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these are venture funded companies that haven't gone public.. the readers of wsj are brokers that might take them public, investors that might invest pre-ipo, vcs, pension fund managers that might be investing in vc funds, private equity guys looking to acquire companies.

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> the readers of wsj are brokers that might take them public, investors that might invest pre-ipo, vcs, pension fund managers that might be investing in vc funds, private equity guys looking to acquire companies.

There are 300k brokers in the US. [1] WSJ has 2.5 million daily subscribers. [2]

[1] http://www.bls.gov/ooh/sales/securities-commodities-and-fina... [2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wall_Street_Journal

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Sorry but by that logic, Dell became a startup comapny after being a public company :)

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elon recently tweeted a video of people experiencing P85D "Insane Mode" acceleration for the first time

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qFV5i8tBhs&app=desktop

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I love how it glued that little girl's phone to the seat. That much acceleration is just insane; I guess that's why they call it that, huh?

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This strikes me as quite a dangerous feature. Cars accelerating slowly is a great safety feature. Maybe they could relabel this feature the "Suge Knight" feature since it will make parking lots and other areas of surging cars a whole new theatre.

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It's around as dangerous as any other performance car with an extremely powerful engine. You can still drive slowly; the difference is in what happens when you floor the pedal.

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That video was hilarious, thanks!

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Reminds me of recent post on HN about amp. it's like a hearing aid for your phone.

https://medium.com/@Amp/cant-you-just-turn-up-the-volume-4ec...

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Summary: Germany is opening up A9 Autobahn for testing self driving cars. Previously, German companies couldn't test on the public roads due to regulations. German car companies don't want to depend on Google for autonomous driving technology.

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In 1991, I worked for Daimler (Mercedes) in their Advanced Vehicle Research group. We had an abandoned section of Autobahn a few miles outside Stuttgart available for our use, but we also had authorization to test on public highways in autonomous mode. We just had to have a driver seated and paying attention, and had a red panic button on the center console. Pushing the panic button reverted the vehicle control to fully manual. (This was in a large bus-like vehicle, based on the Vario platform, a little larger than a current Sprinter.)

http://www.autoevolution.com/news/a-short-history-of-mercede... is an image of the actual vehicle I worked on.

So, while we couldn't test in no-humans onboard mode, we logged hundred of miles in fully autonomous mode.

Technical notes: the programming language was Occam. I'd have to look through my notes to see what the network size was, but the vision system alone (my main focus, no pun intended) was in the low double figures of processors, with most of those being dedicated to variance calculations to find prominent horizontal edges. I seem to recall we processed the video stream at 15 frames per second by the time I left.

Best. Internship. Ever...

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It's increasingly obvious to me that in the future we won't have flying cars. Transportation will be below ground and the people will take back the streets.

Examples of this trend include: boston big dig, atlanta beltway.

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This trend is quite old if you think about other means of transportation like the train:

- London Underground: 1863

- Paris Métro : 1900

But you're right about cars tunnels, the infamous Seattle project can also be mentioned http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaskan_Way_Viaduct_replacement...

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Rather than checking out..... consider spending time trying to get mentored by the new managers. Think of the way Larry Page was mentored by Eric Schmidt. Also spend time reading about how to manage a large team.

Also consider... do you want to manage a large team? Or do it again from the ground up?

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When they were hiring all these people... how did you react? did you express interest in these roles?

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I agree. In the old days there were tons of crap time tracker apps. I suspect that as they didn't make much money and as they had to pay the yearly fee, the dev shut them down. Now there are only about a dozen fairly good apps.

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I have a similar app, onsite time tracker, and it makes way less. like a few hundred dollars per month.

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/onsite-time-tracker/id470803...

I have always been curious how much Hours Tracker makes. It dominates the app store searches.

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The article says free with IAP is making much more revenue. You'd probably be wise to try that with yours.

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yeh i agree. will probably make the change soon.

one struggle i had was what to make free and what to charge for. i thought about making the app free and charge only to export data, but i felt like people might feel duped by not realizing and then be forced to pay when they thought it was free. the plan with limiting the # of entries makes way more sense.

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When I'm considering tweaks to IAP strategy, any ideas that entrap the user's data are non-starters. The user owns that data, they should always be able to get out what they put in.

Supertop's Unread also has a great (similar) take on IAP: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/unread-rss-news-reader/id911...

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A lot of people agree. It's called division of labor.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_of_labour

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