Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | trxblazr's comments login

A decent number of Stanford CS undergrads/grads end up there.

-----


So realistically, what can we, the populace, do?

-----


I don't know how effective it will be, but until something changes, I plan on very vocally being a one-issue voter. I will vote for, and donate to the campaigns of, anyone who will do something to rein in the surveillance monster, and I will make sure that my sitting representative and senators are aware of this.

Unfortunately, one of my senators is Dianne "It's called defending America" Feinstein, and she's got her job for another 5 years, so I'm not expecting much in her case.

-----


Waste of time. No one cares about your vote anymore. If you really care, find like minded people and go into politics yourself. You'll have to start local, then move to state, but even the state level can begin to have an effect. I suspect their may be enough people to make actual change, but so far they waste time by doing online petitions, sending emails to politicians or voting.

If you want to change the US at this point you're going to have to do what the founding father's did: become the government you want.

-----


Echoing adventured, if you're going to stay and fight this legally, make sure you're sufficiently well armed* that government violence against us is too expensive. The relevant Alexander Solzhenitsyn quote from The GULAG Archipelago is:

"And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family?

"Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand?

"After all, you knew ahead of time that those bluecaps were out at night for no good purpose. And you could be sure ahead of time that you’d be cracking the skull of a cutthroat. Or what about the Black Maria [Government limo] sitting out there on the street with one lonely chauffeur — what if it had been driven off or its tires spiked.

"The Organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin’s thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt!"

* The minimum gun is a military grade bolt action rifle with a 5 round or greater magazine, anything like the Mauser 1898 (sic) or the many guns inspired by it or that evolved in parallel. The last remaining cheap, military surplus ones are Mosin–Nagants (you should be able to get one for $150 or so, just make sure to buy non-corrosive ammo). Buy Jeff Cooper's The Art of the Rifle (http://www.amazon.com/The-Art-Of-Rifle/dp/1581605927/) to learn how to wield it effectively.

-----


Only two sane choices.

Fight or flight.

1) Speak out, set up organizations like the EFF or similar to fight for privacy. Or advocate on behalf of such organizations. Work the politicians however you can, to whatever extent that might help. Encourage the people you know to do the same; encourage people to give a shit again. Explain why it's important to fight this.

2) Try to leave the US, or at least begin disappearing yourself. Leave less of a trail. Communicate as little as necessary over the phone or digitally, and keep it strictly business (so to speak). Use good encryption wherever you can. Encourage the people you know to do the same.

Either option is valid, both are entirely personal, moral choices. Some people stayed when the Iron Curtain went up in Russia and tried to fight it, some fled; ditto Germany, China, Vietnam, Venezuela, Cuba, and so on.

-----


Personally, I chose option 2. Much easier for me. Martyrs and activists do tend to win in the end, but they tend to be dead before victory is achieved.

-----


absolutely not. Just forge the referrer header.

-----


That's incorrect in this context, which is trying to get a victim to use their own browser to submit a request that uses cookies on said browser for authentication (CSRF). Please take a look at the following link:

"Although it is trivial to spoof the referer header on your own browser, it is impossible to do so in a CSRF attack."

(https://owasp.org/index.php/Cross-Site_Request_Forgery_(CSRF...)

-----


ASKING FOR HELP:

hi HN, I'll take the opportunity of this thread to ask for some advice. My current employer (a billion $ startup, ~200 employees) is asking all of us to work Saturdays (on top of the 12-13 hours I already work daily).

I value my weekends, a lot. It's not that I don't want to work. I love work and on weekends, I still do. I have spurs of intense creativity and code productivity, but I want to keep those weekends for myself.

How do I tell my employer that my weekends are not for sale? What should I expect from them if I say no more?

-----


Tell them that in exchange for 20% more time you expect a 20% pay raise. Talk about all the things you're going to have to give up if you take that extra time, and how that makes you unhappy. Since they're asking for something from you, they can't get mad at you for negotiating something in return. No one can call that unfair with a straight face. Most likely if you do this they probably won't actually give you 20% but will may offer you something much smaller. You can decide to either accept this, or, you can say that their counteroffer is not good enough for you, so you can't take the extra time. That way your reason to refuse is completely impersonal, and not because you don't care.

Regardless, start looking for another job in the meantime. The culture of where you work sounds completely inhumane.

-----


How do I tell my employer that my weekends are not for sale?

You could try selling him your weekends. And your nights.

Negotiate your position into a contract where you bill by the hour. That way he can have as many weekends as he likes. He can request you charge him for as many non-productive sleep-addled hours as there are in the week. Offer to "work" 24/7, so long as he's willing to pay.

The other way to pull this off is to get your entire team on board with the concept of "free time", "weekends", and "life". If everybody on your team were to slowly ramp their hours down to 40 per week, your employer would have but two choices: fire everybody or deal with it.

I've done both those things at various companies over the years. Both work nicely, provided you're prepared to land on the open market if things go south.

-----


I'd expect them to show you the door. If you want to stand firm on this point, be ready to look for a new job. (I'd personally be looking for a new job anyway if I was asked to work weekends; there's more to life than work.)

-----


I've been in the same position and it sucks a lot, especially when you aren't even being paid for the extra hours and you don't want to have to leave a company you feel invested in.

Please you need to stand up for yourself and likewise all of us, employers need to know that if they want quality engineers they need to treat them like quality human beings.

We cant let this become the new normal in our industry, the more of us that demand our right the less likely employers will be to try to take them in the future.

-----


"I'm not interested in doing that."

-----


"I'm sorry, that won't be possible." --Miss Manners

Also, if you're in the US and a normal software developer, and depending on your salary, your existing 12-13hr/day schedule may make you eligible for overtime and back pay.

-----


hint hint hint: echo 'am9icytiNjRAc2lmdHNjaWVuY2UuY29t' | base64 -D

-----


trxblazr, you have demonstrated poor judgement. Sift Science is trying to make a small attempt at filtering some of the inevitable spam that results from a public job posting. You spoiled it. Why? For what purpose? To show how smart you are?

Sift Science does not look like some arrogant company that has cooked up their own broken security system, and that deserves to be poked at this way. It is not a public service to defeat this quiz, a quiz that some people would have been happier solving on their own so as to have a fair shot at apply for the job.

-----


https://www.google.com/search?q=define+hint

-----


Ah, that would be why my attempts at a character-for-character deciphering failed...

-----


aww don't spoil the fun

-----


I sat in your ACM presentation the other day at Stanford. It was really awesome. Thanks for coming by and best of luck!

-----


Glad to hear it! I had a lot of fun coming back to campus. Good luck to you too!

carl @ sift

-----


I may be biased, but I hear Sift Science is a great place to work ;).

-----


sub HN, like subredit.

-----


I think the author meant for this to be a simple set of security guidelines for beginners. But yeah, any reasonably large prod stack should probably be deployed and setup with puppet and what not. It's DRY and less error prone than a human low on sleep.

-----


i wonder why that Chinese restaurant went out of business...

-----


"Youths from poor and rural families consistently end up paying much higher tuition in China than children from affluent and urban families. Yet they attend considerably worse institutions, education finance specialists say...The reason is that few children from poor families earn top marks on the national exams. So they are shunted to lower-quality schools that receive the smallest government subsidies. The result is that higher education is rapidly losing its role as a social leveler in China and as a safety valve for talented but poor youths to escape poverty."

So that's certainly true in America, and perhaps even more so in China. I think platforms like Coursera/Udacity can start leveling the playing field again for two reasons: first, if the technology is good enough (from personal experience, I would say so) and remains free, the studying-resources gap between rich and poor shrinks; second, even if you can't squeeze your way into a top school, you can still get a top-notch education for free. At the end of the day, i'm grossly oversimplifying things (i.e. the weight of credentials in Chinese society probably still far outweight actual demonstrated skill-set; or consider for a moment whether a family that lives on rice and a few vegetables a day can realistically afford a computer+internet-connection for their kids...), but i still think there's a sizable impact in here somewhere.

-----


I can't believe the article didn't mention hukou (like an intra-country passport) discrimination at all. The problem is much worse than they make it out to be: not only do you suffer from poorer schools and more tuition than your urban counterparts, the score you need to get on the test to get into a good urban university is actually HIGHER than what the urban kids need.

Having rural hukou is a b*tch.

-----


They did mention that urban kids don't have to score as much to get into urban schools. They didn't explain the mechanism by which is this is enforced.

-----


Ah, I missed that. I think the article should have made a bigger deal about how Hukou prevents rural folk from truly becoming urban folk.

-----


> or consider for a moment whether a family that lives on rice and a few vegetables a day can realistically afford a computer+internet-connection for their kids...

Only the absolute poorest Chinese won't be able to get internet access and a computer. The computer might cost ~1000 RMB (2 month's salary, for an extremely poor household). Maybe less, if they can put up with an old P4 getting tossed out by an internet cafe, which is now the color of a smoker's lungs. Internet will be ~50 to 100 RMB a month, and that's entertainment (and information) for the whole family. Getting access to online courses (which might rely on YouTube, which is blocked) might be tricky, as is the language barrier, but I'm sure China will have localised versions of the course. It's a major cost, but Chinese aren't starving, just poor. Once you have more than $2 a day, food isn't the only priority; healthcare and education is.

Migrant workers might be worse off than the poorest peasants, though, as they may not have a stable abode. You can't get your kid a computer if you're sharing a shanty-town room with 2 other families. Plus, getting a connection might not be possible. That's probably why migrant workers often leave their kids with grandma.

And yes, credentialism is an issue.

-----


We are talking about mountain people in Guizhou or Jiangxi though. These people are likely to still be fairly rustic and traditional, they aren't worried about Internet so much.

> That's probably why migrant workers often leave their kids with grandma.

Not really the main reason. Without Hukou, their kids can't even attend school. China is almost a caste-based society these days, where caste is determined by your Hukou.

-----


> language barrier [for online courses]

Well, not really, there is a huge part of online courses translated/subtitled to Chinese. That's my wife's job actually.

-----


On behalf of all non-native speakers from all over the World, who are trying their best to catch up with this whirlwind of booms-bust cycles, forced obsolescence, eroding of ways of life, and many other hardships that I cannot remember right away, just to try to make a [better] life [if not for themselves] for their loved ones, I would like to thank people like your wife for helping them in whatever manner possible.

-----


Well, they (the Chinese) already crowd sourcing their own subtitles for entertainment shows like Big Bang Theory. I don't see why that wouldn't happen in the courseware space as well, it is one of those things in China that is truly a creative commons.

-----


Many of these subtitles were poorly translated/mistranslated.

-----


That is true for India too. If one does not make top ranks to get into IITs, NITs or any other government subsidized college, they are forced to attend lower tier private institutions (Yeah, in India private colleges are at lower end) which cost at least 5-10x more than IITs.

-----


government run colleges better and cheaper than private run money-machines? That is a system working as expected.

-----


They are definetly cheaper due to govt. subsidy, but apart from IIT's and a few NIT's they aren't much different from private counterparts.

Remember that in India universities are not judged by the quality of their research, but solely on the "success" of their alumni. Since govt. colleges are cheaper, even though they might not be good, they do attract smart students. One thing that the Indian govt. did do right was to have a highly meritocratic system of admission, although that has recently suffered many setbacks

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: