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Whaat? I've had nothing but bad experiences with PayPal, and to top it off, the only actual payment method with them seems to be credit card anyways. Also, typically when using credit or debit card with European merchants, there's extra security in the form of OTP list provided by the issuer, checked during the transaction process. I understand this is not (always?) mandatory and the merchant may be storing CC numbers irresponsibly, but the direction seems to be right. What are the possible upsides of PayPal?

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I've been funding my Paypal account through bank transfers for as long as I can remember now. It is not linked directly to my debit card/bank account. This makes it impossible for any credit card fraud to happen, or for me to lose any money if any of my online accounts are breached.

It also does not depend on me having a credit card. Which I do not, because I do not require one and having one would add a fee to my account.

The best solution is iDeal, but sadly that is a national thing.

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If you look at the ssllabs analysis, they already fail in IE 6 handshake simulation. Offhand I can't say if support for older browser is incompatible with more modern ciphers and protocols.

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Brian from Backblaze here. Why do we get a bad grade for not talking with IE6? I'm honestly curious... I thought anybody who supported IE6 should be downgraded, because IE6 was end of lifed, inherently using it is a bad bad bad thing. It is literally safer to not use it than use it, right?

I don't think it's even possible to run IE6 on Windows Vista or Windows 7 or Windows 8, but I'm not entirely sure of that.

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Yea, that is a false claim and not what OP means.

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The mozilla wikipage on TLS configuration has good information on ciphersuites and supported browser: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9000235

The intermediate suite (default) says: "Firefox 1, Chrome 1, IE 7, Opera 5 and Safari 1. " The "Old backward compatibility" has IE6, but it also has SSL3, which is really not recommended.

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It should not be incompatible. Servers will just select 3DES or RC4 suites for older browsers that only have these listed.

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Karpathy had a different interpretation (in the green bar at the top of the page). For example, purple would be neuroscience.

In addition to adjusting k, another change that might be interesting would be to include also previous years' papers in the model estimation. Changes in component (topic) weights year-over-year could perhaps reveal something about the topics, or the papers.

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I'm quite sure it can have consequences (just don't think it will). Some countries have declared bitcoin to be illegal (see for example https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_Bitcoin_by_country for details), so it may be enough to participate in a scheme where receiving them is typical to put someone in jeopardy.

As to punishing somebody for actions of others, that is perhaps not typical (although I think some countries actually do punish women for the actions of men, finding examples left as an excercise for the reader). However, you can cause considerable trouble for sending items (say, by international mail) which are legal in your jurisdiction to someone in whose jurisdiction they are not allowed. I'm living in a relatively modern western society, but would still prefer you did not send me cash, drugs or weapons to me with or without my knowledge.

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But you did not participate unless you define participate as having your name show up in some database. For your other examples, yes, you can of course become suspect and get some trouble if somebody wants to, but still someone has to prove that you are actually responsible. I meant it in the sense of getting fined, arrested or whatnot, not in the sense of costing you time which may of course not be negligible in serious cases.

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How well commonly quoted benchmarks (passmark, geekbench, cinebench etc) measure a processor as a VM host? Obviously single core benchmarks are somewhat representative, but miss things like cache sizes at different levels and hyperthreading. Are there benchmarks that would take those into account or would otherwise be good for planning VM host use case?

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For VM hosts -- the number of cores (plus their respective resources like cache, etc) are more important than how performant each core is individually. Usually for hosting companies, density is more important than raw performance, making 32 cores in 1 physical host very attractive.

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Aren't bad blocks detected during scrubbing? I assumed scrubbing every two weeks (as I do) should reveal read problems before any drives fail, at least in the common case. Maybe there's something important I'm missing?

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No, you're not missing anything. Scrubbing catches it all. Seems your parent is concerned about errors between last scrub and a failure.

This is why I have a backup system that I zfs send to.

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I am not from Americas, and had never heard of the concept of Nine Nations. If you're equally lost with some of the terms ("Dixie"? "The Foundry"?) or the overall theory, this sheds some light on it: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nine_Nations (but unfortunately does not provide links for some of the regions). Anyone know of a better online exposition?

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"Dixie" generally refers to states south of the Mason-Dixon survey line where slavery was legal. This map's concept of Dixie includes some areas above that line and excludes some areas inside it, like most of Texas and Missouri. "The Foundry" seems like a euphemism for the more commonly used term "Rust Belt." It's an area that traditionally has had lots of heavy industry, but has largely been in economic decline in the last 20-30 years.

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The book itself would probably be the best source for detailed descriptions of the different regions. It has to be available as an e-book too. Worth buying if you'd like to learn more about general cultural regions and boundaries in the US, or pirating if you don't have the funds. Just remember that even 3 decades ago it had some inaccuracies, many of which are pointed out in this thread. But it is a good primer, not very long, and a light, entertaining read, in my opinion.

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I wonder how this is different from other similar services, for example milanuncios has heaps of private homes available for letting (or subletting) also in Catalonia. In my experience both work the same, airbnb feels more trustworthy and is easier to use, milanuncios has wider selection. Anyone know the law in question? In hotels the accommodation tax was, I think, 50 cents per adult guest, something that could probably easily be factored in airbnb's service.

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As I commented below, the law says that a private place (like my home) can't be repeatedly rented without being registered as a home (full home) for rent. Also, separate bedrooms can't be legally rented (unless the full home is rented): it's either full house or nothing (personally I find it rather stupid a bedroom can't be rented legally, but anyway.) Likewise for stays longer than 30 days. It's not a matter of acomodation tax, is that homes (except those registered as tourist apartments, which implies the full house) are outside the laws.

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That's true, but network equipment, including mobile baseband processors, are silicon as well. Exploiting them would need help from the network operator, but I think mobile carriers are not very protective of their customers against government inquiries (or at all).

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Why go to the network operator? Simply fire up your own, the hardware is sub-$1000 these days and the software open source.

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Care to elaborate? As a customer I'm curious.

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Don't feed the troll, OVH's DDOS is state of the art. There is a LOT of reading about it on their blog.

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Sorry. I was completely oblivious to that. Will check, thanks.

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