Hacker Newsnew | comments | ask | jobs | submit | raquo's commentslogin

Someone please do this. You can charge for online chat with a professional, maybe business filings, etc. All glory will be yours.

reply

Ygg2 6 hours ago | link

Uggh, from what I've heard IRS makes time management look like a simpleton banging toy trains and making "wuwu" sounds.

And time management is notoriously hard. Not to mention this will need security up the bum.

How much would it cost just to read all the documentation and have the program certified, so it can do what it's supposed to do without writers getting sued?

reply


Your next employer will probably ask you something like "Are you under any non-compete or similar agreement?" You will either have to lie to them or convince them that reporting what you're workin on is not a violation of their security policies etc.

reply


kovrik, if you seriously put your mind on it, you can move out of Russia. I won't say "effortlessly", but it is probably easier than you think.

Make sure to do your research – e.g. countries like Australia and Canada are much easier to move to than US or EU. IT professionals are in high demand everywhere. You can start by working remotely, etc.

Good luck.

reply


Popular issues like environmentalism and LGBT rights may be advancing, but more niche yet equally important issues, such as excessive privacy intrusions (mass surveillance, TSA), software and "DNA" patents are not. And these are important issues that will shape the future.

reply


Having read the article, I think the journalist got confused – what is stressful and requires insane skills is flying very low, following the terrain between mountains/hills.

However, flying a mile high is only slightly different from flying 6 miles high in terms of stress experienced or skill required.

-----


They'll just blacklist every single one of these sites for enabling access to illegal materials and you won't even be able to read EFF from Russia. And if a Russian citizen creates a public proxy, they'll convict him on anti-terrorist charges. That'll deter the rest.

I am not convinced that pushing Putin to exercise his dictatorial abilities is a good idea when his approval ratings among the general population are so high. I mean, if people already hated him, that might have pushed them over the edge. But as it stands now, general population is more likely to rationalize blocking than admit that Putin is evil.

-----

aric 33 days ago | link

> "They'll just blacklist every single one of these sites..."

That's the point: pressure. Outside sites willing to expose themselves to an 'iron curtain' is a true form of solidarity in this era where a world is more connected. Push-back is exactly how successful, peaceful movements are waged.

-----

avmich 33 days ago | link

One can just wait - dictatorial approach always becomes clear, as the people's life suffer, but it takes time to distinguish propaganda from reality.

The hope is this time it wouldn't take that long. However there should be reasons to change the society faster - and that requires efforts.

-----


If it malfunctions you don't want it to overheat and burn the plane down. Thus the ability to cut power.

-----

jfoster 34 days ago | link

One might say the same about all of the electronic devices on planes. Cellphones and the like.

-----

sp332 34 days ago | link

https://xkcd.com/651/

-----

kalleboo 34 days ago | link

And this is why Li-ion batteries are no longer allowed in checked bags.

-----

dijit 34 days ago | link

they're not? I travelled with 2 laptops in my checked luggage in January.

-----

rschmitty 34 days ago | link

Hey man what are you doing! We can finally use our devices during take off and now you hint at keeping them off permanently! Eek! :P

I'm sure the first battery meltdown/fire on a plane is going to cause a riot in the news but the odds...

-----

jfoster 34 days ago | link

That did cross my mind when I posted it.

I should point out that I don't know what is true. It just seems to be a contradiction that every passenger can take on board and use whatever they want in-flight, yet transponders specially engineered to be safe on a plane must be able to be disabled.

I suspect the answer is that the transponder doesn't need to be under the control of anyone on the plane.

-----

ZoF 34 days ago | link

The answer is that when there's 100+ planes parked at an airport it's confusing to have 100's of transponders on as other planes are trying to land.

-----

walshemj 34 days ago | link

so just have a load cells on the undercarriage and a circuit that detects when a plane is landed so that you can only turn off the transponder when the plane is landed.

-----

DEinspanjer 34 days ago | link

Maybe it has to do with the location on the transponder? A laptop in baggage or an electrical component buried deep in the bowels of the plane would be hard to get to in the event of a potential fire. A passenger's laptop would be fairly easy to put out with a fire extinguisher.

-----

noselasd 34 days ago | link

This device is a bigger piece of equipment using more power, with physical interconnects to other areas on a plan. Moreover it normally not located a place where you can lift it up and throw it in a bucket of water, or rip out its battery if something should go wrong.

-----


Here's just a few factors:

– Security: possible to do background checks on citizens of your own country, easier to hold them responsible, less chance of rogue employee, etc.

– Communication problems: both in terms of poor communication skills being more apparent in limited telecommuting communication channels, and cultural differences (different norms of subordination, etc.). Language barriers and time zone differences also go here.

– "Outsourcing" is a misnomer for what you describe, and has a poor reputation for a reason. Turns out hiring cheap incompetent sweatshop workers using an intermediary/broker is apparently not a good idea if you want a decent result. And quality workers are not as cheap as you'd expect in their home countries because they are a rare breed globally.

– Telecommuting on the other hand, by which I mean hiring individual contractors to work remotely, can work out pretty well if you do quality control in-house. It will surely become more popular.

-----


"Satoshi Nakamoto: I am not Dorian Nakamoto" is not relevant to HN (see first paragraph in http://ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html).

It could have well been killed manually.

-----

baby 39 days ago | link

Apparently it is for many of us: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=7358150

-----


No need to pay, I'll shamelessly plug my HN app for free :)

http://hnapp.com/filter/6e3b6ce969ee72bdbf7d2c23152d4082 (It's primarily intended to be used through RSS)

Ironically, it does not filter out this post because the title is too cryptic.

-----

More

Lists | RSS | Bookmarklet | Guidelines | FAQ | DMCA | News News | Feature Requests | Bugs | Y Combinator | Apply | Library

Search: