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Does anyone know of any statistics that show people in the tech industry by age? In other words, I wonder if the sheer number of older people "in tech" is just dwarfed by young people who have been in it all along (As opposed to a career change by a mid-career older person). Also, since the tech industry has grown so exponentially, the number people in the industry in and of itself has expanded to greatly include younger people (versus existing, older people who choose to switch into the field).

This is to say that I wonder if people older than 40 or older than 50 are truly underrepresented in tech because of age discrimination or is it because there is, quite literally, not that many of them in tech to begin with?

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I agree especially with respect to the secrecy surrounding this whole thing. But which leadership of which countries? Who, to be specific?

And which select corporation's interests?

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Of course, if outside entities got ahold of any of them, what actually stops them from using it?

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The patent cooperation treaty. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patent_Cooperation_Treaty

But just for fun... Having a patent doesn't protect how my invention works, just how my invention is used. If someone lives in Pineland and wants to use a patent I filed for nothing is really stopping him. Regardless if my patent is free to use or not.

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Regarding #5, that simply just doesn't make sense. There are "best agents" who spend most of their time buying and selling in homes in the 250K-500K range because they have a knack for doing it efficiently and in volume. It is a huge mistake to think that just because an agent only deals in "luxury homes" that they are a better or more capable agent than one who does volume in lower-priced homes.

As well, buyers and sellers in the luxury market are also more challenging to deal with because of very specific parameters and various exceptions that make doing deals more specialized (i.e. it is more difficult to compare House A to House B when both are $2.5MM each).

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This is a massive lack of imagination. I highly doubt the only motivation from Amazon's perspective is strictly about cost-cutting. On its surface, yes, it would be easy to assume this could result in some odd or lesser version of having a major courier deliver your package.

On the other hand, by having Amazon control the to-the-door experience, that gives them incredible granular controls over how things are done, when, by whom, and how they do it, including how they are supposed to treat you at the door (if you're there), what to say, etc. etc. As well as any additional things that could come in the future.

For example, what about a 5-minute tutorial for a new product you just ordered?

These are just the tip of the iceberg that Amazon could do with this.

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> This is a massive lack of imagination. I highly doubt the only motivation from Amazon's perspective is strictly about cost-cutting.

> For example, what about a 5-minute tutorial for a new product you just ordered?

I highly doubt people who are essentially doing low-wage contract piecework will have the motivation or ability to give me an effective 5 minute tutorial on the random gizmo I just researched and ordered. When would they learn that stuff, on the drive to my house?

Also, wasn't there a big story a few years ago about how Amazons treats many of their low-skill workers as easily replaceable automatons (many of which are now being replaced by literal automatons)? I can't see this as being much different.

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While I certainly can't prove your comments any other way, my point isn't to declare that I somehow know what Amazon is going to do with this, rather that there are a lot of interesting possibilities when you control the whole process, including the final delivery step of getting a product to the actual customer. There are things you just can't do when you are contracting that through a normal courier (UPS, FedEx, USPS, etc etc.).

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There is a lot of potential value in white-glove services, yes. It's also something most people aren't all that interested in paying a reasonable amount for.

Think for a minute about the cost of sending someone trained out for a five-minute introductory session when a given gizmo is delivered. Think about the training required. Think about all the additional delivery complications this introduces. And so on.

There's value here, but it's not easy to realize. Places like Best Buy offer it through Geek Squad, but only in conjunction with a B&M service.

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> It's also something most people aren't all that interested in paying a reasonable amount for.

That's me! I have 0 interest in it. I just want the stuff on my doorstep when I get home and a way to address if it hasn't been delivered. Neither of these require a white-glove service I don't want to pay for.

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> On the other hand, by having Amazon control the to-the-door experience, that gives them incredible granular controls over how things are done, when, by whom, and how they do it, including how they are supposed to treat you at the door (if you're there), what to say, etc. etc.

You can't exert control (e.g. uniforms, greetings, etc.) over independent contractors, so Amazon would not be able to do any of this under their current model.

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> You can't exert control (e.g. uniforms, greetings, etc.) over independent contractors, so Amazon would not be able to do any of this under their current model.

You can, but the degree, nature, and scope of such control will be part of any analysis as to whether they are bona fide independent contractors, or actually employees where you are trying to evade requirements of employment law.

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> You can't exert control (e.g. uniforms, greetings, etc.) over independent contractors

That's false as a matter of fact.

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Are you at all following Uber's legal issues?

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I hope they remember the world exists outside of the US and UK - Australia seriously needs some delivery competition between AusPost, StarTrack (owned by AusPost) and Toll. I'm sure I'm forgetting a few, but Australians buy a lot of stuff online [1].

AusPost won't accept anything but their own parcels / other national carriers (i.e. USPS but not UPS) into their parcel locker system, so it's a complete crapshoot whether your Amazon parcel is going to go around the world again.

Toll have tried to emulate this with their ParcelPoint system but there just aren't as many locations.

Amazon could seriously shake things up by launching Flex plus Lockers at the same time here. Flex would cover the rural areas quite well where the nearest courier depot is 1+ hours away (or more in WA, I'm sure)

1: http://auspost.com.au/annualreport2014/parcel-services.html but declining because our economy relies heavily on digging stuff up and selling it to China.

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That [currently] is not Zenefits' business model. Their entire premise is that you can practically use any providers you want for your benefits such as various 401K providers, various health care plans, etc., as well as any payroll vendor. Zenefits makes its money as a broker when you choose to go through Zenefits to get things such as payroll or benefits administration services. But the key is that Zenefits itself is not providing the said services. They are paid on commission or rev. share with the providers that ultimately service Zenefits customers.

While they could become a payroll provider themselves, that isn't really their mission. As well, it's not so trivial to write some software "over the weekend" and have a solid payroll system. While payroll companies actually have very little regulation (this is true, and somewhat surprising), it is complex to build a payroll system that can accommodate all the various needs of clients. Just to name a few things to get started: Hourly, salary, pay cycles, 1099, fed/state/local taxes and tax codes and rates, time off tracking, punch in/punch out, check printing and electronic deposit, paper and electronic tax filing, tax payments, garnishments, time off tracking, pre/post-tax deductions, worker's compensation rates, union dues, and the list just goes on from there.

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What about asking for someone's prior compensation after you've hired them?

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There are almost certainly rules/stipulations around the money that was taken off the table by the founders in their funding round. It most certainly was tied to vested equity, at an absolute minimum, rather than granted as something such as a one-time bonus with no strings attached.

I would be surprised if the founders get to contractually retain the entire $3MM taken off the table in that funding round. It is possible that this is the case (and so maybe not so surprising) but given the often unique terms in startup funding, I would be surprised if this were the case here.

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I'm surprised no one has yet mentioned CarMax. I won't argue as to whether CarMax is best or not but I can attest that it is a very straight-forward, no-haggle, and pretty fair-priced way to buy a car. Even if you don't feel they are best-priced, you definitely will 100% avoid all of the anxiety and nerve-wrackiness that comes with going into traditional dealerships. That alone might be worth a slightly inflated price to avoid that experience anyways.

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True and they will ship cars around their lots for you. That said, you pay for it if you don't end up purchasing the car but I think it opens up a lot of inventory to sift through.

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What were the specifics of the stock shenanigans?

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