire someone with a raging hard on for Java when you can hire someone with an appreciation for Java, Python and C++?

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I don't really know what my favorite programming language is, i'm currently most efficient in perl and java, but that doesn't mean that they're my favorites. I've not found "the language" yet.

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I can't.

I'm always trying to choose between C++ and Lisp.

Disclaimer: I don't know Haskell or any other pure FP languages.

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Selection of bio? The commenter above just wrote a small novel about why he's wrong. Talk about selective reading.

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Ignoring that he has built a successful company (while needing to hire a ton of people to accomplish it) seems very selective to me.

Also saying that "Maybe he'll be a winner in the future, and I wish him well" makes me think he completely missed that, or perhaps has never heard of Bleacher Report. The intersection of tech people and sports people does not seem very large.

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But doesn't he act on a select portion of this hapless applicant's bio?

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There's a fine line between correction and pedantry.

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Indeed, and we don't need an extra 30+ posts in each thread that don't add to the discussion but simply point spelling/grammar errors.

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Look at the ruby libraries for syslog. Iirc, there is a ruby standard library for syslog.

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If you are currently at roughly 0 active users, I would not worry about how much 500k active users cost.

That said, I think something about your cost estimate is way off. It should not cost $75k/mo to host 500k active users. My guess is that either:

  1) Your use case analysis is on the high side
  2) You are using parse incorrectly 
  3) Parse is a bad fit for your application
You can rent 100s of servers from aws for $75k/mo. That should be way overkill to handle 500k active users.

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What's wrong with the metaphor? How would you have described the problem differently?

I thought it was a really good description of the situation Facebook is in. People have speculated for years about all of the different ways they could produce insane revenue/profits (the hot dog -> caviar machine), but their current revenue (the hot dogs) is very lackluster.

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I think the issue is that metaphors work best when they are about real situations. The idea of a metaphor (usually) is to help a person understand one situation by mapping their knowledge of another, more familiar, situation to the first. No one is familiar with the problem of turning hot dogs into caviar, because no one is trying to do it. If anything, the actual problem is more familiar to those on HN than the metaphor.

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In practice it is very difficult to sell shares of a private company.

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