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Your stock market idea is interesting, however it wouldn't work well at all and would destroy the entire pro scene. If you check http://dotabuff.com/heroes/played you'll see the list of most played heroes and their win rates. The heroes who most likely need buffs will be at the bottom of that list. In a stock market simulation you would have people bidding on their favorite (popular) hero or against their most hated (popular) hero. Heroes like Invoker who have a 40% pub win rate are actually balanced for pro players with a 50% win rate. Given the popularity of invoker and the low win rate, we could expect a good amount of buffs causing the pro-metagame to shift to invoker being #1 pick.

Basically, balancing is hard.

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What if every hero got nerfed a little on a regular basis, and people voted to keep their favorites from being nerfed? Then apply some buffing to the least-voted heroes...

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Security by obscurity is perfectly fine when it's part of a layered approach. It will help keep attackers from learning the details of your architecture and will also stop skiddies in their tracks.

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This. Obscurity has too much bad press. It's not to be depended on, but it can be a useful addition sometimes.

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Exactly.

(Your most secure server) is not as secure as (your most secure server with some obscurity added).

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I'm not sure I understand anything new by looking at this. Cool graphics, but is there some key point i'm missing?

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Personally I was interested in seeing how much different committers have contributed to projects. For example, Linus Torvalds and Git: http://tomiaijo.github.io/github-treemaps/#/repository/36502... .

Also it is quite interesting to see the different programming languages used in projects. For example, Git has almost as much Bash scripts as C code: http://tomiaijo.github.io/github-treemaps/#/repository/36502... .

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Sort of. All of the test scripts are written in bourne shell. There are ~10K lines of bourne shell in git itself, and ~136K lines of test scripts.

That may be nitpicking, but I think it also goes to show that sometimes seemingly simple numbers or visualizations can miss subtle but important points.

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This piece and the [EM Briefcase](https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8228755) made me realize how much IEEE Spectrum appears to be PR. Is this normal, are we being duped?

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What seemed PRish to you in those articles?

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It's not exactly pure PR/propaganda, but it's definitely the most consumer-oriented of IEEE's publications. I'd place it somewhere between mags like Popular Mechanics and full-on topic-specific engineering journals. I actually find it quite good in general, though I don't like reading about war tech; I'm sure the U.S. military pushes hard to get stories in it. And most people don't realize that most technology follows a military->big business->everyday consumer path.

Which is why anyone who is not completely narcotized realizes self-driving cars won't be hitting the suburbs until they're thoroughly deployed in the military and internal to big business. So we are being duped in the way that our daydreams are supporting research that we'll be the last ones to enjoy... just look at the internet and cellphones. The military and big business had them for decades before "us".

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One of my issues is that this article discusses the Zumwalt's main failures as being too 'avant-garde' where it was a classic example of a jack of all trades, master of none. The whole ship was supposed to have swappable 'mission packs' that would let it do anything while being stealthy, fast, cheap, modern etc... The article has a very pro-Zumwalt / Bath Iron works (mentioned several times) spin to it. The EM Briefcase was written by the president of the company cited in the article (Metatech). It sounds a lot like PG's suits essay.

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I suppose but then why not take into account gas usage between households?

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But the whole point is that this browser isn't meant for technical people. It's not meant for the kind of people that feel the need for a different `Downloads` folder.

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Most of the comments against it here are in this same line. If the concept of NoScript even vaguely makes sense to you, or you've even heard the words "window manager" together, you're probably not the target audience.

I'll admit that most of these things (especially no settings) would make it a no-go for me, but I can definitely think of some relatives that I would love to stick on it and then not have to worry about them again.

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facebook is a huge tech company much on the scale of google. People are curious because it's like watching Goliath trip himself and fall down.

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It seems like DDG is positioning itself to become WolframAlpha for tech. Hopefully, this will allow it to better catch the exact market segment that would be wary of search engine tracking (educated tech-savvy people).

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While it may be too expensive to have it made entirely by a craftsman the US, if you're up to the challenge you can join a woodworking shop and learn how to build it. It will certainly take more time but you will get a more complete experience than simply designing it.

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can this algorithm be run lazily? ie, can you continue to generate continuous terrain using this technique or do you need to generate the whole map ahead of time?

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It can be run lazily in two ways: first, you can lazily add detail (ie, render down to a specific level of detail and postpone the rest); second, you can lazily build grid blocks out to the horizon (eg, for walking around a terrain first-person). So detail vs size laziness.

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