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Years ago I did something kind of similar. I created my own Twitter client (never public and now defunct) but one of the features was that it would prevent one user from monopolizing my stream by hiding their posts after the three most recent. So say someone was live tweeting an event I would only see their three most recent, and after that it would display a collapsed bar to let me know it had hidden something.

Made skimming much easier, I still miss this feature.

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pmarca would hate that feature, it would interfere with his tweet storms. :)

In all seriousness, noise is the biggest problem I have with twitter. When you follow more than 100 accounts, the timeline becomes pretty much useless.

Your comment gives me another idea for my app though - we will make it so each of the Top 5 is from a different unique publisher... and if more than one of their comments are trending, we choose the 'fastest'.

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I had a similar idea in college which was to take the actual traffic for pages into account for search ranking (this was before Google bought whatever Analytics had been called before, I can't remember.) I had thought of it as a server side app which would benefit the hosts while feeding the search engine traffic data.

After talking with friends we explored the idea of a user side traffic tracking app as a way to feed the search engine, but I couldn't get enough traction and no one wanted to challenge not only Google but also IE/Firefox/Safari etc. because we felt it would be its own browser.

Alas.

Now a days I am more concerned about possible privacy issues, I feel for them launching a search engine that actively asks you to be tracked (even if anonymously), it's a hard sell during this current resistance to that entire idea.

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Urchin (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urchin_(software))

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> We felt it would be its own browser.

Why not a browser add-on or extension?

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At the time FF was still behind IE and IE hadn't really adopted extensions yet, I think. It's a bit fuzzy how we got there, this wasn't like a formal business plan and analysis, this was some college guys in the dorms chewing on an idea for a few weeks.

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I'm in my late twenties and I know both brands though I had almost zero interaction with Zagat in any purposeful sort of way. I never sought out a list of Zagat rated restaurants. I did use Frommer's for trip planning though often it was browsing in the bookstore or library rather than purchasing.

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Interesting, though not entirely surprising. I'd surmise that your usage is representative the maximum utility for most people under 40.

Did you seek them out or did you discover them incidentally while in the respective "Travel" sections?

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Search didn't work for me, Windows 7 / Chrome. After a reload I see that it relies on autocomplete and hitting enter does nothing, you have to select from the drop down.

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The forced selection from the drop down turned me off, too.

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The terms during purchase made it sound like if they discovered a ticket was sold for higher than $45, then they would cancel the ticket without refund. So both buyer and seller get screwed.

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This doesn't match the text on the site: "If the ticket is found to be offered for resale above face value we may invalidate the barcode and refund the ticket price."

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It's not clear who gets the refund here. If the scalper, then he has no risk, and earns both the money he sold it for AND the refund of the original fee. Win! This is also likely the only refund they can do since they don't have the credit card number of the person who bought the scalped ticket.

If they refund the final purchaser, then the scalper still makes his money and the purchaser loses the amount above the face value.

In both scenarios, the scalper makes his money, or even more than he would have otherwise.

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He probably eats a charge back from the customer meaning he makes nothing if found out.

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If the final purchaser is aware that their high-price ticket could be nullified at the door, it removes motive to buy in the first place, leaving the scalper with hard-to-move tickets.

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Perhaps the refund isn't digital? I.e. you get refunded at the entrance if you have a scalped ticket

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That would make the most sense and is how I read the language. You're free to go buy an $80 scalped ticket if you want. But if they can figure out it was scalped, they'll just cancel the ticket and refund your $45 ticket price right at the show.

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Zuckerberg deserves many of the accolades he's received for his maturation at the helm of Facebook, but I can't help but wonder what would have happened to him had Facebook failed?

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He'd probably be a mid-level software engineer at Sony, a division of Myspace.

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Still loading and working fine for me.

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Same here.

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I was thinking the same thing.

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I hate that the client claims network problems rather than showing an error for their system being down.

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I was toying with a similar idea though it's more akin to the Netflix model for clothes.

You'd basically pay an up front cost, say $XXX and then you would be able to order a week's worth of clothes. Then you'd mail the clothes back for laundering before being sent out again.

It is really a half-baked idea and requires a sizable amount of logistics, etc. But it was an interesting concept to toss around.

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I think that you're onto something there. I need to wear a suit three times a year. Most of my friends are the same way. We all have a suit in our respective closets, but it's just taking up space for most of the year. Now, we're different enough sizes that we couldn't all just share one suit, but, if you had a few thousand clients, you could certainly send a fitting suit to the fellow who needs it, when he needs it.

There's also a huge boon to be found in having branches in both hemispheres. Instead of spending December paying the land tax on a warehouse full of shorts, just rent them out in Australia. Then, come July, send out the shorts in the US and the sweaters down under.

I'm not sure about the environmental impact. On the one hand, you have quite a bit of carbon footprint from shipping the clothes all around. On the other hand, the company would have a strong economic incentive to maintain the clothes. I'm betting a lot of clothes that are currently thrown away could be saved with proper cleaning and sewing skills. I'm now imagining reading the company's blog having less posts on Redis integration and far more on their new way to remove grass stains.

Honestly, given the sizing issues, this probably makes more sense for men's clothes, but that avoids competition with 99dresses.

Dammit. I'm going to be thinking about this all night.

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If I'm a guy who occasionally has to wear a suit, it seems like it would be a lot cheaper for me to pay the fixed cost of acquiring it than the ongoing cost of having it shipped to me every so often when I want to wear it. And it's another thing to remember and worry about.

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I'm more than happy to toss the idea around with you, I think it's an interesting idea and if it reached critical mass it could do really well - but I'm skeptical it could get there and that the price points would be such that consumers would be interested.

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I've been thinking about this exact idea for the past month or so and still love it. I recently tried Trunk Club, which is a similar service but they actually select the clothes for you and you only pay for what you keep and send the rest back. The inherent ownership problem still remains, though--there's yet one more pair of pants or shirt taking up space in your closet that you'll eventually get sick of (that and it was really expensive--like $175 for a button-down expensive).

I like the idea of having a somewhat curated selection of some top brands like Banana Republic, J.Crew, Gap, etc. and being able to choose a certain number of items to take out at one time. I'd pay upwards of $200/mo if it meant I had an endless rotation of new clothes to try on without having to keep. And if you like the garment? Feel free to keep it and pay retail.

The collaborative consumption model is disrupting industry after industry, and it's only a matter of time before someone gets it right in fashion. I would honestly consider starting this myself, but I just left a startup and joined the Goog less than a month ago--need some stability for awhile.

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