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In Brazil it's called "gambiarra", and the same mixed pride/shame feelings also apply.

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Great stuff! I happen to really like all recommendations that came in for me.

Some suggestions: this pure social graph approach could be vastly improved for music recommendation by aggregating tags, à la last.fm, or adding music-related features yielded by some waveform analysis.

For instance, I typed in Tame Impala and got these results in this order: Real Estate - Girls - Beach Fossils - Toro Y Moi - Washed Out - Wavves - James Blake. The first three relate well to modern psych rock of Tame Impala, but then things get a little strange: two chillwave acts, one correctly similar psych/noise rock act and a dubstep/downtempo artist!

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I'm a Ricty user, but Hermit looks really good, nice job! Also, loved that jellybean colorscheme.

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From my experience of meeting US citzens, even outside North America, it's fairly normal to get something like "Ohio", "Pensilvania" or "Wisconsin" when asking where they come from, as if I'd _of course_ know where those places are (I do).

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as a foreigner: The Smiths, Joy Division (and then New Order), the Stone Roses, the Happy Mondays.

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The Buzzcocks, The Chameleons, James (before they went awful), Inspiral Carpets, The Fall, Crispy Ambulance, and millions* more.

Plus the city itself is upmarket gentrified in the centre parts now. Just avoid the students and you'll be alright.

* ok, maybe tens.

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Well, you gotta love Mozzer. Is the rules.

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As a brazilian that have lived in India for some time, I could tell you that the form democracy present in both countries today has a lot to do with incidents such as the reported on the post. The historic distance between poverty and middle-class just grows as the public institutions can't provide basic (or with the minimium required quality) services to the poor: education, healthcare, housing, etc.

I don't agree with the _poor people have a different moral_ argument presented by 'gnufied, but there is an intense feeling of social tension on a daily basis on both countries, which is clearly related to the income gap and the almost tribal mindsets developed by those completely different realities.

Besides the economic factor, India also displays consequences from gender issues liked to its patriarcal society and sexual repression. Unsurprisingly, the lower part of the social pyramid is also the one that suffers more from a conflict between the exarcerbated sexuality pushed by media and the to be said moral values of society. The education system wouldn't reach that part of the population with the same quality as rich or middle-class people, which, as said on other comments, also suffers from that on a lesser degree.

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> Your right to consume drugs (which I fully support) stops when you begin to pollute the air I breathe.

Really? The air you breathe is mostly polluted by fossil fuel combustion. We should by that logic ban cars and power plants, not cigarettes.

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We should, and do, heavily regulate those activities. Banning them altogether is impractical, but we don't just give people carte blanche to dump whatever they feel like into the air.

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I really want to understand about morphisms and category theory after reading this. Can anyone point out any good introduction to the category theory behind those catamorphisms?

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More of a programming than a CT introduction, but very useful nonetheless: Functional Programming with Bananas, Lenses, Envelopes and Barbed Wire (1991), by Erik Meijer, Maarten Fokkinga, Ross Paterson

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here's some course materials

http://www.cse.chalmers.se/edu/course/afp/lectures.html

http://www.scs.stanford.edu/11au-cs240h/notes/

http://www.seas.upenn.edu/~cis194/lectures.html

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These slides may be of some help.

http://yogsototh.github.com/Category-Theory-Presentation

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>I am surprised that no one I met in Windows Azure team heard about Heroku or Rackspace, which are direct competitors. That’s acceptable, not everybody has to know these.

Am I the only one that thinks this is completely unacceptable?

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You are probably the only one that believes his statement.

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Given that the Mir discussion was on the front page some hours ago, this comment does have something _constructive_ to add.

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There is literally _nothing_ constructive about the comment. Related to recent news? Yes. Topical? Sure. Snitty? Yup. Constructive? Nope.

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Who said comments need to be constructive? We don't have to be working towards a better future every single second of the day, you know.

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Welcome to HackerNews. Please read this: http://ycombinator.com/newswelcome.html

"The most important principle on HN, though, is to make thoughtful comments. Thoughtful in both senses: both civil and substantial."

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Tell fingerprinter this about being civil.

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Yes, that's great, but that's got nothing to do with being constructive. Constructive comments are great, but someone could publish a long and interesting comment criticizing wayland or X11 without suggesting ways to improve. As long as the points are cogent, then the comment should make for worthy material. At no point do such criticisms have to make suggestions on how to improve wayland or X11. Just that they are civil, and substantial. Like you said.

Or maybe you're agreeing with me? It seems strange to redirect me to the newbie guide then.

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I took constructive as in constructive to the conversation, not to the person in general.

The definition of constructive is to serve a purpose, whether negative or positive it doesn't matter.

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