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>but still bad for the "free market".

Yet another case whereby a natural consequence of a free market is "bad" for the free market.

In reality it's only bad for the consumer, and certainly not the businesses.


And that second case really annoys me, but I'd still rather not take the alternative to a free market, which is that idiots and douchebags decide what's good for me, and leave me with even less choice.

It depends.

People used to read 500 page books on compilers. Would you read an equivalently long blog article on compilers?

With the Internet we've gained the ability to more readily acquire knowledge in little bits at a time, over a lot of areas. But most of us are incapable of reading a really huge article in depth. And thus we get more shallow levels of understanding, but across a wider range of topics. This explains a lot of arguments on the internet.

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> But most of us are incapable of reading a really huge article in depth

It's not a "capability", it's a skill. The problem is it's becoming less and less important in everyday life for most people, which in turn makes them abandon its training. As with most skills, without training you become worse at it with time.

I'm not sure if that's good or bad thing that you can now learn without having mastered this skill. Is the understanding you gain via lots of small chunks of knowledge worse than the one you get from reading The Dragon Book? I don't know; looks like a good topic for research in cognitive science.

Personally I do like reading long and involved texts, but I too learned to enjoy it before the Internet became popular. I don't know if I'd be equally interested in such texts had I started just a few years later.

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You mean, have I read these books when the entire thing is put on the web? Yes.

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Reddit had a link to a study proving this phenomenon a couple of days ago.

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IMO the most worrying statistic in support of a bubble is that graph showing valuations outpacing fundraising. The very definition of a bubble is a positive feedback loop of overvaluation.

Fundraising being low compared to valuations is a sign that VCs' risk appetites take into account the probability that everything is hugely overvalued.

Fundraising could ultimately surge towards 2000 levels if people really start drinking the Kool-Aid. But if it pulls back then I'd expect to see valuations plummet and, accordingly, share prices.

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Interesting. From the perspective of a total outsider far away from the United States, I always thought the Valley's tech scene was strangely sort of cult-like, in a way. It seems that there's really no limit to commercialisation, and spirituality is next in line to be 'designed' into a product and either sold to people, or will sell users' spirituality to advertisers, insurers and political parties.

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It seems cult-like from the inside too.

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A link about conscious entities lurking unseen within my own mind, and slenderman? No, just no. Not clicking it.

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The article is not necessarily scientific in that I'm not sure how you'd test or falsify the ideas, but at the same time it's a very interesting and perhaps very useful philosophical piece.

Often, ideas for science come from logically robust philosophical reasoning. I mean, sometimes they come from freak accidents also. But there's definitely validity in the simple (and awesome) exploration of cool ideas, as long as it's logically consistent.

The multiple agents idea gave me a weird momentary spell of depersonalisation, which was interesting. It's certainly compelling and not really incompatible with modern scientific understanding - it seems a plausible abstraction/description considering the way the brain is known to be wired together.

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I also experienced some depersonalization thinking deeply about this.

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'Competition' isn't the panacea solving all problems that some make it out to be.

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fgsfds!

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Probably also get a low BogoMIPS score if you boot up an image with a web browser, then run javascript emulation inside the javascript emulation.

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