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The bubble started long ago.

This is what happens when you have lots of extra money floating around and traditional investments aren't producing results that can beat inflation.

People have been shoveling large amounts of money into tech for way too long, and even last year WhatsApp was sold for ~20 billion USD.

We've now past that and are now at a point where we're going to pump that bubble up even further.

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#7 is arguably even the most important.

If only administrators and those above them would be made to understand that there is more to child development than standardized test scores.

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My reaction was the opposite. Of course well-being is important, but it's a state isn't it? How do you learn it, or teach it? It sounds perilously close to the whole "self-esteem" thing that became prominent in elementary schools a few years back. As if self-esteem was not something developed through accomplishment and the subsequent increase in self-confidence, but rather a piece of information to be conveyed by an instructor. "Shazam! You now esteem yourself."

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You can absolutely teach it. At the age of 25 I think I'm only now beginning to understand the specific actions and skills that go into making your life a good one.

Skills like: coming up with ideas for ways to be kind to people, being truthful with myself and others, communicating my feelings and problems early and calmly (instead of too late and tearfully), eating well, keeping my environment clean, exercising enough, and managing my time by making sure I don't overcommit myself.

I definitely didn't do most of these things when I was in school - looking back, I can see the useless, arrogant teenager I was, and want to slap myself. But honestly, no one bothered to teach me these skills, except (kind of, in a confusingly packaged, disorganized way) in Sunday school.

I got the fundamental concepts of how to conduct myself properly by reading books, mostly fiction, and learned to apply them largely by observing adults for what NOT to do - it was also a long time before I learned to find good role models.

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Well-being is a complicated topic, which only drives home why we need to teach it to children. Not only in respect to self-worth and work ethic, but in terms of empathy, morality, and the ability to rationalize the world around them. If we can help children think about why they feel the way they do, it can clear up confusion about the emotions of everyday life and prevent anxiety. If we do not, they'll simply have a more and more complicated world to deal with as they grow up, without the tools to help them simplify it.

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Lots of people with impressive accomplishments don't have self-esteem. Impostor Syndrome, Dunning-Kruger etc. If you don't have self-esteem, you'll let yourself get pushed around because you think you're not really worth anything. But with it, you'll start to see your own potential, which is a good motivator to start working toward it.

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Self esteem is a double edged sword as it does not consider empathy and may lead to narcissistic values. That's the flaw with the self only aspect.

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It's a state, but you can learn quite a bit on how to get and maintain that state. Things like "ecstacy/sex/[whatever] works short term, but maybe you should see a therapist instead" isn't something that goes without saying. Lots of people take the wrong choice every day.

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Please don't say "#n is adjective..." without specifying what #n actually is. This is a clickbait trend that has ripped through social media spam lately and it's vastly annoying imo. If you're going to talk about the article, talk about it like a normal person, not a spammer trying to trick people into following the links.

#7 in this article is "well-being".

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I think he means it's one of those things that is assumed by the general public to be safe.

And I too would have never have thought about fetal ultrasounds being unsafe, had it not been for your post.

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Very good note about the goal price. To me, more than anything, that suggests that this was designed to be intentionally misleading.

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It's a common Kickstarter practice to set intentionally low goals. It makes the project seem more achievable to those pledging before the goal is met, it makes the project seem more successful mid-campaign as it exceeds the goal within a short time, and you can later brag to the press and potential customers about exceeding the target goal by hundreds of percents or more.

Look at all the successful projects of late, most of them adopted a certain Kickstarter formula in terms of goal, videos, page design, marketing language and so on. There's nothing casual about Kickstarter anymore, at least not in the big money campaign.

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Also, if they fail to reach their goal they get nothing. Outside funding is basically a given. They're likely just using Kickstarter as an extremely lenient pre-order service.

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Right, Kickstarter is more of a method of advertising than anything else at this point.

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I think he was referring to the technology, as in the hardware.

To do this stuff properly, you often need big expensive equipment, so the real question is what they are doing to achieve results using cheap hardware.

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It is probably very similar to how Ubisoft made Just Dance using the Wii controller. The Wii controller was really horrible in terms of what you could read from it, but if you stored what measurements you got from people dancing properly you could score people against that. Basically there was enough degrees of freedom to identify decent dancing to a degree and if you hid what was actually going on people bought it. Although it Wii-based Just Dance is horrible compared to the XBox version that used the Kinetic.

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My prediction. This will be one of a few stories, the media will be told to silence it, and the public won't care.

The most amount of outrage it will likely generate will be a rant by Jon Stewart which will draw laughter, but likely nothing more.

Does anyone have any suggestions about generating proper outrage about such a blatant violation of all of our rights?

If our representatives are being controlled by security apparatuses within the government, then that's the red flag of red flags.

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I think the lesson you were supposed to learn is "responsible disclosure"

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Disagree.

Let's say you are accused of robbing a convenience store. The police take the security footage, review it, and then erase it. According to everyone that saw the tape, you did it, and perhaps they even retain a few seconds of footage that shows something like a coat that you own.

Would you think it fair that one party gets to use evidence to convict you, that you yourself are not allowed to see, or use for your own defense?

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What if the police had to keep the convenience store closed until the trial? I believe that's a more accurate analogy.

The convenience store owner would be furious about the lost business from having to shutter the store for months or years, watching as formerly faithful customers just walk on by.

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Your analogy still does not resolve why only one party in the trial gets to see the evidence in its entirety before it is destroyed.

Why would the defense (i.e. the owner of the data) not have the same opportunity as the prosecution to review their own material?

The only counter-argument that I can see is that Mega should continue paying their hosting bills for as long as the government wants to drag the trial on for. Which very well was a possible intent from the start. In which case, the entire thing seems like a government strong-arm, of which I am not in favor.

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My point was to translate the lost opportunity costs of the data storage into more concrete terms. Im not trying to make any legal commentary.

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Leaseweb isn't closed. They just had to store some servers. They could just turn them off, put them in storage, then sue law enforcement or the DOJ equivalent for the opportunity cost and storage costs. That's not an accurate analogy at all.

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> then sue law enforcement or the DOJ equivalent for the opportunity cost and storage costs

Does suing the government ever actually work?

(Honest question, I'm not an American and I've only seen people try to sue in high-profile cases like PRISM, which never seems to get them anywhere)

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Yes, Henry Ford did it in the 1950's to recoup the losses after the Allies bombed his tank making factories in Nazi Germany and Axis controlled territory.

There are certain laws in place to keep people from willy-nilly suing the government, but there are situations where it is possible to sue them and sometimes even win. (not sure about this case in particular, anyone want to weigh in?)

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Do you have any source for this trial? I can't seem to find any trace of it when googling. Also Henry Ford died in 1947 and had cerebral issues before that, so if the trial did happen in the 50s it was either brought by his successors or Ford Motor Company.

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My mistake, I contributed factually inaccurate information. Thanks for the help!

"1946: Ford sues the allies for damages done to his factories in Dresden during the infamous bombing, and wins compensation."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Ford_Motor_Company </br> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bombing_of_Dresden_in_World_Wa...

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Yes this is done all the time.

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Turning them off might not be an option. Disks that are encrypted would them become unreadable when turned off.

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Disks that become unreadable when they lose power aren't called disks, they're called RAM.

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With which encryption software?

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GMemcachePG

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How many servers? How many HDDs? How much of Leaseweb's "digital floorspace" were they unable to use because of this case?

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According to this it was 630 servers with pentabytes of data. I'm sure keeping those idle was a significant loss for Leaseweb.

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9240179/LeaseWeb_wipe...

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Not even the servers, just the hard drives. No reason to store anything else, right?

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A better (but still not perfect) analogy would have been that the police cordoned off a section of the store and no one was allowed to take anything from or put anything on the shelves. The store is still open and people can shop but can't buy any of the items in the 'special' area.

Without a court order to keep the servers accessible and running they had every right to delete them (since they own the machines). One would think the prosecution would have had that order in place just so the defendant couldn't say there was no way to prove his innocence

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In this case, the videotape also contains a lot of peoples' personal files that they were hoping to get back one day, maybe.

(Pre-emptive edit: I'm not saying the host should have to take losses for this; the investigators should have been responsible for paying for/backing up the 3rd party data.)

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More analogy, what if it was one of those storage space services and one customer rented half the storage units to store other people's stuff, then got arrested and no longer paid for the storage units. And the storage units were gold-plated and cooled and cost a fixed amount a minute they're used.

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You would still need health insurance unless everyone agreed to never leave a 10 mile radius of the work hospital.

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He deserves sympathy for the way this has been handled.

He has been held for something like 7 months without charges under a law that is supposed to allow holding someone while evidence is gathered. The person is not supposed to be held for more than 7 days, 14 at the most. So they've had to keep filing and getting a judge to approve extensions to keep holding him without charging him.

Now, one wonders if they needed 7+ months to gather evidence, if they ever had any evidence to begin with, to justify arresting him.

Who knows, but this is not off to a good start.

The likely answer:

Charges come, they are dropped or dismissed (they were possibly fabricated to begin with), since he is in the country now he is dealt with for Pirate Bay related stuff, credited with time served and is either released or imprisoned for a few more months, and then everyone forgets about it.

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The judge giving extensions is key here. It is customary to operate like this in Scandinavian countries. The idea is that the police has to make a case to the judge that it is worthwhile to still hold him and that they are making progress in the case. Otherwise he would have been released long ago.

It is quite different from other countries, I know, but law is not handled the same way all over the world.

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The prosecutor formally has to make the case to extend the remand prison, but it's a formality.

Of course it benefits the prosecutor to keep someone locked up while you work on the prosecution evidence.

But it severly restricts the imprisoned person from working on their defense. Thus, it is bad for the legal principle of "equality at arms".

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I would imagine it is easy for the prosecutor to claim the dependent is a flight risk, since they had such difficulty getting him into the country.

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> He has been held for something like 7 months without charges under a law that is supposed to allow holding someone while evidence is gathered.

Is this true? It sounds like no difference from totalitarian system such as Chinese government to legally detain a person for while gathering evidence.

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Can't really go around throwing that particular rock while we still live in the Gitmo glass house.

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All the more reason to throw it actually. Then let them throw it back and one way or another we can all stop living in glass houses.

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