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One of my favorite keyboard layout tweaks is being able to tap left/right shift for open/close parens. How well it works depends on the keyboard but especially on split keyboards it can be very nice.

I can actually reproduce this right now in Chromium on arm64 Linux. Chromium 125.0.6422.76, no error messages in the developer console when this happens. Still, interesting that (I think?) all these reports have been from Chrome/ium on arm64 platforms... I wonder if we're triggering some architecture-specific browser bug?

To get to the exception, got to "Sources" in the dev-console and check both "Pause on uncaught exceptions" and "Pause on caught exceptions". Reload and start the debugger.

I got thoroughly sucked into this game after the jam, then showed it to a couple friends while over at their house. Nice way to spend an evening :)

I'd love one of these displays in my MNT Reform too. Another (tiny!) indie tech company :)


> as soon as I start to write my hand cramps up.

I always had similar problems in school growing up. A few things that I've found helpful:

- Try a larger pen. It helps you maintain your grip on the pen without as much effort.

- Try a pen with less viscous ink. If you're used to ballpoints, this can mean e.g. a rollerball. This lets you write without putting much pressure on the page, which at least for me significantly helps to avoid hand cramps. (I use fountain pens these days myself which write with even less pressure, but rollerballs are a more familiar starting point.)


Thanks, I think for me part of the cramp is a mental block - I spent a long time hating writing (and English lessons in particular) and being told I was bad at it/lazy.

but as soon as I could type my essays I loved English and writing.


If so I would like to see more of what the MNT Reform[0] is doing. You can have your CPU, GPU, and memory all on a single board while still making that board a module in a reusable chassis. There's no reason the rest of the device needs to be scrapped when you upgrade.

[0] https://mntre.com/modularity.html


That's a problem in and of itself I think. We need to shift attitudes more towards repair, and as part of that we need skilled tradespeople who can repair stuff.


Before we can do any of that we would need to fix the race to the bottom mindset. Even with new materials and shipping, it's cheaper just mass produce in a third world country than to pay someone's labor to repair here. That's going to take changes to global trade and domestic income/pay.


The first thing that popped into my mind is that in the city nearest me, Chinatown was bisected by a freeway back in the 80s (opening in 1991). That'll be a bunch of new carcinogens in the air concentrated around that specific neighborhood.


The only thing in that screencapture that happens outside of the space shooter game is relaunching the game after closing it. If you know that pressing the up arrow and enter to run the last command is a common thing, I don't think that's too hard to follow.

Granted, I've played the space shooter in question before, so I do have some context :)


> The only thing in that screencapture that happens outside of the space shooter game is relaunching the game after closing it. If you know that pressing the up arrow and enter to run the last command is a common thing, I don't think that's too hard to follow.

Working out that that's all that's happening (not to mentioning ask the inevitable, "Why is there a screencapture included here at all?") takes about 2–10x the amount of time it takes to read this description that says that's what it's showing.


Depends, I work daily with console, so I just reasoned that a sequence of:

- exit game

- console shows prompt for new command

- command magically appears fully defined

- game starts again

is a normal "quit, recall with arrow up, restart". It's pretty evident and intuitive for most developers working with console applications and didn't require any thinking why those things are represented so. It's the first time I've heard of spritely goblins or seen that video.


This comment reeks of sophomoric-douchebag-leaping-at-the-chance-to-talk-down-to-someone-he-assumes-is-a-noob laced with confirmation cum survivorship/selection bias ("the thing I assumed was being shown is what was being shown").

> I work daily with console

"with console"? Aside from that—

Okay? So what? Me too.

> It's pretty evident and intuitive for most developers working with console applications and didn't require any thinking

Really? Did you perform a survey? That "most developers" who spend their days inside a terminal emulator immediately grokked what the author was trying to communicate on the first viewing?

It's not evident that that's what's going on, because you can't see an up arrow keystroke. You see a flash of a command—too briefly to read—and even then it's not evident (even if you assume that it's simply an instance of up-arrow-followed-by-enter) that the command is merely a command to relaunch the game. Are there arguments being passed at the command line—and is there maybe something we can glean from them—or is it just a bare command? If upon multiple playthroughs of the looping GIF we see that it's the latter, is that because it's a script that encapsulates the interesting stuff?

For context, the GIF in question is presented as the payload to a sentence that begins, "Here's an example of our persistence system in action:". And the section immediately prior to that reads:

> Spritely Goblins has the answer, incorporating a powerful new persistence mechanism (codenamed "Aurie") which empowers you to save relevant parts of a running Goblins program and wake them up later! But that's not all -- you can also use Goblins' persistence system to upgrade your saved objects as they evolve, and it even helps making live hacking even more powerful since you can change objects and reload them with upgraded behavior live!

That's the context; at the point where the GIF is dumped into the post, I'm primed to see a demo of something a lot more involved than what's actually there. I'm primed to see a hacking session in a live programming system with a brand new persistence mechanism—with its own codename ("Aurie"). What we're actually rewarded with is a screencapture of a game just like any other game we've seen in the last 30+ years that saves when you quit and starts off where you left it.


This is great! I've been following the Spritely project on the sidelines for a while now and have built a couple toy applications with Goblins; persistence and IO were often my biggest pain points. Looking forward to giving this a try soon!


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