Hacker Newsnew | comments | show | ask | jobs | submit | login

A course (lightly)based on HtDP is also starting in Coursera in a few days- https://www.coursera.org/course/programdesign. It uses Racket and the first two weeks of videos are already up so you can preview them.

-----


The first two weeks' lectures are already up.

-----


Probably to reduce some friction from the process. They also don't charge a transaction fee(as noted in another comment), so i could see myself using this on my site.

Of course a much useful service would be something like flattr. IIRC, There was some talk about them starting to accept bitcoins but i haven't heard about that lately.

-----


This looks really great. Silly question: is there any way to access localhost from other devices on my WLAN?

-----


No, not localhost. But you can make the built-in debugging server bind to all IP addresses, including the one used on your WLAN.

In backend/local_server.py, change the line that says:

    app.run()
to instead read:

    app.run(host='0.0.0.0')
You should then be able to access the server at the WLAN IP address of your machine, provided port 5000 is opened by your firewall.

Even better, however, would be to use uwsgi in standalone mode. I've updated the README with instructions on this.

-----


Maybe a "painful problems" spreadsheet would be more appropriate.

This reminds me of something Paul Graham called "sitcom startup ideas" in a recent post.

-----


I'm not necessarily sure why anybody in their right mind would create such a thing and share it! Ideas are less valuable than execution, but ideas are valuable nonetheless!

People should really be solving their own painful problems anyway (always better to be your own customer!) whose solutions can in some way be successfully and profitably exchanged for money.

-----


> I'm not necessarily sure why anybody in their right mind would create such a thing and share it!

Best startup ideas are about solving real problems. Some people care about problems getting solved, whether or not they are the ones doing the solving. Keep in mind that no one has enough time to try and solve all the problems at once. So if you see something wrong that needs to be fixed, and you don't have time to do it yourself (because you're busy fixing something else), why not just share it with people, so that someone else might work on it, thus helping to make our world a better place?

-----


That's reasonable however I've always been of the opinion that it's better to solve a problem when you have the problem and are feeling the pain, rather than implementing someone's idea in the abstract. It always seems that the people who are really solving their own painful problems capture a market.

Maybe other people are better at implementing someone else's idea than me and I'm just viewing the world through Matt-colored glasses.

-----


Some exercises work better collaboratively.

-----


I highly support something like that. At some point I even wanted to create a listing website where people can submit "pain points" for others to solve. A "Pain Point Directory".

-----


conspiracy theory

What if this is the writers of that new Silicon Valley comedy show soliciting ideas for their characters w/o having to pay writers!?

-----


If they are not behind it, we should still send them this link. They could certainly make use of some of those ideas, maybe with a little bit of twist here and there to make them more comic. I doubt writers could get better startup ideas than actual SV people and SV-wannabies :).

-----


In the original thread I made the joke that they don't really need writers, just a bot that reads popular HN blogspam all day.

Sad thing is it's true.

-----


I agree. I'm doing the same course and because I couldn't get their implementation of Scheme(ucb-scheme) to work, I'm really out-of-sync with the course.

I'm doing the examples and exercises in Racket.

-----


Are you taking 61as, the self-paced version? I was under the impression they were either already using, or planning to switch to, a JavaScript Scheme implementation to ease just this sort of problem.

I know one of he people who is running 61as, and I believe he wants to move as much as possible into the browser. In fact, they might even use a JavaScript-based Emacs clone instead of Emacs proper next time.

I think using the browser should make setting up the environment much easier than using some old, unsupported Scheme implementation!

-----


No, I'm watching the 61A videos on Youtube.

I'll need to check out the Javascript based implementation sometime. But it is really annoying that the course is using something that hasn't been updated in ages.

-----


I'm in AS. We aren't using a js interpreter and actually I haven't seen them mention such a switch much. That's news to me.

-----


In that case, I think that's what they're going to be working on over winter break for the next iteration of the class. At the very least, I'm sure it's a possiblity; there's obviously no guarantee that it is practical or will get done.

I think it's a good idea, personally. It could also make many of the assignments more interactive.

-----


Are you having trouble because you're running a different platform that they developed their implementation on?

If so my way of dealing with this when I'm too lazy to deal with trying to get stuff to work on another system, is to using something like Virtual Box and work on the exact OS the library/language I want to work with was made for.

-----


No, I'm using Linux(Arch) so I guess I am on an intended platform. It is on the user contributed repos but the installation didn't work. I tried installing just stk-scheme too but that didn't work either.

-----


Can you try stk-simply?

-----


I think the Python Software Foundation was asking for redesign proposals for the Python site a while ago; so we might see some improvements for the Python site. I don't find the Python site particularly ugly, but I think the docs could improve a lot. Same goes for a lot of other python frameworks that use the default Sphinx template.

-----


> Have you thought about doing this for RSS as well?

I'll consider this idea.

-----


Steve Losh is doing a series about making a roguelike in clojure actually- http://stevelosh.com/blog/2012/07/caves-of-clojure-01/ You might find those useful.

-----


I found your post on Twitter and found it pretty useful, mostly because I'm reading the same book as you are(Clojure Programming) and was having some difficulty groking this program. Your post really helped.

There is a typo in line 8, I think it should have been (range h).

-----


There was a typo indeed, thanks for pointing it out. Could you link me to that tweet?

-----


This one- https://twitter.com/magopian/status/239970727300849664

-----


I'm not really much experienced, but I've played around with Noir and its really similar to Flask. You could try out Compojure too, on which Noir is based(even more minimalistic).

Right now, I'm following some Noir tutorials here: http://yogthos.net/

-----

More

Guidelines | FAQ | Support | API | Lists | Bookmarklet | DMCA | Y Combinator | Apply | Contact

Search: