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(Semi-related) I'm an L-1A spouse. It took my work application 10 months to get processed, when the USCIS' own regulation stated that the it should have been closed in 90 days.

You call them, ask them, plead with them. Nothing. "Your application is in the system and is getting processed."

Nine months into it, it turned out that they lost my digital picture taken at a USCIS facility. How in this day and age one loses digital pictures is beyond me.

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Is this data accurate? As a Turkish fan, I don't recall nor can find any records of Turkey losing to Switzerland by a 7-0 margin in 1998.

Edit: Also sadly, Turkey didn't make it to the World Cup in '98.

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The only thing I could find was potentially a 7-0 match for Turkey vs. Korea in the 1954 World Cup, which was played in Switzerland? Hard to say, since the data seems to come from:

http://www.world-results.net/

and is a paywalled API.

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http://www.fifa.com/tournaments/archive/worldcup/switzerland...

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Perhaps this includes qualifying matches.

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The only World Cup qualifier that I could find (going back to 1990) are the play-off games between Turkey and Switzerland in '06. Switzerland wins the first game 2-0, and Turkey wins the second one 4-2.

Nothing as dramatic as a 7-0 margin as suggested by the article's data though.

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The link seems to be broken?

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Was broken when I checked earlier, seems to be fixed.

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Working fine here.

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My guess with NBA players would be that the proportional increase in their heights would be higher.

Does anyone know changes to average weight/height for the population in the US?

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I think it would be average weight for NBA players. Modern NBA players are a lot more muscular.

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As a quick side note, PostgreSQL had the HyperLogLog data type for a while: https://github.com/aggregateknowledge/postgresql-hll

For people who need SQL and HyperLogLog, we found this extension to work pretty well.

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If you don't have access to Internet, unfortunately, it does.

I called my mom who lives in Eskisehir Saturday morning TST, and asked her about the protests. Her reaction was, "What protests?" If you get your news from TV, and if none of them broadcast the protests, then how would you know?

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Sadly, when there is internet connection, the problem doesn't simply go away. In Russia, internet media are heavily censored too - so internet user has to make effort to obtain the information not biased in favour of Putin's government: there are only several "unbiased" regular online media(not counting social media like big social networks like facebook or twitter). It is much simpler to just turn on TV especially if you don't care much about politics.

The described reaction is extremely familiar to me. There were major protests in Russia during winter 2011/2012. The first protest event happened the next day after federal parliament elections(quite important event). So, after another 2 days I call my mother(she lives about 3000 km away from Moscow) and ask her if she heared about protests, and get the same reaction "What protests?".

Five days after the initial event, there was another: ~50 000 - 100 000 people gathered in the center of Moscow. Did the federal governmental media mention it? This time did, but very briefly, and understating the number of participants by order of magnitude.

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I guess this is when social media comes in handy.

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https://bloodyshovel.wordpress.com/2012/03/06/on-fairness/

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If some guy is bad it doesn't automatically makes Putin good. If democracy in other countries is not a real democracy, it doesn't make Putin a democratic president instead of bloody dictator.

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His actual quote about news spreading through social media is near the middle of the article.

"There is now a menace which is called Twitter," Erdogan said. "The best examples of lies can be found there. To me, social media is the worst menace to society."

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In most of the world, revolutions come bottom up. In Turkey, they came top down. It was the military that toppled the "sultan" and established the parliamentary system / Turkish Republic. And later it was a former general who set up the multi-party system (and didn't get elected).

I know it sounds off, but what the Founding Fathers did for the US, the generals did for Turkey. Not a very healthy one I agree, but at least they established whatever form of democracy Turkey has today.

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> It was the military that toppled the "sultan" and established the parliamentary system / Turkish Republic

The Young Turk Revolution, while supported by one army corp didn't topple the Sultan. The Sultan (Mehmed VI) was deposed by the Grand National Assembly of the Turkish Republic, a political body.

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Turkey was ruled by one party until 1946 like the ones in Soviet Union. After 4-5 years of the multi party election of the first prime minister that "honest" and "non-corrupt government" hung the prime minister after the coup. The last soft coup in 1998 costed Turkey by one estimation $300Bn. Wanna talk corruption, talk the military and all the state investments...

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Distributed load balancing is a tough problem with two pieces to it. One is the queueing theory part.

The other is the systems side to it. If you have multiple customers and multiple checkout lines, and if your customers act independently without seeing the lines (no feedback from servers, network failures and delays, implementation complexity), what do you do?

It isn't a trivial problem. The easy route is paying Cisco's load balancers millions of dollars, but those only scale so far.

The bigger internet companies spend years of development time trying to make distributed load balancing work, but the issues there are a bit more complicated than a few customers walking to checkout lines.

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