Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | ssmall's comments login

I just downloaded it because its been bogging down my machine. Its running notably smoother and quicker but I've got a regression on how its rendering the document I'm working from. Whats really stinks, its an internal document so I can't send it upstream so they can fix the issue.

The rendering bugs with Microsoft formats are understandable but still extremely frustrating.

-----


So whenever people ask me about Go, I try and get them to keep in mind this isn't meant to be a competitor to python/ruby or any of that. Approach it from the mindset of a C guy and it will look amazing. The biggest benefits over python/ruby are static typing and that it is compiled. I know static typing isn't popular around here but it has its benefits. I love go and I know web programming is possible in it, but I'd never use it for that. To me it shines at system level services, embedded linux, and anything with high performances and reliability requirements without real time requirements.

We were actually having a talk today about using it here on an embedded Linux device we produce. I'm not very confident anything will come of it but I think it would be a good fit.

-----


Indeed. There's been so much focus on interpreted langauges these days, compiled languages seem to be all but forgotten. C++ is the last new compiled language that's caught on. (There are others, like D, which are hanging in there, but don't seem to be gaining ground.) Go seems to have potential to grow into a successful compiled language.

-----


While I share your point of view, being a bit pedatic, I would like to note that most JVM and .NET languages are also compiled.

-----


Compiling to a virtual machine is only one step up from byte-compiling, which hardly counts. Calling a tail a leg doesn't make it one.

-----


Microsoft .NET always JITs the code, there is no VM bytecodes being executed on runtime. If you prefer you can AOT your application with NGEN.

Mono also offers the possibility to fully AOT your .NET application.

Most Java VMs can be made to fully JIT the code, bypassing any interpretation with flags similar to -XX:CompileThreshold in Hotspots' case.

If you prefer compile Java directly to native code, you can make use of gcj, Aonix Perc or Excelsior JET.

Language != Implementation

-----


  >  The biggest benefits over python/ruby are static typing and that it is compiled.
I find channels, interfaces, and attaching functions to data (as apposed to attaching methods and data to objects) rather compelling features personally.

-----


If I'm not mistaken, ruby and python both offer similar ideas. I've only used both passingly

-----


Not to be a jerk and I'm no expert in ruby (or much python for that matter), I don't think they do, at all really. At least no go-style interfaces or channels.

-----


Not all of us run Windows. I used Linux through my whole degree. Luckily my CS program was very good about very rarely requiring closed source or windows only software. There was only once, for some software engineering course, that I had to go down to the lab and use their machines. I think the homework was required to be done in Visio or something like that.

-----


Definitely see your point. During my time in college I only used Linux also. Now I work for a niche company where using C# allows us to get a lot done very quickly for the size of the company, and it's efficiency for getting stuff done is amazing. I love how great it is for completing stuff, but does suck not being able to use on any platform.

That being said unless it's just a quick hack for myself I tend to stray from C# due to it not being usable on all platforms.

-----


I really like the blog and its my go to site for legal software news and I don't think there is some kind of higher power backing it but I'm still very careful with everything I read there. I haven't seen any evidence of corporate backing, but there is no attempt to hide bias. Its definitely far from an objective news source.

-----


What bias? You may be confusing bias with opinion. "Equal time" is not unbiased reporting, and having a clear opinion is not bias, unless your opinion turns out to be consistently wrong.

-----


The editorializing gets tiresome when I just want to find out what happened during the trial. It feels like reading the Daily Mail; you can get actual news from there, but you have to be constantly on your guard against osmosing their opinions.

-----


> Its definitely far from an objective news source.

Let me know when you find one.

-----


Whoa, I didn't know about being able to import packages from a URL. That is pretty slick.

-----


It is quite neat and mighty convenient, but I sorta live in fear that at some arbitrary point the library will change and my code will just stop working. I konw this isn't a problem unique to Go and there are solutions, but the lack of explicit versioning makes me nervous. Then again, it hasn't bit me yet, and I certainly have benefitted from the ease.

-----


I think it works out pretty well- if you're working on a Very Serious Project(TM), you point it at a URL that's your project's closely managed fork.

-----


it doesn't "compile from a url", the package name is just the url address. You still have a directory of downloaded packages analogous to Python's site-packages, and they don't update unless you explicitly update them. The difference is that if you say `go get github.com/whatever/foo` the package source will be downloaded to a location such as `/usr/local/go/src/pkg/github.com/whatever/foo`.

-----


One solution is to add version to url. Some examples from Google API for Golang (http://code.google.com/p/google-api-go-client/): code.google.com/p/google-api-go-client/tasks/v1 code.google.com/p/google-api-go-client/books/v1

-----


This is absolutely the only right way to do this. It's very unsettling that locking to a specific revision isn't considered the default.

Depending on git master is cowboy coding at its most cavalier; build systems should prize repeatability above all else.

-----


If you'r really worried about code changes that might break your project, you're free to fork the library, e.g. if it's on GitHub. Even though that's not really a sophisticated way of versioning, it's quite convenient.

-----


There are a few things that can be done:

1. Hope that the projects you depend on have a tag that you can reference as your import or that you can acquire specifically with `go get`

2. Fork them and keep track of them yourself.

3. Use the tool (I can't find the link) that manages version dependencies per-project so that you can have different versions for different projects based on your needs (think virutalenv).

-----


I looked but didn't see it listed any where. Any android support?

-----


Sorry, we've just got the iPhone app. Android is in our future plans.

-----


Its disappointing in the short term, but look at the big picture. All this extra interest and purchases from the private sector if handled correctly will let them buy in bigger bulks, twist more arms in manufacturing, and find and fix more bugs. In the long run getting this boards out to a wider audience will give you a more stable, feature-rich and cheaper product.

-----


I hope that will be the case. My ultimate motivation is to get students interested in programming and all the other things (control tech, etc) a cheap expendable PC can facilitate. I could easily get 20 of these if they were available but getting one is tricky enough at the moment.

-----


They talked a fair amount about it on Marketplace, a public radio show about business and economics. Still isn't exactly mainstream but its outside the tech news circle.

-----


Just because those didn't come with threats doesn't mean all attacks come without threats. Also it doesn't prove that all threats won't be followed by an attack.

The unibomber is one example. He would send mail bombs if newspapers didn't heed his threats and publish his ramblings.

-----


Again? Didn't they get all their servers seized back in the late 90s early 00's too?

-----


I want to say that they had servers seized running up to the 2004 Republican convention in Minnesota. However, I'm having a hard time finding news links about this.

I also went to check their wikipedia page to see if there was a history section, and Riseup doesn't seem to have one.

Now I'm going to go soothe my paranoia.....

-----


If I remember correctly... it was because they were offering free hosting to political groups and someone was using it to host bomb plans without them knowing.

I'm sure the time I'm thinking of had to have been before 2004 because I remember not even having a drivers license at the time.

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Security | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Apply to YC | Contact

Search: