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I wonder, is 2 premature babies in one year in a 5,000 person company very unusual? Did their actuaries just do a horrible job? Or is that really a truly extraordinary event for a company their size?

Reminds me of when I balked at my home insurance company trying to bump my rates 20% one year- they said it was because of the 2011 Japan earthquake (I'm in Canada). I laughed and walked right out.

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You're presuming their decision to self insure was based on an actuarial assessment.

From my experience, it's also plausible that some poor schlep in the accounting department was tasked with looking into self insuring, and created a not-very-robust risk model. At AOL's size one would hope an actuary was involved, but that may not be the case.

As well, even if am actuary was involved, that doesn't stop upper management getting peeved when payouts are towards the upper bound of the model, as all they likely saw was the potential cost savings of the lower bound of the model, not the full risk.

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The demo reported 192.168.56.1 as a local IP. Now they know I have VirtualBox installed. I wonder what other IPs can leak information about common apps and network configs.

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No. Your public IP has always been available to a Javascript developer who knows enough to write a one-line PHP script that prints $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] (as an example). This just makes it available via another protocol.

The new bit is that you can now get local IPs. But that doesn't help someone trying to figure out if you're using a VPN.

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> Your public IP has always been available to a Javascript developer who knows enough to write a one-line PHP script that prints $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] (as an example).

The demo shows both my USA VPN IP address and my China Telecom IP address under "public addresses" (I strongly doubt this was possible before WebRTC). This means that Hulu, YouTube, Netflix etc. can now start blocking me even when I'm behind a VPN.

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> Sailors and scientists needed to know the range and lethality of underwater nuclear explosions. Would they harm the crews, ships and planes delivering the weapons?

This reminded me of the Mark 45 nuclear torpedo exhibit at the USS Bowfin mueseum at Pearl Harbor. The targeting procedure was for the torpedo to be "aimed in the general direction and to the far side of the target, in order to place as much distance as possible between the submarine and the nuclear explosion." Yikes. See http://svsm.org/gallery/mk45/IMGP6756

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Yikes indeed. I have to wonder if the sailors aboard the victory ships closest to the blast in the linked article knew the level of danger they were in. Absolutely terrifying.

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TCP reorders segments just fine but it treats disordering as a congestion signal and slows down. That's why link aggregation frequently uses the technique of pinning flows to a single link- to minimize disordering so as to avoid triggering TCP congestion control.

In Linux, you can change the sensitivity to disordering by writing to /proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_reordering.

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Chilliwack, BC, Canada

We sell a multi-connection VPN between customer premises and datacenter, managed by a behind-the-firewall web application. Our office overlooks the farms and mountains in Chilliwack, British Columbia. You’re far enough from Vancouver to avoid the congestion, but close enough to attend industry events.

We need a software developer who can handle the whole stack. You use BSD sockets in the morning and WebSockets after lunch. Your toolbox includes gdb, jsPerf.com, and everything in between. You’re at home with Less- both the pager and the stylesheet language. Your colleagues love you because your software is clear, cohesive, and unit tested, and your users adore you because your UIs are tested and proven effective. You know the meaning of CAP_NET_ADMIN and CSRF. Your apps run on a 10 year old machine with 256 MB of memory, then scale up to a 32 GB server built yesterday. We don’t care if you know our stack, because you learn quickly (and our training program doesn't hurt, either).

E-mail me at matt.fox@multapplied.net.

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"The sequel to 23.975 frames per second we've all been waiting for. 480 minutes (690,508.8 frames!) of pure bliss. I laughed, I cried, I saw exactly 23.976 frames per second."

171 out of 171 members found this review helpful

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The subway speeding past photo is interesting- the door is clearly slanted to one side. Is this an artifact of the camera scanning line-by-line relatively slowly? Or something else?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_shutter

Common on certain types of digital cameras today as well (especially smaller ones like mobile phones and P&S cameras).

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> Is this an artifact of the camera scanning line-by-line relatively slowly?

Yes!

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I've seen the GPL accompanying a TP-Link wifi device, with a link to http://www.tp-link.com/en/support/gpl/.

This seems to be Pioneer's GPL source code site: http://www.oss-pioneer.com/car/navi/files/ . I don't see AVIC-5000NEX there, but a variety of other AVIC devices are listed.

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Most of those links just lead to a zipped version of the 7-zip source code. There's some kind of browser as well. Nothing you can't get elsewhere.

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That reminds me of something I heard once- "there are old pilots, and there are bold pilots, but there are no old bold pilots."

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And then, there's Jurgis Kairys[1] doing things like this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWaSgofuD6g at 60.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jurgis_Kairys

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