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These projects are still extremely awesome for those of us running older CPUs!

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As they are being featured their promo art is shown to users before they get to the page for that particular app (see the screenshots for their new and old images - you can see it is part of a scrolling bar of promo images).

If they weren't being featured, the promo art would only be seen by users that clicked through to the app's page - users would only have seen the app's icon before getting the app's landing page.

So I think featured vs not featured makes a big difference to the importance of the promo art.

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I was thinking that I would be reluctant too, but then I realised that I have given plenty of SaaS companys my CC up front - sometimes not even for a free trial (but usually with a moneyback guarantee). E.g Linode and JungleDisk.

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I wouldn't have called it poor English! I wouldn't have guessed from the text that you aren't a native English speaker - I had to check your About page to be sure.

Your writing isn't as polished as, say, Paul Graham's writing, but then very few people can write at that standard.

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Australia has a long history of making bad decisions involving the local wildlife, which is why they are now super-cautious when it comes to things like this.

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Take advantage of what you've paid for, but be aware that what you have paid for is far more than just access to educators and educational resources.

Make connections with as many people as you can: fellow students, grad students, professors, everyone. That guy who sits next to you in class might turn out to be in a position to help you out in 5 years (and you might be in a position to help him).

Take advantage of extra curricula activities, clubs, interest groups, etc. Is there something you're kind of maybe interested in? It's going to be much easier to find a group of like minded people at college than it is in the "real world".

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It's my experience that almost everyone takes too much advantage of the social life and not enough of the academic life. In no way does 20-30 hours of school work a week crowd out the rich variety of social interactions a campus offers.

Just don't spend it all on the internet, is what I'm saying.

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It's not okay to plagiarise someone else's thesis paper, because the entire point of a thesis paper is to demonstrate your own ability to think/research/etc. If you plagiarise a paper you can fully expect your university/college/school to reject the paper, and you suffer the consequences.

I don't think the same set of moral constraints apply in Zynga's case. They aren't trying to prove themselves to some 3rd party. The whole point of Zynga is to make money for the people who own and work at Zynga. And apparently duplicating other people's games is working pretty well as a way of meeting that objective. There's definitely nothing noble about what they're doing. And I don't know how much effort they are putting in, but certainly seem to be doing what they are doing (which is distributing games, not producing innovative games) better than everyone else.

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That's one purpose of a thesis. The more significant purpose -- at least at a graduate level -- is to contribute to the sum of human knowledge. When academics are rewarded based on how many papers they've published in which journals, that's an attempt to quantify the value they've added to the system. Allowing plagiarism prevents assigning proper credit for original work, as well as lowering the total output of the system. Likewise, I think a lot of the outrage comes from the perception that the small developer is providing most of the value, but Zynga is getting most of the profit; not only is this unfair, but it discourages small companies from trying innovative new ideas, and the industry is poorer as a result.

Of course, it's entirely possible that the concept and design of these games is totally interchangeable, and the real value is in the marketing and analytics that Zynga does so well, which shoots that analogy right in the foot.

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Not sure why this is downvoted. I think it's probably right.

I get randomly selected for the bomb test almost 100% of the time in Australia. I don't think there is anything about me that is being discriminated against (typical white male).

I think they just screen a high percentage of people. Also, I think the longer you hang around after the x-ray (repacking your bag, getting dressed, etc), the more likely they are to approach you.

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Even if it there was a 50% chance of being picked, to have it happen (I've been counting) 8 times in a row so far is highly, unlikely -- 3 in a thousand. At 10% we're talking millions-to-1 that it's purely random.

I just don't buy it. Humans are involved. Humans are not cryptographic-grade RNGs.

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You're either very lucky, go through security at quieter times or self-selecting (subconsciously) by choosing the optimum time for you to be chosen.

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Airports bunch flights together so they can cut costs. It's always busy. As for "self-selecting the optimum time", I don't have to. I can self-select an interesting beard.

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Canberra by any chance? Much, much heavier screening there.

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There is an unstable mode in some aircraft (maybe only small aircraft?) where it enters into a kind of spiral dive. When you are sat in a plane where that is happening (I have done this in a training exercise) you really cannot feel anything unusual at first - the forces you experience from the different accelerations cancel out. Until all of a sudden you do feel it - at that point you are pitched with the wings at about 45 degrees and the nose pointing about 45 degrees towards the ground. Suddenly you feel it a lot. That is a very scary experience, and one of the reasons to ignore your body if you are a pilot.

When I experienced it it was in clear skies, so it would be rather obvious that it was happening just by looking out of the window, but apparently this can happen to inexperienced pilots in clouds.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graveyard_spiral

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If everyone used UTC you'd still have many of the same problems, just in reverse. For example, you can reasonably guess that in any country, an office will be staffed on weekdays from roughly 9-5 local time. If we all operated on UTC, then you'd need to look up in a big table what times the Sydney office operated.

It is useful to have a shared understanding of where in the day you expect an event to happen. E.g. 1pm is going to be around lunchtime whether you are in Sydney or New York.

Also, dates have exactly the same problems as time zones - the date starts at midnight local time. If lcoal time changes, then for part of the day, so does the date.

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