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You've always had this.

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Not back in the days of loading programs from cassette tape I didn't.

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We have come full circle: implementing WSDL code generation with JSON definitions.

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iOS has always supported at-runtime permission requests (microphone, camera, camera roll, location, contacts, etc).

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Twitter - Software Engineer - San Francisco, CA

My team is Observability at Twitter; we work on monitoring and we’re looking for distributed systems engineers and full-stack engineers. We are one of the largest monitoring stacks in the industry, writing up to 15 million metrics per second for all production services at Twitter. We also have a front-end service that is used every day by most engineers at Twitter. We write our services in Scala, use a state-of-art Cassandra-like database called Manhattan, and if you join, you’ll get to work on challenging problems from day one.

Here are some of the things we’ve done in the past 12 months:

- Made our alerting execution service seamlessly fail over across datacenters

- Implemented a temporal set membership service for our database to keep track of metric groupings

- Added tiering policies for metrics based on their automatically-derived significance

- Added hybrid online/offline processing of data for different use cases

- Optimized the time-series query language to make reads more efficient

- Made an asynchronous query processor to support expensive queries with lower latency requirements

- Wrote a client-side agent that collects and reports metrics to the storage system

Our team is 12 people, including back-end, front-end, full-stack and reliability engineers. You can find out more by reading last year’s article here: https://blog.twitter.com/2013/observability-at-twitter. More formal list of requirements for the position is here: https://about.twitter.com/careers/positions?jvi=oO0WXfwr,Job.

Engineers from foreign countries, H-1B initiations and transfers are welcome. You can reach out to me directly at yann@twitter.com.

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Amazon AWS has 2FA, clearly not used (unless it actually was an inside job).

As for the cooling off period, I'm not sure. Perhaps you can get the contents back, but it may be cost prohibitive.

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FPGAs cannot model a transistor level design - you would need to replicate the mask set for that.

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This was also the entire premise of the Transmeta CPUs

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It is however not needed as the wattage is also available.

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Only if the safe is properly secured. Thieves are more than willing to carry a safe away if they can.

Bolting to the floor/wall is a must.

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Running ZFS for many years has shown, yes, this happens, and will continue to get worse as density goes up.

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Density is exactly the problem. The chances of an unrecoverable error are around 1 per trillion! But oh wait, you have 2 trillion bits on that disk?

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I've been running ZFS on several servers with tenfolds of TB's with data. I see checksum errors every month, from a single bit to several megabytes.

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That sounds like you have something else wrong. With ECC memory on server hardware, we've seen 0 checksum errors in the last 6 months and I've seen only 2 ever. A typical server has 136TB of raw hdd space and we get about 71TiB usable. It's about 80% full.

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