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It switches between T-Mobile and Sprint.

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sounds like its excellent for Coachella.

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Looks like they're grabbing up talent for a future Office suite competitor of sorts. Makes sense if they want to differentiate themselves as a cloud storage platform, but I do wonder how that would play into their current partnership with Microsoft as the sole "external provider" for the Office iOS apps.

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> current partnership with Microsoft as the sole "external provider"

I don't see that as an special partnership, MS used their public API to integrate Dropbox into their apps. The benefit is more on MS side for Office, since they invited more DB users to use MS Office.

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They acquired Berlin based startup a year ago https://readmill.com/, which was building ebook reading service.

They specialised in PDF and epub formats.

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Competing with MS Office... The business acumen in dropbox seem like an all-time high.

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One thing that needs to be considered is that SpaceX is operating in a space that has far higher risk for a (relatively) indeterminate reward right now. A single accident could severely damage the company's reputation and revenue stream, and I think their valuation might reflect this cautious approach to their business model.

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I agree; though as a side point - after 3 failures in 2008 and that famous "optimism, pessimism, fuck that" quote, I want to believe it will take more than just a single accident to damage SpaceX's reputation.

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You could replace spacex with whatsapp in that paragraph and it would still be true- more so even- the barrier to change with messaging apps is almost zero however everyone knows rockets are hard and no one expects a failure on the pad to destroy what is looking like a good launch track record.

If whatsapp start charging or introduce ads I can't see why people would stick around, considering the Huge number of whatsapp users who also have viber/snapchat/basis sms also installed

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Great presentation, it was very easy to follow and understand.

Quick question though: is the only reason for using Docker containers with LaTeX file compilation for providing isolation between documents? Isn't there a performance hit versus running file compilation directly on worker machines, perhaps with some sort of folder-based isolation (workers will only compile files in folders that the user has permissions to)?

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Thanks!

Isolation is definitely one of the main benefits for us. Compared to e.g. a chroot, docker also lets us disable networking and restrict memory etc. for the process in the container. It's another important layer of security.

Another benefit is that the Dockerfile also makes it a lot easier to manage installation of all the LaTeX packages, fonts and various scientific software that we have installed.

The overheads seem to be very low --- less than 100ms extra startup and tear down time, and no significant difference in runtime speed.

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My assumption was that these Macs were primarily used for automated headless testing of iOS applications; as a (relatively) cheap Mac that is able to run the simulator and whatnot, this could make sense.

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This was on Reddit a couple of days ago, it seems that the Tesla door handles are able to break through ice so you can still get into the car: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYXKY7fpHWA

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So correct me if I'm wrong, but they appear to have done the same thing with the Mac Mini to achieve the lower price point as they did with the iMac earlier this year, by introducing a 1.4Ghz i5 model? I don't recall the base Mac Mini being as weak before...

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Looks like they took the same CPU used in the MacBook Air. Assuming I got the models right and the benchmark is accurate [0] it doesn't look like you are loosing too much in the end...

[0]: http://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp[]=2238&cmp[]=815

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Correct. Yesterday a the entry Mac Mini was $599 and had a 2.5GHz dual-core i5 with 4GB of RAM.

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I hate the Intel nomenclature break on mobile vs desktop. On desktops, Celeron is dual core, i3 is dual core with hyperthreading, i5 is quad core, and i7 is quad core with hyperthreading. On the other front, they mix random clock values and core counts across skews so you never know if your i7 is a quad core with hyperthreading (4750Q for example) or a low power dual core (4700U) because there the suffixes on the parts number dictate core counts and such.

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It's very annoying. If it ain't at least quad core, it shouldn't be an i7.

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To be fair, the i3/i5/i7 brand is for consumers ("i7 is better than i5"), and the "4750Q" is for OEMs.

Remember: you're not Intel's customer, you're Apple's customer.

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I believe you are incorrect. i3 has hyperthreading, i5 has turboboost, and i7 has both. If what you say were true, I shouldn't be able to get a dual core i5 or i7 in the latest Minis. store.apple.com/us/buy-mac/mac-mini?product=MGEN2LL/A&step=config

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At least early on, there were dual core i5's...

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Wow, that's quite the downgrade. What's the logic here? To save energy to keep it fanless? Or is this cost-cutting?

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Perhaps it is just that modern CPUs are powerful enough that even the low-end ones are now Good Enough for most people. There have always been cheaper CPUs available; Apple just avoided them in favor of a better experience.

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I would imagine being energy efficient and cheap is their main goal. This is the kind of computer people will leave on, plugged into their TV.

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Ding ding ding. My TV and home media and general server needs are powered by a Mid-2010 Mac Mini 4,1 with a 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo, which is most certainly less than half the horsepower of this new model [1], and it works great. This would only be an improvement for this or any other use.

[1] Hey, I was right: https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare.php?cmp[]=2238&cmp[]=14...

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Yup. If I was to put together another HTPC, this would be the ideal product I think (something that runs XBMC). I spent about $800 (sigh..) on putting together something a lot bulkier and noisier about a year ago.

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1.4ghz is the base clock speed, but it can clock up to turbo frequencies of 2.7ghz. I don't know why Apple doesn't use that figure instead.

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The Motorola Backflip (http://www.gsmarena.com/motorola_backflip-3079.php) actually had a touch pad in the back that could be used in the same way trackballs were used on Blackberries. It was pretty awful to use, though that might have been because it ran Android 1.6

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It won't shut down, it will just bill you at a rate of 10 cents for each additional minute used. I usually keep some extra money in my T-Mobile balance so this has never been an issue on the rare occasions I go over 100 minutes.

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It seems that only Nexus devices are getting the update today, and not the Samsung/HTC Play Edition phones. It will be interesting to see when those two devices get the update; in the meantime, not all Play devices are made equal?

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