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Yup, see for example: http://science.tumblr.com/post/13853183116/the-big-five-pers...

Take note that the Big five, the other major personality typology, though more empirical, is not without problems either. http://differentialclub.wdfiles.com/local--files/personality...

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saint-loup 192 days ago | link | parent | on: Hostnames

There's even a website collecting naming schemes. http://namingschemes.com/

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And yet, Neal Stephenson made an interesting distinction between "geeking out" and "vegging out":

"To geek out on something means to immerse yourself in its details to an extent that is distinctly abnormal - and to have a good time doing it. To veg out, by contrast, means to enter a passive state and allow sounds and images to wash over you without troubling yourself too much about what it all means."

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/17/opinion/17stephenson.html?...

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"Induced demand, or latent demand, is the phenomenon that after supply increases, more of a good is consumed." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induced_demand

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Google is publishing data on the quality of operators: https://www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=e9krd11m38onf_&...

Besides, one nitpick: the Google News story was in Belgium, not in France.

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jeroen 268 days ago | link

Actually, both:

Belgium http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-12-13/google-belgian-news...

France http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-21302168

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>> Week Eight: Quantum Logic (orthocomplemented lattices, projections, Gleason's Theorem, probability and logic).

Naive question: wasn't quantum logic a somewhat failed endeavour and a thing of the past?

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bobwaycott 271 days ago | link

It is not a failed philosophical endeavor, and there are still philosophers engaged in the field. It had an early period beginning in the 1930s, and another strong period from the '50s-70s. It has been helpful to the understanding and development of probability theory, and continues to be applied and investigated, including in current scientific experimentation.

The rise of quantum computing has created another contemporary dimension to the field.

As it is, it grapples with properly understanding and formulating logic and correct perceptions and descriptions of the world by building on classical logic in light of developments in quantum mechanics. I doubt we'll see it 'fail' and fade into obscurity anytime soon. It's not exactly Cartesian philosophy.

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chrisdevereux 271 days ago | link

Nitpick: Cartesian philosophy might be obscure, but I don't think it's a failed theory in the sense that, say, the phlogiston theory of combustion is a failed theory.

Even if it was ultimately discarded by philosophers, it allowed the modern field of epistemology to develop (which wouldn't have really been possible previously), and (arguably) contributed to the development of physics by excluding our mental vocabulary (thoughts, experiences, beliefs, etc.) from the study of the physical world. At the expense of our ability to understand said mental vocabulary perhaps, but an improvement on what had been thought previously.

I'd compare it to how a particular module in a program might be important for some time, since it provides some basic functionality that is required in order to develop the rest of the program, but that after some time is no longer needed and refactored out in favour of something more sophisticated.

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bobwaycott 271 days ago | link

Of course, and my apologies because I was unclear with my language. I was using Cartesianism as an example of faded, not failed, philosophical field. That was rather foolish of me to word it so lazily. Thanks for the nitpick and pointing out all the great things that resulted.

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Jimmy 271 days ago | link

And Cartesian dualism is still alive with some philosophers... ideas don't die easily.

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chrisdevereux 271 days ago | link

Cartesian dualism (aka substance dualism, the idea that mind and body are distinct objects) isn't particularly popular in mainstream philosophy. Property dualism on the other hand (the idea that eg., mental states and physical states can't be fully explained in terms of each other, but that people possess both) is quite popular.

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I concur. His notebook is a wonder of great resources on many (many many) subjects, with often interesting comments. http://vserver1.cscs.lsa.umich.edu/~crshalizi/notabene/

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I use Windows at the office and my work doesn't need me to have 300 tabs open at once. So I keep lauching and closing Firefox.

Start-up time matters, thanks.

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rschmitty 295 days ago | link

Why do you close it? I also use windows, never have more tabs than I can read their titles, and never close Firefox (except when some js crashes it, like browserstack.com)

Firefox is my browsing (err) browser (I like tag bookmarks too much).

I use chrome to develop with as I like their tools much better than firebug which, to me, is very slow in comparison. Chrome I close out relaunch semi-frequently (crtl-w spam, oops), but still keep it open, because why not?

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saint-loup 295 days ago | link

Because when I close the one tab left, Firefox closes itself. Thanks to the fast launch time, I don't bother to keeping one open.

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shardling 295 days ago | link

Note for anyone confused: this is not true on a Mac; in general it depends on what the OS's convention is.

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ygra 295 days ago | link

Firefox doesn't do that on Windows either for me. I had to use a small extension by a friend to enable that.

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silverwind 294 days ago | link

browser.tabs.closeWindowWithLastTab = false should fix that.

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WayneDB 295 days ago | link

I close what I'm working on when I'm done working on it. I don't like clutter. Simple as that.

Of course, I also work in an operating environment that generally doesn't leave desktop programs running after I close the last window. So, it just happens naturally when I close a window.

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saint-loup 329 days ago | link | parent | on: A new Gmail inbox

That's what the Gmail Labs is for: testing features before some of them being released to everyone.

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bound008 328 days ago | link

Google Labs is a place where they incubate awesome ideas and features. Then they launch it into the main project and people hate it. Then they kill it.

I would rather they just left it in labs.

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zobzu 328 days ago | link

Oh you mean like when we could enable features we like and disable the ones we don't like? You mean, the 90's!

Nowadays the corporations make all the choices for you. They know what's good for you, better than you do. Maybe.

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likeclockwork 328 days ago | link

One size fits all.

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intrazoo 329 days ago | link

You would hardly know how the typical consumer is going to use/like it from that data though (not that I do not agree that that might be a good idea, maybe they just want to get it out soon).

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pilsetnieks 329 days ago | link

It's not necessarily about users liking them as much as just getting the features out before as many eyeballs and browser/system combos as possible before introducing them to the whole world.

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BallinBige 328 days ago | link

google labs is fun for a minute

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I'm sorry, but why would you put something like this in your CSS:

    text-shadow: 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,.5);
It makes the text blurred and jarring.

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stavrianos 412 days ago | link

Perhaps an attempt to force/fake font smoothing?

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