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Just for the record, the data and arrangement of the data in the blog post is completely contrived.

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Yeah, I wanted to focus on using pseudo elements to pull content in from data-attrs but obviously I could/should have gone into more detail on the other bits and pieces. Thanks for the suggestion.

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It's definitely not for every scenario. It will depend on your data, whether or not you need sorting as you mentioned, and how many total rows there are in the table (card effect becomes too much after 20 or so). However for this simple use case, we thought it the best way to go.

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Absolutely agreed. It works great for this situation.

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I linked to that post in the in the article and mentioned the reasons it was slightly different but built upon that idea. He throws his content in the stylesheets.

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Yup, though the different way to do it with data- attributes and no content in the stylesheet was also written about here [1] in 2012, and demo'd here [2] at the bottom of the page in the "No more tables" example.

We've been using this same technique in several projects where it seemed appropriate for the past few years and have been loving it.

[1] https://css-tricks.com/responsive-data-table-roundup/

[2] http://elvery.net/demo/responsive-tables/#no-more-tables

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Yeah, I presumed I wasn't the first under the sun to do it; just thought it would be interesting to write about since some of my fellow front-enders hadn't seen the technique and google didn't turn up either of those links :)

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And those links weren't very descriptive and didn't fully explain the technique, so definitely helps to add to the ecosystem.

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TM took over back in the late 80's as the underdog because they made the great business decision to give venues a cut of the pie as opposed to charging venues for their services - which is what their competitors did at the time.

They quickly took demolished the competition and began setting up long term contracts, usually between 3 and 10 years with each venue.

Then, in 2010 they merged with LiveNation who owns a vast majority of some of the nations largest, most popular venues.

Major artists' managers and promoters all have close ties to TM/LiveNation as well, because it's where the money is. So when Taylor Swift goes on tour, these folks make sure they hit a TM venue at each stop along the way.

That's just the tip of the iceberg, but you get the gist.

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So how does TM make money? Where is the cut for venues taken from? All from the booking fee?

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MGsalg2f9js&t=7m40s

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"There is nothing which I dread so much as a division of the republic into two great parties, each arranged under its leader, and concerting measures in opposition to each other. This, in my humble apprehension, is to be dreaded as the greatest political evil under our Constitution."

-John Adams

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That's just the thing - I don't think 'playing it safe' is the goal in Washington, or at least not the only one. As is, the goal for contractors is to stay on a project as long as possible, earning more money over a longer period of time. Waterfall is a perfect excuse to do just that.

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I agree that's an issue, but I was thinking more of the decisions of the people who hire the contractors. The right Agile approach to a project is to structure it as a series of small wins and losses, rather than rolling the bones on one big win/loss. It's my hope that calculus will appeal to career-minded officials, especially since the Agile approach lets you demonstrate value earlier (thus reducing drama), lets you bet more on your wins, and dramatically reduces the chances of large failures.

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'Playing it safe' is also the goal of the gov't civilian managers of those projects- they have a promotion schedule to hit and having a 'failure' on their resume jeopardizes that. And since they're only going to be there 2-3 years, the goal is just to keep things propped up until they rotate out.

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Unfortunately, you are in the vast minority of people, probably even on hacker news (I would guess less that 1% of overall population [1]).

So the decision has to be made, just like whether you want to support IE7 users, whether or not you want to put in the extra time to support those edge cases.

And as always, it depends on the type of site you are running. If it's Amazon, that 1% matters a shit ton. If it's a side project or SaaS startup for example, it makes sense to hold off on supporting those 1% in favor of more pressing features.

1.https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2013/10/21/how-many-people-are-missi...

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I think this is a legitimate question. Personally, it would be cool to scan lists of API's for idea inspiration but this doesn't really provide that functionality. Now what would be cool here, is if the APIs returned here had docs presented on the website with a consistent UX/UI. But then you would need an API for an API :)

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The apis.json format this looks for contains fields for formats like http://www.swagger.io/ which it could then pull in (or someone else could) to render the docs in line.

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Might be interesting to check this out https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8637324

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