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Atom has recently gained a significantly better support with the atom-elixir package. Adding language-elixir and linter-elixir packages creates a moderately enjoyable experience.

So, to say "I trust/distrust all media sources in equal measure" demonstrates a wilful ignorance, or incredible naiveté.

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>Having an effective universal annotation platform in wide use across the web

...funded by venture capital with an expectation of hyper growth and liquidity event would not necessarily be beneficial for all users. To put it mildly.

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>People keep complaining about how slow Atom is, how much memory it hogs up, etc

Which is exactly what people have been saying decades ago about Emacs, aka "Eight Megabytes And Constantly Swapping".

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The difference being that, functionality-wise, you don't get anything from using Atom over, say, Emacs or Vim. High memory and CPU utilization is a tradeoff I'm willing to take for the added benefit of running IntelliJ or Visual Studio, because as environments they do way more for certain code bases than either Vim or Emacs could do. But Atom? Not so much. "It's made of Javascript and HTML" is not an advantage (to me) worth the memory and lag.

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Atom adoption among SO developers increased from 2% in 2015 to 12% in 2016. VS Code is at 7.2% and it's not even out of beta.

Both Atom and VS Code are built on Electron so it seems that web tech for building code editors and IDEs is getting really popular.

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Elixirscript is a thing though and it's being actively developed https://github.com/bryanjos/elixirscript

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It's a good one to know about. Thanks!

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Robert Virding has just announced the release on twitter https://twitter.com/rvirding/status/710259707819249664

I feel that this LFE release further validates BEAM as a promising platform for future development of new programming languages. Also I look forward to reading SICP converted to LFE. Available chapters can be found here https://www.gitbook.com/book/lfe/sicp

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Given you mentioned SICP... SICP is cool for its math and its puzzle-like problems, but I found http://scheme.com/tspl4/ a much better introduction to Scheme and more likely to help me solve problems with Scheme in the real world (i.e. a good reference book).

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TcpKali mascot is an example of great visual identity for open source projects: kawaii-touched fearsome ancient god zapping servers. It's both memorable visual symbol and an apt metaphor for core feature (load generation).

RJ-45 connectors with a skull hanging from the neck and a latte cup are just cherries on top.

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To give credit where the credit is due: the mascot was created by a great graphical designer - Tatyana Alexandrova (https://twitter.com/Alextanya)

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Don't trust Alexa results, they are mostly useless.

Quantcast is usually more accurate and Quizlet US Rank on Quantcast is 37.

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I don't know about Go but Elixir/Erlang has a concurrency model that spreads one request workload over several cores.

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