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This isn't a "who is hiring?" thread obviously, but if anyone wants to be a part of our team we are always looking for folks who share our passion for space, especially those who happen to build software too!

https://www.blueorigin.com/careers

Needless to say, there are tons of interesting problems to solve and opportunities to make a huge impact.

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Tempting. Are your working hours more reasonable than SpaceX? With a family to love, 70-hour weeks just don't fit well.

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Well we all know that Bezos is known for his healthy and reasonable approach to work-life balance.

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I'm surprised The Times was even invited for the tour.

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I do not envy those who place their quality of life in the middle of a pissing contest between Bezos and Musk.

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Progress is not cheap, nor easy on the soul.

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Yeah but... to a degree, right? Many amazing things have been accomplished by people not working themselves to death. If the workforce convinces itself that people are expendable then I suppose people are expendable! I however choose to fight this attitude. Frightened, stressed people work hastefully and make mistakes... somehow the worst thing imaginable for a space exploration company, right?

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Well, to use our last space race as an example: several engineers who worked on Apollo said during interviews that they strongly suspected the consistently long hours they and many others worked directly contributed to later divorces. (My source is the excellent series Moon Machines, for those curious; I believe it was the Navigation episode.)

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Many truly incredible things were built at some cost in human lives. I recently watched a documentary which said large tunneling projects expected to lose one man per X miles dug, a few decades ago.

I'm not saying you should be willing to die for your work. But historically someone always seems to be. Not least of all in the space business.

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Are you really completely oblivious to the working conditions of workers at those times? I think the workers were as passionate about their work as the capitalist was for worker welfare and safety expenses.

Sorry but this comment and some child comments are truly shocking for me in their historical ignorance.

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The truly incredible things tend to be created/discovered by the most passionate. This means you'll have selection bias on the people who have a tendency to "work themselves to death" for the cause they're passionate about. It does not mean that you have to work yourself to death to arrive there.

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I presume this topic is less about dying for your work, rather about screwing up your relationships, marriage, ending childhood of your kids with divorce and similar.

Reality of an engineering employee even for such a company is, success means bringing tiny increase ineffectiveness, weight reduction etc. into super complex system. No truly world changing discoveries. If you are alone, do whatever you want with your life. But once you go for family, working 70-hour weeks is plain stupid, selfish or just extremely bad deal. No work is worth making decisions that you will regret for the rest of your life.

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I agree. I think I'd just add that I really believe that the climate of fear that seems to exist in these super high pressure companies creates the wrong incentives. Would we be okay with a bridge building company being a super high stress environment? I think it's somehow more obvious why this is a bad idea. The problem then is that you're fundamentally making a time-quality tradeoff. If you're okay with this, you're saying you're willing to risk the lives of the people you're sending into space a little more to get ahead in the race. I suppose this will always be true, but where do you wanna be on the curve?

I've had many different kinds of managers. I've had the type that encouraged me to slow down and think carefully about what I'm doing at every step, and I've had the kind that keeps a watchful eye and is always asking "Why isn't this done yet?" Under the latter I started grinding my teeth at night and started engineering things in a fairly brittle way... but my rote productivity was higher than it had ever been. Managerial styles are all engineering decisions just as any other are.

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This makes Steve Jobs 'tyrannic' glow a little pale all of a sudden.

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It's disgusting. I think it's given people in high places excuses TO be assholes.

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I'm not for it, but ultimately nature wins, if someones thinks taking incommensurate amount of pain for a goal no one will change his/her mind.

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Progress demands not one tear his soul asunder! As the sweat of a man can be stretched far, so too can the Company above increase their efforts of hiring.

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I'm happy to let somebody else do the spending.

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You try to push the world to the next level but only hire in the US?

There must be a lot of stuff that you need which is not really limited by US law and that people could work on from their home countries. Examples just in software engineering: Cloud infrastructure, user interfaces, communication platforms, open source projects that are 90% of where you needed them to be to use them, BSP layers for embedded systems you want to use.

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I would suspect that a lot of what they do would probably be covered by ITAR. If that is the case then the compliance burden is probably going to be a lot easier to meet if everyone is US based.

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They likely will have ITAR hardware in the same workspace as the software guys to minimize logistical overhead. Foreign nationals can't see any ITAR stuff.

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"Foreign nationals can't see any ITAR stuff."

If only it was that simple - in a former job I designed systems for a non-US multinational that did ITAR work and it was incredibly painful to work out the rules for who could or could not see particular items of data.

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Slight nitpick - US permanent residents (green card holders) can see ITAR stuff even though they're foreign nationals.

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Who would want aliens working on their spaceship, after all...

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I understand there could be regulations, but these things not add up for me.

>Applicants must be a United States citizen ... >We hold all information confidential and are an equal opportunity employer.

[1]Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, protects applicants and employees from discrimination in hiring, promotion, discharge, pay, fringe benefits, job training, classification, referral, and other aspects of employment, on the basis of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), or national origin.

[1]http://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster...

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The civil right act only holds for American citizens and green-card holders.

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Thanks, it makes sense.

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It's not the civil rights act, but the immigration reform act that would be relevant here:

"Employers should not ask whether or not a job applicant is a United States citizen before making an offer of employment... the law prohibits employers from hiring only U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents unless required to do so by law, regulation or government contract" [1]

However, from the job listings, it sounds like that all employees would have access to regulated information, thus exempting them from the prohibition:

"...U.S. citizen, permanent resident alien or otherwise able to review all export-controlled technical information."

[1] http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/practices/inquiries_citizenship.cfm

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IANAL, but national origin and citizenship are two different things.

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Yes. There are legitimate reasons for companies operating in certain sectors to require US citizenship. In fact, non-citizens are not even allowed in the facilities of some companies. Still, the myth persists that citizenship is always a prohibited requirement.

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Well considering that US space tech is like 30 years ahead of most other countries, e.g. China, it makes sense. I mean they steal everything else, gotta keep some things secret.

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Let's not be too proud of ourselves... the Chinese can at least get humans into space on their own right now.

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Which the US did in 1961...

The Chinese do silly things like blow up satellites (causing space debris), to show their might - things that the US had done 30 years ago.

Whereas, the US has systems that can track and predict all space debris of sizes greater than 1/2 inch.

It's just orders of magnitude more advanced.

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One might note that a year after the Chinese anti-satellite missile test, the US did the same exact thing, also producing orbital debris: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Burnt_Frost

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This suggests that no debris was created:

http://www.defensemedianetwork.com/stories/u-s-navy-missile-...

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Plenty of debris was created, it was just in a low and decaying orbit so it was mostly gone in a few days. By contrast most of the debris from the Chinese test will still be there in 2030 unless someone goes out and cleans it up.

On the other hand the argument was about China's technical abilities and intercepting something in a higher orbit with a faster closing velocity is harder to do than the US's anti-satellite test. The Chinese proved they could destroy surveillance satellites and the US didn't really show that they could do the same.

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Serious question: can applicants be assured that the project won't be used to kill people? One can never be too sure when government grants are paying the bills.

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Getting a "Won't be" assurance is probably going to be next to impossible. Anything could happen in such an unspecified amount of time. A "isn't currently intended to" would likely be easier to get.

That said, with so many viable missile platforms, why would Blue Origin be used for that?

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> That said, with so many viable missile platforms, why would Blue Origin be used for that?

I know very little about the vertical. As a matter of principle, I typically avoid gigs that involve government funding. However, this one is more interesting than most.

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How do you do that? Where do you draw the line? Basically every company I've worked for has, at some point and to varying levels, taken government funding. It could be buying off the shelf products in the same manner as every other customer, it could be the company creating a modified product for the government, or it could be taking funding in the form of R&D tax credits.

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> It could be buying off the shelf products in the same manner as every other customer

What do you mean?

The only company I've worked for for any length of time that was funded in part by government funds was WNYC, which was a blast!

Public Radio to me is one of those times where the broken clock happens to show the right time of day. Sure, it's government funding, but the content we created was really stellar.

I mean, on some higher political level, there's always the "you use the roads" argument, but I'm talking about having to report to someone in the government about how their funding is being used. That's what I object to.

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Nobody has wanted to use cryogenic liquid fueled rockets to kill people since rockets that weren't like that were invented. It takes hours to get one ready to fire which might have been worthwhile[1] for the first ICBMs in the era before satellite surveillance but any modern military would be crazy to use one.

But if you're worried about launching military communication satellites, well, they probably will be at some point.

[1] Not my view of what's worthwhile of course.

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Whatever assurances they can give you today cannot be generalized to tomorrow.

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Well, something like a, "look at the ethical guidelines in our bylaws" might be helpful, even amidst inability to predict the future.

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Probably a bad bet. Blue Origin intends to build an orbital launcher, and they will almost certainly end up launching military satellites, including those which directly aid combat operations. That might be too much across the line for some people.

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Rest assured - any form of technological progress will be used to kill people eventually. "Now we are all sons of a bitches."

It is the world's nature.

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'cmon its aprivate company, its Bezos, its capitalistic. So at any point in time, if one has to choose between death of some and company survival, you'll hear : "sorry, but this year finacial results are not in line with investors' expectations; we must, although we're not happy with it, broaden our scope to military applications in order to avoid many layoffs"... Standard 20th century business procedure...

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It will almost certainly be used to kill people... eventually.

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"...opportunities to make a huge impact"

Hopefully, not a literal impact :)

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My impression is that unless you're a C++ developer doing avionics, all the development jobs are back in "cost center" areas. Do you think that's accurate?

I considered applying a few months ago but my current employer (large conglom-o-corp that ate my old company) has made me nervous about being walled-off as a code-monkey.

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I also had that same impression. I mentioned these thoughts in another thread here on HN (regarding SpaceX) and one of the engineers chimed in saying they have many positions across different areas. I still think it would be cool to join something like this, but would prefer to work on some lower level stuff. I'm currently a Full Stack web developer.

Is there a path to from my current position to something more systems related? Has anyone made this transition before?

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No, it is currently impossible to learn how to do C++/systems programming, the knowledge doesn't exist!

Are you serious? People come to be systems programmers with no programming experience, obviously with some web/server experience will be even more suited to learn it.

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There definitely is a space for vast amount of kinds of interesting software engineering and research jobs.

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Presumably ‘anyone’ is ‘anyone that’s a US citizen’?

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I love wpull!

I'm actually considering using it for a large upcoming project but unfortunately there are some pretty significant bugs in their backlog. wget seems to be a bit more battle hardened.

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Maybe in certain countries, but the big picture is that worldwide barrels/per/day consumption is continuing to increase:

2014: 92,086,000

2013: 91,243,000

2012: 89,846,000

2011: 88,974,000

2010: 87,864,000

Almost all that increase in consumption is attributable to Asia. Any downturn in the curve will be attributable to the economy of China slowing, not renewables taking the place of oil.

I don't disagree that the consumption of renewables is growing rapidly, but that doesn't mean they're making a dent in oil consumption. They may down the road at some point, but right now they're a spit in the ocean.

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Why do you hate VM's so much? Usability? Or is there some technical reason?

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Because VMware has essentially abandoned their client virtualization software? (Workstation 11 is a paid minor bug fix.) While it's way better than VirtualBox, it's still annoying. Stuff like USB devices will randomly not work. You need more system resources, which heats up the machine, making it hot to the touch. Oh and it crashes at times, too. With Windows-on-Windows setup, I was having daily crashes. VMware doesn't seem to care and offers no support with the product (gotta buy a company support plan). They even had a kb article to the effect of "Known issue: Workstation crashes when you run Office 2007".

It's usable, just a bit annoying. I feel little option but to run Windows as a host OS in order to get best driver/video/battery support, so VMware is essentially mandatory.

It's also a huge attack surface.

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Just slowness and usability. Also: as a defense, it's imperfect.

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I lead the software team at Blue Origin, come check us out. We're right outside Seattle.

https://www.blueorigin.com

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Any C++ positions without US citizenship requirement?

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We are hiring C++ folks, but applicants for any position (not just software) must be a US Citizen or permanent resident alien.

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Bank of America has this too for their cards, it's called ShopSafe.

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I generate the report as a normal HTML page and then render/export it using PhantomJS. Easiest solution I've found so far and I've done quite a bit of exploring.

https://github.com/ariya/phantomjs/blob/master/examples/rast...

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Your claims seem inconsistent across the site. On the page you linked to it says "Payment can be made monthly, but a two year contract is required." but then on the CEO page, it says "There are no contracts, overages, fees, or license charges at rsync.net." -- so am I missing something?

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I'd guess there is no contract for "standard" prices (up to 10 TB: http://www.rsync.net/products/pricing.html) but then if you want more and go into the petabyte scale, arrangements have to be made.

It's also interesting to see that rsync.net pricing is higher for "standard" scales and can compete with S3 only when in the PB scale.

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I'm sure they have an app for that. Maybe more than one.

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There will be significant launch insurance contracts written to protect the company against such a scenario.

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Drawing up those insurance contracts is a non-trivial endeavour too. There are specialist space divisions of major insurers who can package up space reinsurance as a nice investment whose returns are uncorrelated with market returns, but they're already in a situation where in years where one launch incident involving a sufficiently expensive satellite payload can wipe out the profits for the whole space insurance industry in a year. They make it back in future years because of the continuing demand for satellite launches. Now imagine there are people on board, the rocket is headed to colonise Mars and the CEO is on board. Not all of that risk to the future of private sector space industry as a whole is insurable.

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