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Dane here: only persons in trusted jobs (police, hospitals, etc) can look up a persons address. The avarage citizen cannot!

Denmark has much stricter laws for privacy than USA: Companies are not allowed to sell your address or phone number to other companies. So Danes don't mind giving Blockbuster their address because they know it won't be sold to 3rd party.

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Really? I'm Dutch but lived in Denmark for a while. I gave CBB (a telco) my CPR number on the signup form and poof they had all my data. Impressive UX, but it scared the hell out of me.

Also a Danish social security card (the kind you show to doctors or hospitals, so you take it everywhere) contains your full address and the CPR number. Handy if someone finds your wallet, so they can bring it back. Unless of course they want to screw you over, because all relevant personal info is on that single card.

If you find a Dane's wallet, you can basically do any kind of business on their behalf that doesn't require showing a picture ID.

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> I gave CBB (a telco) my CPR number on the signup form and poof they had all my data.

That is correct. Unless your address is "protected" a large number of companies with access to CPR can look up your address. No privacy to speak of there.

Yes, the Danish social security card contains the CPR number (SSN).

A big (huge) problem in Denmark has been created as an unintended consequence about fear of "having a number assigned" to you. As a result of much debate in the 1960-70's, the compromise was to designate the CPR number as "confidential". Which was really, really stupid in the first case because 6 digits out of 10 is your birth date, one is a check digit, so in reality you have very, very limited entropy.

But worse, because many confused confidential with secret, misguided companies (and authorities) started using it as an authentication method. The logic being that since 3rd parties were not supposed to know the "secret", proving this knowledge was taken as proof that you were who you claimed to be.

Even today, it is amazing what you are allowed to do with a CPR number. So yes, it is foobar.

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> One nibble for the foreground colour, one for background.

No, 3 bits for foreground, 3 bits for background, 1 bit for extra brightness and 1 bit for blink (swaps bg/fg every second).

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Oops sorry, I remembered the brightness bit but forgot it was for both colors at the same time. Ahhh yes and the flash bit :) thanks. The final piece of the video output was the border color (on one of the out ports of the z80). By syncing with the vertical retrace you could 'draw' into the border (most tape loading routines changed the border color as bits were read from the tape to give the familiar border stripes when games loaded from tape).

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Ditto for Denmark: https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=www.netbank.n...

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I'm surprised they placed one in Denmark since Netherlands and West-Germany (ie near Düsseldorf) would be much more central Europe for internet connections.

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Maybe, because Denmark has a huge supply of wind energy?

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Actually I believe Apple is going for a long term renewable energy strategy like Amazon, Google and Microsoft. The additional electricity from wind(and maybe solar) can also be sold into the danish/European energy market.

The big picture I see, is that if you look at the Nordic countries, you see that Finland and Sweden has several (unpopular)nuclear power plants. Denmark has a mix of everything, mostly coal and wind. And Norway get most of its electricity from hydro.

Google has built a data center in Finland, Facebook in Sweden and now Apple will build one in Denmark. And I also believe Microsoft is building a data center in Finland.

But few are considering Norway and that may be because electricity in Norway is already very cheap and neither wind or solar can compete with hydro. And you want additional profit by selling energy to the energy market.

Selling electricity is a good sustainable long term investment.

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There's wind and other renewables (wave/tide) in Denmark, but 48 % of electricity production is coal, so that's the marginal increase of production that Apple [edit: not Google] is actually going to use.

BTW, in Finland nuclear isn't that unpopular, there's currently a new site under construction.

(There is some trouble building it up, though: because the opponents of nuclear power will put just as much resistance to a site regardless of whether it is a 160 MW or 1600 MW plant, the planners make the site as big as possible, and the suppliers (in this case Areva) haven't considered this in the technology. The local nuclear safety authority is also ultra-safety-conscious, which is good in itself, except when slows down the deployment of a new, quite safe site so that the energy is bought off a Chernobyl-type thing near Leningrad).

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It's flown under the radar, but Apple has gone big on renewable energy for datacenters since 2013. Idk why I sat on this article but I finally submitted today:

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=9093657

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That might have a role, indeed. Denmark announced a few years ago that it intends to go 100 percent renewable over the next few decades (I think by 2040 or something).

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Plus Denmark is able to buffer their unreliable wind energy with Swedish nuclear and hydro so even when the mills aren't turning they can import power to offset their coal when they're making green claims.

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The Danish center will be right next to the substation that receives hydro power from Norway.

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Might also be for economic/financial reasons. Denmark (unlike Germany and Holland) is not in the eurozone and also the German economy is looking like its getting a little bit unstable lately.

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It's a lot easier with a 5 year window for PostgreSQL: Kernel developers have to support all kinds of weird semi-buggy hardware that they can't buy in their country, they have to make the kernel work with badly written GPU drivers , and they have to deal with interrupt-level code which is notoriously difficult to debug.

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The author's primary example for the "LTS is bad claim" was glibc, which is not a kernel.

Are you saying the "LTS is bad claim" only applies to kernels and other things very close to the hardware (closer than a database)?

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The perl developers greatly underestimated the importance of syntactic sugar and familiarity. (Java was helped a lot by looking like C).

PHP was much more friendly towards new programmers than Perl 5, it was so much easier to make simple web pages. So it took over. It didn't matter that Perl 5 was more advanced.

(oh, you uploaded module to same dir and didn't remember to add something to @INC)

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> The perl developers greatly underestimated the importance of syntactic sugar and familiarity.

I don't think that's the case. The problem is that the generation of tools that have stuff in common with perl (awk, sed, shell) are completely unfamiliar to programmers which started programming in the last 15 years, compared to those that started 30 years ago.

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Look at how much boilerplate code you need in Perl 5 to create a class versus C++/Java's simple class MyClass { }

You need to assign to a variable named @ISA, you need to return 1; at the bottom of the file. And 'public' members have to be listed in the EXPORT variable.

It is really funny that Perl 5 OO need more boilerplate code than Java!

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A small correction there, you aren't making them public by putting them in EXPORT. What you're doing is actually using another module to munge the namespace that used your class. In fact by default all functions defined in a package that is used as a class are public by default.

And here's the boiler plate for more modern perl:

    package MyClass;
    use Moose;
    1;
You can define properties of the class using has 'property'; This will setup any accessors and also handle initializing them in the constructor that's created for you by default.

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Why do you need to return 1 though? That seems pretty ridiculous.

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Because that's how [require](http://p3rl.org/require) works:

> to indicate successful execution of any initialization code

Other dynamic languages have problems with "half"-loaded code. This mechanism is a defense against that.

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It has uses. Sometimes you can also use it to write code that runs like a script if called in script mode (what some people are calling a modulino. If you really hate it there's a number of packages on CPAN to make it disappear.

Also new versions of Perl allow you to define a package scope and skip the '1;' Most Perl programmers don't use this yet since the benefit is very small and the cost is losing some back compatibility. Maybe in a few years it will be more common:

package MyApp::Web { ... }

Like a lot of things in Perl it has a use that might not be immediately evident. Its also possible a more elegant solution could have been found as well. Generally when I write real code I never notice it (the 1; is drowned out by docs and real code.

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Technically, you don't need to return 1; you need to return a truthy value. The string "Perl syntax is dumb and hateful" works just as well.

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What? I'm not a PERL programmer - I used it a bit before it grew OO features, roughly at the same time I used Turbo Pascal, so really long ago. Yet, in these examples: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1037312/how-do-i-create-a... I see no boilerplate you speak of. If you look at this http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1037312/how-do-i-create-a... answer you'll see comparison to C++, which isn't exactly in the favour of the latter in terms of conciseness.

And then, even if it was true and you really needed to "add public methods to EXPORT variable" that's no different than modern JavaScript, right? That's how modules work in JS. Having to "return" something at the end of a module is a requirement in Lua, too - again, it's just how the module system works.

Anyway, I don't know PERL, but knowing many other languages I find your claims suspicious. It reads as if you were a recent Java convert who tries to rationalize his decision to leave PERL or something like that.

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"public static void" is more boilerplate per method than Perl has per module.

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You know, that's actually really insightful. I never bothered to learn awk, sed and shell because Perl did it all under one roof. I can only imagine moving from that mess to Perl must have seemed like a revelation to those that came before me, while Perl 5 to Perl 6 is less obvious.

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The american authors did not write enough stores to fill the demand in Denmark so the Danish publisher had to write additional stories for the weekly magazine in Denmark.

http://www.b.dk/kultur/danskere-laver-anders-and-til-hele-ve...

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Experience from Denmark: when public institutions make it-systems they almost always fail.

The "exam submission system" for primary schools failed completely the first two times when the pupils was sitting the exam.

The police completely cancelled their new it-system after spending $90 million.

etc.

So when the (Danish) public sector makes stuff that's worse than BLACKBOARD, it might for the time being be the least of the evils to outsource it to the private sector.

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FBI had a camera installed above the dining-room table. They might have seen him typing the password.

Snowden is more professional: he puts a blanket over his head and computer when typing a password.

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Both of the methods on the page are easy to optimize out. GCC does optimize the first version out.

These methods are not safe and they do not ensure that the compiler doesn't optimize out a call to bzero.

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I guess you are right. 10+ years ago that made the trick :)

Probably there is some declspec/attribute for it.

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