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One of my favorite things about this launch is that both Docker and AeroFS were in the same YC batch, so doing this was extra special for us.

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CoreOS is S'13. One big happy family.

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AeroFS, Palo Alto, CA careers@aerofs.com https://www.aerofs.com/careers

We're hiring for software engineers across pretty every single part of the stack you can imagine.

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'every single part of the stack' - with 6 positions listed....

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You could possibly simplify this into two tips:

- Be concise

- Don't bury the lede

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Thanks Yuri. If there's one piece of advice to give, it's that.

What I'm attempting to get at in this piece is a bit more tactical. The applications I reviewed all knew they should "be concise." But, they kept running into situations where they became more verbose while believing they were still concise.

My hope was to point out a few of the mental traps that would add clauses to sentences and sentences to paragraphs.

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Great tl;dr summary. The example of the robot that drinks beer was a pretty good illustration of how much better being concise it, though.

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It's actually one tip: Be concise

irony

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The data ultimately lives upstream on a corporate file server, so long as you install the "AeroFS Team Server" -- which is the backing storage agent. The Team Server is indeed optional, so you could theoretically just run things in a peer-to-peer manner, but really the recommended environment is to have the Team Server up and running.

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I'm sorry you found the language confusing, but it's far from the intent (I've actually fired off an email to the lawyers to see if we can clear it up).

Specifically, when you see language like this used by us or other people, the idea is that someone would not be able to come onto your website and use the content or features of your website for the purpose of driving their own business. The main purpose of this is that any commercial benefit from your website should really belong to you.

They are of course free to come onto the website to learn more about and purchase the products and services, which they are then permitted to use under the applicable product license agreement or terms of service.

Hope that's helpful!

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Thank you for replying so promptly and for taking my concerns into account. When I see language like that used by anyone I stop what I'm doing, unless I'm there for personal reasons. I respect the wishes of other organisations and if they make it seem like they don't want me there, I take it seriously. When people come to me for services, I expect them to take my terms just as seriously.

It is genuinely nice to see terms that are concise, even if on this occasion, I may have misunderstood. I have avoided quite a number of products and services not because I was forbidden to use them, but because of the ambiguity that large, badly-formed documents cause.

If your lawyers and my sense of reasoning can come to a compromise I am still curious about what AeroFS has to offer so will return!

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We'd actually love to support DigitalOcean. I think I've reached out to them in the past and haven't gotten a response. So, if someone is reading there, send us a bump! I'm at yuri@aerofs.com

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If you're looking for a solution for 5,000 users, we should chat :) Feel free to shoot me an email at yuri@aerofs.com

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Hey there! Do you mind explaining the use case in a bit more detail?

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In the architectural industry, we use AutoCAD drawing files that require only one person to open and edit the file. Most cloud storage options don't lock the file when it's being accessed. Other people are able to open and edit the file and therefore the cloud software doesn't know which file was the parent holder and instead updates the file based on the most recent changes.Even Microsoft's Dynamic Cache Service doesn't have a file locking feature. Therefore we need to use something called GlobalScape.

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My 2 cents: many file systems do not have a file locking feature that can enforce file locking. In unix-like systems, file locks (e.g., lockf(3)) are "advisory" rather than mandatory, meaning it's up to the higher-layer apps to check whether another program has locked a file and voluntarily stop.

Any apps that do implement this feature likely do so by making the original file read-only and having the first app that opens the file work on a copy. However, I think Windows may have a mandatory file locking mechanism.

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Sounds like architects need a DVCS for CAD files :)

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This is the space things like solidworks EPDM are trying to service.

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AeroFS does allow you to share folders in a read-only way, so that only one-way syncing takes place. If only one user is authorized to edit a file, I think this should work for your use case, no?

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Sounds like a job for a version control system like perforce (it deals well with large binary files, supports locking and is free for up to 20 users)

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You could try Panzura or Nasuni. They both have file locking and are targeted at use cases like you describe.

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I suppose that depends on whether the customer thinks they're getting $500/mo of value out of the product :) If they don't, I certainly wouldn't fault them for not buying the product.

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It's different when you're adding another person and it's adding an additional 15$/month, and adding an additional 500$/month - even if overall it ends up being the same per person overall for both.

Think of it this way.

If you've got 30 people, you're using this product. Then you add another person.

Now all of a sudden you've got 500$/month expenditures suddenly appearing. The sudden appearance is much more likely to push people to alternative routes than a gradual increase.

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That's madness. What's the payroll for 30 people? $500/month isn't going to put a dent in that.

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It's not much, compared to other expenses, yes. But that's not what I'm saying.

I'm saying that someone is much more likely to look around for alternatives to do something if an expanse suddenly pops up than if an expense gradually does.

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Seems like a good point. What it should be is an increased gradient for the next 30 customers, i.e. after 30, each additional is $30 a month, and then after 60, each additional is back to $15. This would get rid of the cliff at 30, but still give you guys the same revenue at 60.

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nope.

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How does it work now? Has the client been rewritten?

I've just been going back over my emails from about a year ago when we decided to stop using aerofs because of stability issues. It doesn't make for pretty reading.

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We still use Java, but we package and ship our own lightweight JDK, so that we do not depend on system Java installations.

The JDK packager is open source, you can check it our on our github:

https://github.com/aerofs/openjdk-trim

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My question as well.

I like almost everything about AeroFS, except that the OS X client is (or seems to be) written in Java and doesn't feel native. It's kind of sluggish.

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The problems we had were, unfortunately, a little deeper than that.

We had to restart the client again and again to get it to sync. Eventually it gave up altogether.

At the time it took Aero customer support almost 2 weeks to respond. By that point we'd decided to migrate to dropbox.

That was a long time back so hopefully they've sorted out the issues now (with the client and lack of response with customer support). At the time it was fairly obvious to us that we couldn't use them for a key part of our business - it was just too risky.

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Sorry to hear you had a bad experience with our support team. Things have gotten much better in this area at our organization. Our average time to respond these days is a few hours.

If you ever decide to give us another shot feel free to ping me, I'd be happy to help you get up and running.

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