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I dropped out of MIT both to do a startup overseas (ITAR) and because my parents wouldn't contribute any of the "expected family contribution" and I couldn't get enough loans on my own.

Rather than all the crazy games, I'd prefer if education were genuinely market priced, or if individuals could take reasonable debt loads or sign indenture agreements. A commercial organization should be allowed to do something like ROTC; paying an undergrad full college costs in exchange for a guaranteed employee for 2-4y post graduation at market rate.

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The company I work for offers bursaries to undergrad students. If I'm not mistaken, they even offer guaranteed industry experience by employing them afterwards. Not exactly the same as your suggestion, but on-par.

These things do exist, and higher education is not solely in the realm of government or colleges' doing. All it takes is for some sparky individual/group to implement it if the need is there. That is why it is very important to let the market price things using regular signals, instead of distorting it with government intervention.

What I mean is that currently there is a big shortage here for good software developers. So companies are willing to spend money on training up, paying college fees, whatever it takes.

On a side note. People are very wary of things such as "indenture agreements". It reminds them of slavery too much (I would hypothesize), as it seems they've conflated historically indentured workers with defacto slaves, despite consent.

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> A commercial organization should be allowed to do something like ROTC; paying an undergrad full college costs in exchange for a guaranteed employee for 2-4y post graduation at market rate.

I'm fairly certain they can. In fact, tuition reimbursement programs aren't uncommon amongst elite employers.

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Almost any organization can find employee much faster than 2-4 years. So there is no sane reasons to pay for somebody's education, especially when there are chances that person can be expelled.

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That doesn't really work when the are already more graduates than jobs in many fields.

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Heard of STEM?

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Yes, and I see fresh faced engineers and programmers going unemployed for over a year out of school, all the time.

Seriously, pretty much the only field right now with a serious demand > supply condition is nursing, and MDs willing to do general family practice rather than higher-paying specialties.

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I don't see unemployed vaguely competent cs grads unless they are unwilling or unable to relocate.

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Many people can't/don't want to uproot their entire life and move to some overpriced suburb of SF.

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What college kid has 'an entire life' to uproot? If you go into oceanography, hard to complain if the jobs are near the ocean; similar with other professions. You have to be willing to go where the jobs are.

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The shortage of doctors is not due to market conditions. The government limits the supply of slots in medical schools and residencies, which then limits the number of new doctors.

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What about it? Are there actually more jobs than graduates there?

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Yes, the correct solution is structured cabling with punchdown jacks, punchdown patch panels, and commercially manufactured and certified patch and lobe cords. No one is going to pay commercial electrician rates, even lv, to futz around with a crimper, especially when one little plastic tab getting snapped off means a cable needs to be re terminated.

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I have done a lot of punchdown jack connections, and a few crimp connections, and I have to agree that the punchdown connections (into a female jack which receives a patch cord, and the patch cord goes to the device) have been much more deterministic. It is rare when one does not work the first time.

I wasn't using structured cabling, just ordinary Cat5e cable.

But I think for a security camera, as in the parent comment, which may be getting PoE, the tidiest connection would use a crimp-down male RJ45. I would not enjoy being up on a ladder fussing with a crimping tool and 8 stubby wires.

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Make sure you are using solid wire cable with solid wire connectors, or stranded wire cable with stranded wire connectors. They are quite different.

I used to make a lot of Ethernet cables, but pretty much stopped when I went to Cat 6. Beyond that, you need to be careful to remain consistent 568B or 568A, etc., and it gets messy. Almost all 10GE I've ever used has been fiber, though.

Almost had a physical altercation with someone who wired a building straight through vs correctly. Amazingly you could still get a 10M link on longer runs, or a 100M link on patches.

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Wait, what did the person you argued with do wrong? I don't understand.

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I think by "straight through" he meant that the ends were wired with pairs on 1/2, 3/4, 5/6, and 7/8, instead of the correct 1/2, 3/6, 4/5, 7/8.

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When was it clear internally that FedEx was going to be one of the most significant companies of the century? (I'm trying to calibrate how much visibility insiders have into this, vs the public)

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When? That was the intention from the beginning. The first goal was to serve 90 US cities. Broadly there was nothing seriously wrong with the plan. The idea, now common in the VC community, that can't plan such things accurately enough is absurd.

Once virality started to take hold and the package volume grew, standing in the sorting center was an enthralling experience: The astounding, mind-bending variety of what the US economy wanted to ship with high priority was beyond comprehension and belief. Early on, time critical legal papers? Sure, there were plenty of those. Okay.

A cubic foot of some specific small metal fasteners a big production line needed ASAP or shut down at some cost of thousands of dollars an hour. Fine.

But bricks? Yup: A brick oven could send some samples to an architect, or an architect could send the samples to a customer.

Spare parts for computers, etc.? Yup. But baby chicks? Yup. Medical samples on the way to a medical testing lab? Yup. A live baby bear? It happened.

The variety was beyond all belief and comprehension.

No question about the need, definitely a must have -- a large fraction of the customers would have paid nearly anything, often beyond all reason.

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> That was the intention from the beginning.

It's so inspiring hearing about people who had unbelievable expectations from the very beginning. I always hear about the opposite – younger Zuckerberg expecting someone bigger like Microsoft/Google/etc to build the "real Facebook" [1], Larry and Sergey thinking they'd never make it to be as big as Shawn Fanning [2], etc.

Those are all extremely interesting, but I'm much more interested in what goes on with people who call it from the beginning. I'd love it if you wrote a book. Do you have a blog?

[1] https://youtu.be/MGsalg2f9js?t=13m24s

[2] http://www.jacquesmattheij.com/startup-school-2010/ron-conwa...

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i can't remember if we used fedex or ups but the most expensive shipping i've purchased was the result of an oversight. booth equipment, about 200 pounds, overnight from LA to denver in order to make a trade show. cost us nearly 2 grand but the cost of not shipping would have been much greater!

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I've seen the same $20k bobcat skid steer air freighted express multiple times, due to weird accounting issues.

And "the world's largest plane" chartered to ship ballots.

Exotic/live animal transport is probably the weirdest, though.

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I wonder how many people send sensitive credentials or other operational details through Slack. It'd definitely be a target (along with mail systems) if you want to attack better-protected customer systems.

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I think that's the point of slack, being able to communicate sensitive information. Where would you relay something like an Amazon AWS Access Key?

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PGP encrypted email.

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We always use onetimesecret.com even over Slack

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Someone turning a widely-used third-party-hosted JS into "evil" seems like an incredibly difficult layer 7 DDoS to address. Assuming you have great capacity to filter on the edge (CloudFlare, being Google, etc.), but a limited backend, it's still very hard to identify legit vs. non-legit traffic and do filtering.

(Obviously if the attack is against, say, Chinese users, and your site's legitimate users are mainly in Estonia, you can do filtering, or if the attack only hits an obscure URL, but the attack doesn't have to be weak in that way.)

There are a bunch of potential ways to address it, but they all work best if you have a site with a defined community of users. If you're a large public site, without login, it's hard. Some of the better techniques are in-browser challenges (JS, CAPTCHA, etc.), but it's conceivable with enough endpoint with real browsers and real humans on them, these could get defeated.

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GitHub seems to have done just this. Both attack URLs return

>alert("WARNING: malicious javascript detected on this domain")

They can probably serve that without hitting their database servers.

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Wow (I missed alumni demo day this year because I'm at a conference in Florida). I knew about a lot of these already, and some are great, but of those I didn't know about -- if http://techcrunch.com/2015/03/16/shift-labs-medical-devices-... is actually possible, executes well, etc., it's going to be amazing, both in terms of any potential profits, but more importantly, changing the industry. Less extortionately expensive medical devices would be huge, especially outside the developed world. If equipment drops in price so it can be updated more frequently, it should evolve faster, and rapidly get better than the expensive equipment even independent of cost, too.

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FDA clearance is a real pain. I spent some time at a medical device manufacturer and saw very long cycles from R&D to FDA clearance.

I see their point about the high average cost of most medical devices, but I'm interested in why they started out with an infusion pump... that market is pretty competitive, even in the low-cost segment.

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Another Company doing similar stuff is Stasis Labs. They're more focused on the low end (they're targeting small hospitals in India), but they have the potential to be huge

http://www.stasislabs.com/

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And this is why companies should pay ex employees and contractors in full and make be parting as painless as possible. Even if the contractor was horrible, unless it was criminal, pay in full for time, and err on the side of overpayment and a clean break.

Otherwise stuff like this gets brought up out of context, and even worse, sometimes it happens in private when someone is considering a job or purchase of product, and something like this can hurt you when you aren't even aware it is hurting you.

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Just to be a pedant, you are talking about Registry of .ly cctld. Their registrar is a separate provider with a contract with the registry.

I'm not a fan of abusing ccTLDs as generics, although in the case of .io I'm willing to make an exception since Indian Ocean Territory isn't really a country.

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He has a specific gripe about this because of an adult-themed website that lost its domain registration, since Libya is an Islamic country and the registrar adheres to a different set of cultural standards.

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Yeah, I personally think using .LY is insane for a lot of reasons, including that.

I'm annoyed by .co, even, though.

DNSSEC makes the problems with misuse of ccTLDs even more apparent.

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We pushed an update on CloudFlare. This wasn't anywhere near as bad as some of the previous vulnerabilities.

https://blog.cloudflare.com/openssl-security-advisory-of-19-...

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